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Journal Article

Hydrogen DI Dual Zone Combustion System

2013-04-08
2013-01-0230
Internal combustion (IC) engines fueled by hydrogen are among the most efficient means of converting chemical energy to mechanical work. The exhaust has near-zero carbon-based emissions, and the engines can be operated in a manner in which pollutants are minimal. In addition, in automotive applications, hydrogen engines have the potential for efficiencies higher than fuel cells.[1] In addition, hydrogen engines are likely to have a small increase in engine costs compared to conventionally fueled engines. However, there are challenges to using hydrogen in IC engines. In particular, efficient combustion of hydrogen in engines produces nitrogen oxides (NOx) that generally cannot be treated with conventional three-way catalysts. This work presents the results of experiments which consider changes in direct injection hydrogen engine design to improve engine performance, consisting primarily of engine efficiency and NOx emissions.
Journal Article

Instabilities at the Low-Flow Range of a Turbocharger Compressor

2013-05-13
2013-01-1886
The acoustic and performance characteristics of an automotive centrifugal compressor are studied on a steady-flow turbocharger test bench, with the goal of advancing the current understanding of compression system instabilities at the low-flow range. Two different ducting configurations were utilized downstream of the compressor, one with a well-defined plenum (large volume) and the other with minimized (small) volume of compressed air. The present study measured time-resolved oscillations of in-duct and external pressure, along with rotational speed. An orifice flow meter was incorporated to obtain time-averaged mass flow rate. In addition, fast-response thermocouples captured temperature fluctuations in the compressor inlet and exit ducts along with a location near the inducer tips.
Technical Paper

Optimization of New Plastic Bracket NVH Characteristics using CAE

2012-10-02
2012-36-0195
NVH requirements are critical in new driveline developments. Failure modes due to resonances must be carefully analyzed and potential root causes must have adequate countermeasures. One of the most common root causes is the modal alignment. This work shows the steps to design and optimize a new plastic bracket for an automotive half shaft bearing. This bracket replaces a very stiff bracket, made of cast iron. The initial design of plastic bracket was not stiff enough to bring natural frequency of the system above engine second order excitation at maximum speed. The complete power pack was modeled and NVH CAE analysis was performed. The CAE outputs included Driving Point Response, Frequency Response Function and Modal analysis. The boundary conditions were discussed deep in detail to make sure the models represented actual system.
Technical Paper

1.8L Sierra-Mondeo Turbo-Diesel Valvetrain Friction Reduction Using a Solid Film Lubricant

1994-10-01
941986
A 1.8L turbocharged diesel engine valvetrain friction was investigated, and the effectiveness of using a solid film lubricant (SFL) coating in reducing friction was determined throughout the operable speed range. This valvetrain design features direct acting mechanical bucket valve lifters. Camshaft journal bearing surfaces and all camshaft rubbing surfaces except lobe tips were coated. The direct acting bucket shims were etched with a cross hatch pattern to a depth sufficient to sustain a SFL film coating on the shim rubbing surfaces subjected to high surface loads. The SFL coated valvetrain torque was evaluated and compared with uncoated baseline torque. Coating the cam bearing journal surfaces alone with II-25D SFL reduced valvetrain friction losses 8 to 17% for 250 to 2000 rpm cam speed range (i.e. 500 - 4000 rpm engine speed). When bucket tappet and shims were also coated with the SFL, further significant reductions in coated valvetrain friction were observed.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Valve Overlap on Idle Operation: Comparison of Model and Experiment

1993-10-01
932751
Validation of the Ford General Engine SIMulation program (GESIM) with measured firing data from a modified single cylinder Ricardo HYDRA research engine is described. GESIM predictions for peak cylinder pressure and burn duration are compared to test results at idle operating conditions over a wide range of valve overlap. The calibration of GESIM was determined using data from only one representative world-wide operating point and left unchanged for the remainder of the study. Valve overlap was varied by as much as 36° from its base setting. In most cases, agreement between model and data was within the accuracy of the measurements. A cycle simulation computer model provides the researcher with an invaluable tool for acquiring insight into the thermodynamic and fluid mechanical processes occurring in the cylinder of an internal combustion engine.
Technical Paper

Wear Protection Properties of Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV) Lubricants

1993-10-01
932791
A laboratory wear test is used to evaluate the wear protection properties of new and used engine oils formulated for FFV service. Laboratory-blended mixtures of these oils with methanol and water have also been tested. The test consists of a steel ball rotating against three polished cast iron discs. Oil samples are obtained at periodic intervals from a fleet of 3.0L Taurus vehicles operating under controlled go-stop conditions. To account for the effects of fuel dilution, some oils are tested before and after a stripping procedure to eliminate gasoline, methanol and other volatile components. In addition to TAN and TBN measurements, a capillary electrophoresis technique is used to evaluate the formate content in the oils. The results suggest that wear properties of used FFV lubricants change significantly with their degree of usage.
Technical Paper

Effect of Engine Operating Parameters on Hydrocarbon Oxidation in the Exhaust Port and Runner of a Spark-Ignited Engine

1995-02-01
950159
The effect of engine operating parameters (speed, spark timing, and fuel-air equivalence ratio [Φ]) on hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation within the cylinder and exhaust system is examined using propane or isooctane fuel. Quench gas (CO2) is introduced at two locations in the exhaust system (exhaust valve or port exit) to stop the oxidation process. Increasing the speed from 1500 to 2500 RPM at MBT spark timing decreases the total, cylinder-exit HC emissions by ∼50% while oxidation in the exhaust system remains at 40% for both fuels. For propane fuel at 1500 rpm, increasing Φ from 0.9 (fuel lean) to 1.1 (fuel rich) reduces oxidation in the exhaust system from 42% to 26%; at 2500 RPM, exhaust system oxidation decreases from 40% to approximately 0% for Φ = 0.9 and 1.1, respectively. Retarded spark increases oxidation in the cylinder and exhaust system for both fuels. Decreases in total HC emissions are accompanied by increased olefinic content and atmospheric reactivity.
Technical Paper

Compression Ratio and Coolant Temperature Effects on HC Emissions from a Spark- Ignition Engine

1995-02-01
950163
Modern four-valve engines are running at ever higher compression ratios in order to improve fuel efficiency. Hotter cylinder bores also can produce increased fuel economy by decreasing friction due to less viscous oil layers. In this study changes in compression ratio and coolant temperature were investigated to quantify their effect on exhaust emissions. Tests were run on a single cylinder research engine with a port-deactivated 4-valve combustion chamber. Two compression ratios (9.15:1 and 10.0:1) were studied at three air/fuel ratios (12.5, 14.6 and 16.5) at a part load condition (1500 rpm, 3.8 bar IMEP). The effect of coolant temperature (66 °C and 108°C) was studied at the higher compression ratio. The exhaust was sampled and analyzed for both total and speciated hydrocarbons. The speciation analysis provided concentration data for hydrocarbons present in the exhaust containing twelve or fewer carbon atoms.
Technical Paper

Laser Ride Height Measurement/Calibration System

1995-02-01
950025
The Laser Ride Height Measurement and Calibration System measures and calibrates the ride height of a vehicle equipped with electronic suspension. The existing process of setting ride height is labor intensive and imprecise leading to vehicles that lean, have improper attitude, and suffer from alignment drift and pull. The proposed Machine and Process will impart the correct appearance and ride height to every vehicle which undergoes this test. A similar process can be used to measure the ride height of vehicles equipped with passive springs.
Technical Paper

Dual Equal VCT - A Variable Camshaft Timing Strategy for Improved Fuel Economy and Emissions

1995-02-01
950975
In the Dual Equal variable camshaft timing strategy, the intake and exhaust events are equally phase-shifted relative to the crankshaft as a function of engine operating conditions. The primary emphasis is on improved fuel economy and emissions at part load. The external EGR system is potentially eliminated, with consequent improvement in the transient control of residual dilution. Additional benefits with optimized phasing are moderate improvements in idle stability and full load performance. In this paper, the Dual Equal VCT strategy is described, and engine dynamometer test results are shown which illustrate the benefits at part load, idle, and WOT. Implications of the strategy on phase-shifter response requirements and on the engine control system are discussed.
Technical Paper

Flow Noises Associated with Integrated Compressor Anti-Surge Valve

2011-05-17
2011-01-1532
Turbocharged gasoline engines are typically equipped with a compressor anti-surge valve or CBV (compressor by-pass valve). The purpose of this valve is to release pressurized air between the throttle and the compressor outlet during tip-out maneuvers. At normal operating conditions, the CBV is closed. There are two major CBV mounting configurations. One is to mount the CBV on the AIS system. The other is to mount the CBV directly on the compressor housing, which is called an integrated CBV. For an integrated CBV, at normal operating conditions, it is closed and the enclosed passageway between high pressure side and low pressure side forms a “side-branch” in the compressor inlet side (Figure 12). The cavity modes associated with this “side-branch” could be excited by shear layer flow and result in narrow band flow noises.
Technical Paper

Stochastic Simulation Method for CAE Vehicle Dynamics Evaluation and Design Robustness Analysis

2010-10-06
2010-36-0251
This work presents a statistical approach for simulation based on Monte Carlo method. As an exercise of the method a CAE vehicle dynamics model was specifically created to evaluate the likelihood to meet a given target driving a maneuver for given inputs variations. In the exercise, three different inputs were chosen as stochastic inputs (also called noise factors) and all relevant information about their statistics has been raised, based in components information. The chosen inputs are: front/rear dampers curves, front/rear ride heights and tire surface temperature. A brief description of the Monte Carlo technique is presented. The choice of this method is due to the reduced number of simulations required to have a given accuracy in comparison with other approaches, especially for multivariable system. As output variable for the exercise, the tire patch height was chosen and the resulting probability density function of it is presented.
Technical Paper

Influence of ride frequency balance in sub limit vehicle stability

2010-10-06
2010-36-0250
Current road vehicles have tendency of use softer suspension springs to improve ride comfort, but as a moving device with suspension system, vehicles have other parts that can affect attributes for comfort perception, and is necessary the correct definition of which one should be modified to address the comfort issue and avoid impact in attributes for stability. Usually springs are not the main responsible for bad comfort behavior, but shock absorbers and bushings are. A typical passenger car shows a wide possibility of loads carriage and how to set up correctly the suspensions considering its tradeoffs and brand DNA is the main issue.
Journal Article

Development of Empirical Shear Fracture Criterion for AHSS

2010-04-12
2010-01-0977
The conventional forming limit curve (FLC) has been widely and successfully used as a failure criterion to detect localized necking in stamping. However, in stamping advanced high strength steels (AHSS), under certain circumstances such as stretching-bending over a small die radius, the sheet metal fails much earlier than predicted by the FLC. This type of failure on the die radius is commonly called “shear fracture.” In this paper, the laboratory Stretch-Forming Simulator (SFS) and the Bending under Tension (BUT) tester are used to study shear fracture occurring during both early and later stages of stamping. Results demonstrate that the occurrence of shear fracture depends on the combination of the radius-to-thickness (R/T) ratio and the tension/stretch level applied to the sheet during stretching or drawing. Based on numerous experimental results, an empirical shear fracture limit curve or criterion is obtained.
Journal Article

Axial Crash Testing and Finite Element Modeling of A 12-Sided Steel Component

2010-04-12
2010-01-0379
To improve the energy absorption capacity of front-end structures during a vehicle crash, a novel 12-sided cross-section was developed and tested. Computer-aided engineering (CAE) studies showed superior axial crash performance of the 12-sided component over more conventional cross-sections. When produced from advanced high strength steels (AHSS), the 12-sided cross-section offers opportunities for significant mass-savings for crash energy absorbing components such as front or rear rails and crush tips. In this study, physical crash tests and CAE modeling were conducted on tapered 12-sided samples fabricated from AHSS. The effects of crash trigger holes, different steel grades and bake hardening on crash behavior were examined. Crash sensitivity was also studied by using two different part fabrication methods and two crash test methods. The 12-sided components showed regular folding mode and excellent energy absorption capacity in axial crash tests.
Technical Paper

Design and Analysis of Starter-Alternator Installation in a Hybrid-Electric Vehicle

1999-03-01
1999-01-0917
The idea of using a single electrical machine for both starting the engine and generating electrical power is not new. However, the real benefits, that justify the higher cost of a combined starter-alternator, become apparent when it is used as part of a hybrid powerplant. This powerplant allows a substantial improvement in fuel economy by a variety of methods (i.e. the engine shut-down during deceleration and idle, regenerative braking, etc.), as well as enhancements to engine performance, emissions, and vehicle driveability. This paper describes the analysis of the structure supporting the starter-alternator on the end of the engine crankshaft (Figure 1). It deals with the requirement to maintain a small radial gap between the rotor and stator, and it discusses how the rotor affects the loading on the crankshaft. In addition, thermal deformations of the rotor/clutch assembly are analyzed with three light-weight materials.
Technical Paper

Perforation Corrosion Evaluation of Precoated Steels by Ford APG Cyclic Test

1993-10-01
932364
Proving Ground cyclic testing was used to evaluate vehicles assembled with electrogalvanized and organic composite coated electrogalvanized steel. These same materials, along with several commonly available precoated steels, were also evaluated as hem flange assemblies on towed trailers at the Proving Ground. Testing was terminated as perforation of some of the assemblies occurred. Pitting depth was used to quantitatively evaluate metal loss.
Technical Paper

Computation of Instantaneous Air Flow and Volumetric Efficiency

1964-01-01
640832
The presentation here of a computer program simulating an engine cycle emphasizes mechanical factors under the control of the engine designer rather than scientific aspects of combustion. Data secured by measuring valves, manifolds, and other parts on a flow bench are used to calculate instantaneous flow in and out of the cylinder for the firing engine. Heat transfer, finite time of combustion, and variable specific heat of the gas are also calculated. The program is particularly well adapted to indicating the direction and relative magnitude of the effect of changing one variable, such as valve size, at a time.
Technical Paper

Limitations of Sector Mesh Geometry and Initial Conditions to Model Flow and Mixture Formation in Direct-Injection Diesel Engines

2019-04-02
2019-01-0204
Sector mesh modeling is the dominant computational approach for combustion system design optimization. The aim of this work is to quantify the errors descending from the sector mesh approach through three geometric modeling approaches to an optical diesel engine. A full engine geometry mesh is created, including valves and intake and exhaust ports and runners, and a full-cycle flow simulation is performed until fired TDC. Next, an axisymmetric sector cylinder mesh is initialized with homogeneous bulk in-cylinder initial conditions initialized from the full-cycle simulation. Finally, a 360-degree azimuthal mesh of the cylinder is initialized with flow and thermodynamics fields at IVC mapped from the full engine geometry using a conservative interpolation approach. A study of the in-cylinder flow features until TDC showed that the geometric features on the cylinder head (valve tilt and protrusion into the combustion chamber, valve recesses) have a large impact on flow complexity.
Technical Paper

Composite Lightweight Automotive Suspension System (CLASS)

2019-04-02
2019-01-1122
The Composite Lightweight Automotive Suspension System is a composite rear suspension knuckle/tieblade consisting of UD prepreg (epoxy resin), SMC (vinylester resin) carbon fibre and a steel insert to reduce the weight of the component by 35% and reduce Co2. The compression moulding manufacturing process and CAE optimisation are unique and ground-breaking for this product and are designed to allow high volume manufacture of approx. 30,000 vehicles per year. The manufacturing techniques employed allow for multi-material construction within a five minute cycle time to make the process viable for volume manufacture. The complexities of the design lie in the areas of manufacturing, CAE prediction and highly specialised design methods. It is a well-known fact that the performance of a composite part is primarily determined by the way it is manufactured.
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