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GreenZone Driving for Plug In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

2012-05-29
Plugin Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have a large battery which can be used for electric only powertrain operation. The control system in a PHEV must decide how to spend the energy stored in the battery. In this paper, we will present a prototype implementation of a PHEV control system which saves energy for electric operation in pre-defined geographic areas, so called Green Zones. The approach determines where the driver will be going and then compares the route to a database of predefined Green Zones. The control system then reserves enough energy to be able to drive the Green Zone sections in electric only mode. Finally, the powertrain operation is modified once the vehicle enters the Green Zone to ensure engine operation is limited. Data will be presented from a prototype implementation in a Ford Escape PHEV Presenter Johannes Kristinsson
Technical Paper

Wavelet-Based Visualization of Impulsive and Transient Sounds in Stationary Background Noise

2001-04-30
2001-01-1475
Scalograms based on shift-invariant orthonormal wavelet transforms can be used to analyze impulsive and transient sounds in the presence of more stationary sound backgrounds, such as wind noise or drivetrain noise. The visual threshold of detection for impulsive features on the scalogram (signal energy content vs. time and frequency,) is shown to be similar to the audible threshold of detection of the human auditory system for the corresponding impulsive sounds. Two examples of impulsive sounds in a realistic automotive sound background are presented: automotive interior rattle in a vehicle passenger compartment, and spark knock recorded in an engine compartment.
Technical Paper

Event-Based Mean-Value Modeling of DI Diesel Engines for Controller Design

2001-03-05
2001-01-1242
Models often use time rather than strokes (crank-angle) as the independent variable to describe engine dynamics despite the fact that the dynamics of an internal combustion engine are intrinsically linked to the combustion events. In this paper, two models are developed in parallel in which not only the independent variable is changed but the notion of mass flows as well: flows are in [g/s] for the time-based model and in [g/st] for the event-based model. Both models are of the same computational complexity and show the same accuracy in validation. The investigation of the model properties shows that variations in the flow-related parameters are reduced by a factor of two to five for the event-based model. However, those of the crankshaft dynamics are increased. It is concluded that the model should be chosen in context of the control system to be designed.
Technical Paper

Motion Analysis Enhances Visualization of Underbody Flow

2001-03-05
2001-01-0628
Velocity profiles for air flowing under a vehicle body are determined by analyzing videotapes of neutrally buoyant soap bubbles using motion analysis software and equipment. What had heretofore been primarily a qualitative flow visualization technique has been extended to provide quantitative data. The light sources, cameras, and bubble generator, mounted on the vehicle, are powered by the vehicle's electrical system, making it possible to compare underbody velocities measured in a wind tunnel with those over the road. Results are presented for a heavy-duty 4×4 pickup truck at speeds up to 25m/s (55 mph). The velocity profiles in the tunnel and on the road were quite similar.
Technical Paper

Effects of Fuel Volatility, Load, and Speed on HC Emissions Due to Piston Wetting

2001-05-07
2001-01-2024
Piston wetting can be isolated from the other sources of HC emissions from DISI engines by operating the engine predominantly on a gaseous fuel and using an injector probe to impact a small amount of liquid fuel on the piston top. This results in a marked increase in HC emissions. In a previous study, we used a variety of pure liquid hydrocarbon fuels to examine the influence of fuel volatility and structure on the HC emissions due to piston wetting. It was shown that the HC emissions correspond to the Leidenfrost effect: fuels with very low boiling points yield high HCs and those with a boiling point near or above the piston temperature produce much lower HCs. All of these prior tests of fuel effects were performed at a single operating condition: the Ford World Wide Mapping Point (WWMP). In the present study, the effects of load and engine speed are examined.
Technical Paper

Influence of Mount Stiffness on Body/Subframe Acoustic Sensitivities

2003-05-05
2003-01-1714
A comparison of acoustic sensitivities of the 2000 Ford Taurus and 1999 Toyota Camry identifies an interesting paradox: the Taurus has a competitive advantage over the Camry when comparing body-only transfer functions, but a handicap to the Camry when the subframe is included in the measurements. Further, the Taurus subframe/mount subsystem actually behaves as an amplifier rather than an isolator over most of the powertrain excited frequency range. This report attempts to explain the cause of these behaviors through a hybrid CAE/test method and recommends a design strategy to lower the Subframe to Driver's Right Ear sensitivities of the Taurus.
Technical Paper

PIV Characterization of a 4-valve Engine with a Camshaft Profile Switching (CPS) system

2003-05-19
2003-01-1803
Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed on a single cylinder optically accesible version of a 3.0L 4-valve engine using a Camshaft Profile Switching (CPS) system. The flow field was investigated at two engine speeds (750 and 1500 rpm), two manifold pressures (75 and 90 kPa) and two intake cam centerlines (maximum lift at 95° and 115° aTDCi respectively). Images were taken in the swirl plane at 10 mm and 40 mm below the deck with the piston at 300° aTDC of intake (60° bTDC compression) and BDC respectively. In the tumble plane, images were taken in a plane bisecting the intake valves with the piston at BDC and 300° aTDC. The results showed that the swirl ratio was slightly lower for this system compared with a SCV system (swirl control valve in the intake port) under the same operating conditions. The swirl and tumble ratios generated were not constant over the range of engine speeds and manifold pressures (MAP) but instead increased with engine speed and MAP.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Different Methods for Battery and Supercapacitor Modeling

2003-06-23
2003-01-2290
In future vehicles (e.g. fuel cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles), the electrical system will have an important impact on the mechanical systems in the car (e.g. powertrain, steering). Furthermore, this coupling will become increasingly important over time. In order to develop effective designs and appropriate control systems for these systems, it is important that the plant models capture the detailed physical behavior in the system. This paper will describe models of two electrical components, a battery and a supercapacitor, which have been modeled in two ways: (i) modeling the plant and controller using block diagrams in Simulink and (ii) modeling the plant and controller in Dymola followed by compiling this model to an S-function for simulation in Simulink. Both the battery and supercapacitor model are based on impedance spectroscopy measurements and can be used for highly dynamic simulations.
Technical Paper

Moving Toward Worldwide Standardization of Environmental and Reliability Testing Practices for Automotive Electrical and Electronic Equipment SAE Reliability Standards Committee Objective No. 3 Environmental Factors Subcommittee

1996-02-01
960976
Globalization of the automotive industry is having significant impact on testing of electrical and electronic equipment. Organizations that previously operated in single-customer, local and national environments are now involved in joint ventures, worldwide engineering programs and/or multiple-customer contracts. Reconciliation of differences in test requirements between all concerned parties is a tedious task which unfortunately can end in the specification of redundant, insufficient and/or inappropriate testing. To address this issue the SAE Reliability Standards Committee has established Objective No. 3. This objective includes the development of three SAE Recommended Practices designed to facilitate harmonization of environmental and reliability testing practices worldwide.
Technical Paper

Effective In-Vehicle Acquisition

1998-02-23
981076
This paper will describe the development of an in-vehicle data acquisition and analysis system. The problem facing the Vehicle Dynamics Test Section of Ford Motor Company was to replace an antiquated data recorder with a versatile in-vehicle data acquisition system capable of supporting vehicle dynamics testing and development. The following criteria for a system was developed: Quick and easy quick software and hardware setup Off-the-shelf hardware wherever possible User-friendly software Flexible Open-ended and modular design Rugged Cost effective Utilizing the above criteria a number of commercially available systems were evaluated and found to be lacking. Therefore it was decided that a system suitable for vehicle dynamics testing would have to be developed.
Technical Paper

The Advantages of Using Standard Vehicle Dynamics Procedures and Analysis Programs

1998-02-23
981077
Globalization in the automotive industry has resulted in a tremendous competitive advantage to those companies who can internally communicate ideas and information effectively and in a timely manner. This paper discusses one such effort related to objectively testing vehicles for steering and handling characteristics by implementing standard test procedures, data acquisition hardware and analysis methods. Ford Motor Company's Vehicle Dynamics Test Section has refined a number of test procedures to the point that, with proper training, all design and development engineers can quickly acquire, analyze and share test results. Four of these procedures and output are discussed in detail.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Friction Modifiers on the Low-Speed Friction Characteristics of Automatic Transmission Fluids Observed with Scanning Force Microscopy

1998-02-23
981099
The effect of friction modifiers on the low-speed frictional properties of automatic transmission fluids (ATFs) was investigated by scanning force microscopy (SFM). A clutch lining material was covered by a droplet of test ATF, and a steel tip was scanned over the sample. The scanning speeds were varied from 0.13 to 8.56 mm /sec, and the frictional force was deduced from the torsion of the SFM cantilever. A reduction in dynamic friction due to the addition of the friction modifier was clearly observed over the entire speed range. This indicates that the boundary lubrication mechanism is dominant under this condition, and therefore surface-active friction modifiers can effectively improve the frictional characteristics. The friction reduction was more pronounced at lower sliding speeds. Thus addition of friction modifiers produced a more positive slope in the μ-ν (friction vs. sliding speed) plots, and would contribute to make wet clutch systems less susceptible to shudder vibrations.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of Spray Transfer Processes in an Electrostatic Rotating Bell Applicator

1998-09-29
982290
A better understanding is needed of the electrostatic rotating bell (ESRB) application of metallic basecoat paint to automobile exteriors in order to exploit their high transfer efficiency without compromising the coating quality. This paper presents the initial results from experimental investigation of sprays from an ESRB which is designed to apply water-borne paint. Water was used as paint surrogate for simplicity. The atomization and transport regions of the spray were investigated using laser light sheet visualizations and phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The experiments were conducted at varying levels of the three important operating parameters: liquid flow rate, shaping-air flow rate, and bellcup rotational speed. The results show that bellcup speed dominates atomization, but liquid and shaping-air flow rate settings significantly influence the spray structure. The visualization images showed that the atomization occurs in ligament breakup regime.
Technical Paper

Transient CFD Simulations of a Bell Sprayer

1998-09-29
982291
A methodology is developed that incorporates high resolution CFD flowfield information and a particle trajectory simulation, aimed at addressing Paint Transfer Efficiency (PTE) for bell sprayers. Given a solid model for the bell sprayer, the CFD simulation, through automeshing, determines a high resolution Cartesian volume mesh (14-20 million cells). With specified values of the initial shaping air, transient and steady-state flow field information is obtained. A particle trajectory visualization tool called SpraySIM uses this complicated flowfield information to determine the particle trajectories of the paint particles under the influence of drag, gravity and electrostatic potential. The sensitivity of PTE on shaping air velocity, charge-to-mass ratio, potential, and particle diameter are examined.
Technical Paper

Pump/Motor Displacement Control Using High-Speed On/Off Valves

1998-09-14
981968
A four valve controller and electronic control circuits were developed to control the displacement of hydrostatic pump/motors (P/M's) utilized in an automobile with a hydrostatic transmission and hydropneumatic accumulator energy storage. Performance of the control system was evaluated. The controller uses four high-speed, two-way, single-stage poppet valves, functioning in the same manner as a 4-way, 3-position spool valve. Two such systems were used to control the displacement of two P/Ms, each system driving a front wheel of the vehicle. The valves were controlled electronically by a distributed-control dead-band circuit and valve driver boards. Testing showed that the control system's time response satisified driving demand needs, but that the control system's error was slightly larger than desired. This may lead to complications in some of the vehicle's operating modes.
Technical Paper

Reverse Engineering of Geometrically Complex Automotive Structures Using X-Ray Computed Tomography and Digital Image Based Finite Element Methods

1998-02-01
981193
Stress analyses of complex automotive components can be nearly impossible to achieve due to extreme difficulties in generating a realistic finite element model. A digital image based finite element approach was used to generate a 3-D finite element model from computed tomography (CT) scans of two automotive transmission cases. For the first case, original CT slices of 1024x1024x208 provided by ARACOR Inc. (Sunnyvale, CA) were used to generate a 3-D finite element model containing nearly 400,000 8-node brick elements. For the second case, 770x870x759 CT slices were used to generate a 3-D finite element model containing approximately 650,000 3-D elements. The mesh data generation from CT data for both cases took 6 minutes each on an engineering workstation. The resulting finite element meshes were analyzed using a specially designed finite element equation solver.
Technical Paper

Laser & Fine Plasma Trimming of Sheet Metal Parts for Low Volume Production

1998-09-29
982333
This study compared laser and fine plasma technology for cutting typical electro-galvanized steel and aluminum automotive stampings. Comparisons were made of various aspects of cut quality, accuracy, disturbance of parent material, cycle time, and capital and operating costs. A sensitivity analysis was included to determine how different scenarios would impact the operating costs. It was found that both processes were capable of high quality cuts at 3800mm/min. Capital savings were achievable through the fine plasma system, but careful consideration of the specific application was essential. This work will allow for an advised comparison of options for sheet metal flexible cutting.
Technical Paper

Application of Fuzzy Classification Methods for Diagnosis of Reject Root Causes in Manufacturing Environment

1998-05-12
981334
This paper presents an approach of using neural network and fuzzy logic methods for the diagnosis of fault root causes in a manufacturing environment. As the first step in this approach, data from all the valid test points were collected and studied based on their statistical characteristics. An information-gain-based procedure was then followed to quantitatively evaluate the relevance of each test point to the diagnosis process. Accordingly, an objective rank of all relevant test points was generated for a particular reject. The root cause of rejects was then identified by a procedure based on an information-gain-weighted radial basis function neural network and a fuzzy multiple voting classification algorithm. This method has been tested with the top five rejects of the transmission main control component at Ford and promising results have been obtained.
Technical Paper

The Reinvention of the Wheel: Progress in Car Radios and Their Future

1990-02-01
900039
Advances in digital and analog electronics have drastically changed car radio circuitry. Improvements in miniaturization of electrical and mechanical components have radically altered their size and styling. Computer modeling of the vehicle's interior environment has optimized car radio acoustics. It seems that the list of modern break-throughs is never ending. It is the intent of this paper to show that many of the technical marvels of today's car radios were first applied years, even decades, ago. From those early concepts, and their current revivals, a projection into the future of automobile radios will be made. As previously mentioned [1]: “If history teaches anything, it teaches the potential for repetition.”
Technical Paper

World Radio Revisited: Still a Myth?

1990-02-01
900040
As in most industries, car radio designers have long envisioned a product which could be sold without modification throughout the world. However, local requirements, performance differences, and customer preferences have presented major obstacles to achieving this goal. Since publishing a previous paper on this subject in 1983, many changes have taken place in electronics and in car radio design. Some of these changes have reduced the barriers to producing a “World Radio” while others have presented new obstacles to be overcome. This paper addresses some of those changes and the current possibilities.
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