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Technical Paper

Reduced Chemical Mechanism for the Calculation of Ethanol / Air Flame Speeds

2015-09-06
2015-24-2492
Ethanol currently remains the leading biofuel in the transportation sector, with special focus on spark ignition engines, as a pure as well as a blend component. In order to provide reliable numerical simulations of gasoline combustion processes under the influence of ethanol for modern engine research, it is mandatory to develop well validated detailed kinetic combustion models. One key parameter for the numerical simulation is the laminar burning velocity. Under the aspect of minimizing the general simulation effort for burning velocities, well-validated models have to be reduced. As a base kinetic mechanism for the reduction and optimisation process with respect to burning velocity calculations, a detailed model presented by Zhao et al. (Int. J. Chem. Kin. 40 (1) (2007) 1-18) is chosen. The model has been extensively validated against shock tube, rapid compression machine and burning velocity data. The detailed model consists of 55 species and 290 reactions.
Technical Paper

Assessment of the Approximation Formula for the Calculation of Methane/Air Laminar Burning Velocities Used in Engine Combustion Models

2017-09-04
2017-24-0007
Especially for internal combustion engine simulations, various combustion models rely on the laminar burning velocity. With respect to computational time needed for CFD, the calculation of laminar burning velocities using a detailed chemical mechanism can be replaced by incorporation of approximation formulas, based on rate-ratio asymptotics. This study revisits an existing analytical approximation formula [1]. It investigates applicable temperature, pressure, and equivalence ratio ranges with special focus on engine combustion conditions. The fuel chosen here is methane and mixtures are composed of methane and air. The model performance to calculate the laminar burning velocity are compared with calculated laminar burning velocities using existing state of the art detailed chemical mechanisms, the GRI Mech 3.0 [2], the ITV RWTH [3], and the Aramco mechanism [4].
Technical Paper

A Reduced Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for the Autoignition of Dimethyl Ether

2010-10-25
2010-01-2108
A reduced kinetic reaction mechanism for the autoignition of dimethyl ether is presented in this paper. Dimethyl ether has proven to be one of the most attractive alternatives to traditional fossil fuels for compression ignition engines. It can either be produced from biomass or from fossil oil. For dimethyl ether, Fischer et al. (Int. J.Chem. Kinet. 32 ( 12 ) (2000) 713-740) proposed a detailed reaction mechanism consisting of 79 species and 351 elementary reactions. In the present work, this detailed mechanism is systematically reduced to 31 species and 49 reactions. The reduced mechanism is discussed in detail with special emphasis on the high temperature thermal decomposition of dimethyl ether and on the fuel specific depleting reactions, which produce the methoxymethyl radical. In addition, a reaction pathway analysis for low temperature combustion is applied, where hydroperoxy-methylformate is found to be the dominating parameter for the low temperature regime.
Technical Paper

Laminar Burning Velocity of Market Type Gasoline Surrogates as a Performance Indicator in Internal Combustion Engines

2018-09-10
2018-01-1667
The laminar burning velocity is an important parameter in various combustion models for engine simulations. With respect to computational time for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full system engine simulations, the calculation of laminar burning velocities using a detailed chemical mechanism can be replaced by incorporation of approximation formulas, based on rate-ratio asymptotics. In the present study, a work flow is developed to analyze the engine efficiency performance of spark ignition engines with respect to the laminar burning velocity as a fundamental fuel property. Firstly, methane is used as a fuel to assess practicability of the approach. The procedure is subsequently adopted for market type gasoline surrogates, RON95 and RON100. Detailed chemistry calculations are carried out for the three target fuels using existing state of the art mechanisms, the Aramco [Zhou et al., Proc. Combust. Inst., pp. 403-411, 2017] and the ITV RWTH mechanism [Cai et al., Combust.
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