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Technical Paper

Environmentally Friendly and Low Cost Manufacturing – Implementation of MQL Machining (Minimum Quantity Lubrication)

2007-04-16
2007-01-1338
Near Dry or Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) Machining eliminates conventional flood coolant from the machining processes. In doing so, MQL reduces oil mist generation, biological contamination of coolant, waste water volume, costs for capital equipment and regulatory permitting. MQL also improves recycling and transport of coolant contaminated chips [1]. Although MQL machining technology has several advantages compared to wet machining, widespread implementation will require a paradigm shift among end-users, machine suppliers, and cutting tool suppliers. Successful implementation of MQL machining requires a high technical understanding and a solid infrastructure to support maintenance and on-going continuous improvement [2].
Technical Paper

A Comparison of the Effect of E85 vs. Gasoline on Exhaust System Surface Temperatures

2007-04-16
2007-01-1392
With concerns over increasing worldwide demand for gasoline and greenhouse gases, many automotive companies are increasing their product lineup of vehicles to include flex-fuel vehicles that are capable of operating on fuel blends ranging from 100% gasoline up to a blend of 15% gasoline/85% ethanol (E85). For the purpose of this paper, data was obtained that will enable an evaluation relating to the effect the use of E85 fuel has on exhaust system surface temperatures compared to that of regular unleaded gasoline while the vehicle undergoes a typical drive cycle. Three vehicles from three different automotive manufacturers were tested. The surface of the exhaust systems was instrumented with thermocouples at specific locations to monitor temperatures from the manifold to the catalytic converter outlet. The exhaust system surface temperatures were recorded during an operation cycle that included steady vehicle speed operation; cold start and idle and wide open throttle conditions.
Technical Paper

Modeling, Validation and Dynamic Analysis of Diesel Pushrod Overhead Bridged Valve Train

2007-04-16
2007-01-1256
A bridged valve train configuration exhibits complex dynamic behavior due to the uniqueness of the special elephant foot/bridge/valve structure. Consequently, this system arrangement presents significant design challenges in system stability at high speed, high load, wear, no-follow and valve seating velocity, etc. An efficient way to gain a thorough understanding of the behavior of this type of valve train system and to drive the valve train design improvement is through the use of an effective dynamic simulation tool. In this paper, an advanced CAE tool developed by Ford Motor Company for the bridged type valve train simulations has been described. This automated CAE tool provides a complete virtual ADAMS-based simulation environment for the pushrod bridged valve train system analysis. This paper also presents the correlation and validation between the simulations and the measurements. The design analysis for the bridged valve train has been discussed briefly in this paper.
Technical Paper

General Motors Hydra-Matic & Ford New FWD Six-Speed Automatic Transmission Family

2007-04-16
2007-01-1095
The Hydra-Matic 6T70 is General Motors first model of a new, two-variant front wheel drive (FWD) six speed automatic transmission family. The second variant is a higher capacity model, the 6T75. The transmission was co-developed with Ford Motor Company. The 6F50 is the Ford variant that aligns with the GM 6T70 transmission. Approximately eighty five percent of the hardware is shared or common between the GM and Ford transmission variants. Ford will also have a higher capacity variant the 6F55 to align with the GM 6T75. The first GM application is the Saturn Aura for the 2007 Model Year. The Ford Edge and Lincoln MKX in MY 2007 will be the first applications for the 6F50. While the Hydra-Matic and Ford FWD six-speed family was designed with two variants in mind, the designed in modularity requires only changes to the second and third axis and case housings depending on specific torque requirements. This modular design enables a tremendous amount of part sharing.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of EGR Treatment on the Emission and Operating Characteristics of Modern Diesel Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-1083
Tests are conducted to improve the use of exhaust gas recirculation on a single cylinder diesel engine with EGR stream treatment techniques that include intake heating, combustible substance oxidation, catalytic fuel reforming, and partial bypass-flow control. In parallel with the empirical work, theoretical modeling analyses are performed to investigate the effectiveness of the reforming process and the combined effects on the overall system efficiency. The research is aimed at stabilizing and expanding the limits of heavy EGR during steady and transient operations so that the individual limiting conditions of EGR can be better identified. Additionally, the heavy EGR is applied to enable in-cylinder low temperature combustion. The effectiveness of EGR treatment on engine emission and operating characteristics are therefore reported.
Technical Paper

Flow Losses at Circular T-Junctions Representative of Intake Plenum and Primary Runner Interface

2004-03-08
2004-01-1414
One of the dominant sources of flow losses in the intake system of internal combustion engines (ICE) with log-style manifolds is the interface between the plenum and primary runner. The present study investigates such losses associated with the dividing flow at the entry to primary runner with geometries representative of those used in ICE. An experimental setup was constructed to measure the flow loss coefficients of T-junctions with all branches of circular cross-section. Experiments were conducted with seven configurations on a steady-flow bench to determine the effects of: (1) interface radius equal to 0, 10, and 20% of the primary runner diameter, (2) plenum to primary runner area ratios of 1, 2.124, and 3.117, and (3) primary runner taper including taper area ratios of 2.124 and 3.117. The last two categories employed 20% interface radii. The total mass flow rate was also varied to investigate the effect of Reynolds number Re on loss coefficients.
Technical Paper

Effects of MMT® Fuel Additive on Emission System Components: Comparison of Clear- and MMT®-fueled Escort Vehicles from the Alliance Study

2004-03-08
2004-01-1084
Emission studies were carried out on clear-fueled and MMT®-fueled 100,000-mile Escort vehicles from the Alliance study [SAE 2002-01-2894]. Alliance testing had revealed substantially higher emissions from the MMT-fueled vehicle, and the present study involved swapping the engine cylinder heads, spark plugs, oxygen sensors, and catalysts between the two vehicles to identify the specific components responsible for the emissions increase. Within 90% confidence limits, all of the emissions differences between the MMT- and Clear-vehicles could be accounted for by the selected components. NMHC emission increases were primarily attributed to the effects of the MMT cylinder head and spark plugs on both engine-out and tailpipe emissions. CO emission increases were largely traced to the MMT cylinder head and its effect on tailpipe emissions. NOx emission increases were linked to the MMT catalyst.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Dual Retard VCT to Continuously Variable Event Valvetrain

2004-03-08
2004-01-1268
Variable cam timing strategies which utilize retard of the intake and exhaust valve events at part load have been previously shown to provide improved fuel consumption and feedgas NOx. These benefits can be increased by enhancing the combustion system with variable charge motion. A variable event duration valvetrain was simulated on engine dynamometer by running a series of short duration/low lift intake valve events. The fuel consumption benefit for this simulated variable event valvetrain is compared to that of dual retard VCT with variable charge motion. An estimated upper limit for the fuel consumption improvement potential of variable valve timing is presented. This upper limit includes both pumping work reduction and indicated efficiency improvement with high levels of exhaust residual dilution. The measured benefits of dual retard VCT and of the variable event valvetrain are compared to the estimated upper limit.
Technical Paper

A New Analysis Method for Accurate Accounting of IC Engine Pumping Work and Indicated Work

2004-03-08
2004-01-1262
In order to improve fuel economy, engine manufacturers are investigating various technologies that reduce pumping work in spark ignition engines. Current cylinder pressure analysis methods do not allow valid comparison of pumping work reduction strategies. Existing methods neglect valve timing effects which occur during the expansion and compression strokes, but are actually part of the gas exchange process. These additional pumping work contributions become more significant when evaluating non-standard valve timing concepts. This paper outlines a new analysis method for calculating the pumping work and indicated work of a 4-stroke internal combustion engine. Corrections to PMEP and IMEP are introduced which allow the valid comparison of pumping work and indicated efficiency between engines with different pumping work reduction strategies.
Technical Paper

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Fuel Economy Measurements and Calculation

2004-03-08
2004-01-1339
Hydrogen Fuel cell vehicles, and techniques for fuel economy measurement and fuel economy calculations are considerably different from those traditionally used fro combustion engine vehicles.. Like gasoline or diesel hybrid vehicles, fuel cell vehicles typically use batteries or other power systems such as super-capacitors for load leveling. Thus, the energy transfer or consumption from these supplemental power sources to the drive train should be compensated for when determining fuel consumption or fuel economy. This paper addresses fuel economy calculations and testing for hybrid hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The impact of supplemental power systems to a fuel cell vehicle's fuel economy and the various methods to derive actual vehicle fuel economy with supplemental power system usage are discussed.
Technical Paper

Control Oriented Model and Dynamometer Testing for a Single-Cylinder, Heated-Air HCCI Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-1129
In recent years, HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) combustion concept has attracted attention due to its potential for high fuel efficiency and low emissions. The essence of HCCI combustion is auto ignition of a very lean, homogeneous air-fuel mixture. However it leads to a major challenge for control engineers – controlling combustion timing to achieve required torque and optimal fuel consumption. There is a need for a simplified HCCI engine model to guide control strategy development. This paper presents such a control oriented model for a “heated intake air” HCCI engine concept that uses two streams of air (cold and hot) to achieve a variable temperature at intake valve closing.
Technical Paper

Verification of Accelerated PM Loading for DPF Qualification Studies

2009-04-20
2009-01-1089
High gas prices combined with demand for improved fuel economy have prompted increased interest in diesel engine applications for both light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. The development of aftertreatment systems for these vehicles requires significant investments of capital and time. A reliable and robust qualification testing procedure will allow for more rapid development with lower associated costs. Qualification testing for DPFs has its basis in methods similar to DOCs but also incorporates a PM loading method and regeneration testing of loaded samples. This paper examines the effects of accelerated loading using a PM generator and compares PM generator loaded DPFs to engine dynamometer loaded samples. DPFs were evaluated based on pressure drop and regeneration performance for samples loaded slowly and for samples loaded under accelerated conditions. A regeneration reactor was designed and built to help evaluate the DPFs loaded using the PM generator and an engine dynamometer.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study of Ultra Low Solidity Airfoil Diffuser in an Automotive Turbocharger Compressor

2009-04-20
2009-01-1470
For the application of advanced clean combustion technologies, such as diesel HCCI/LTC, a compressor with high efficiency over a broad operation range is required to supply a high amount of EGR with minimum pumping loss. A compressor with high pitch of vaneless diffuser would substantially improve the flow range of the compressor, but it is at the cost of compressor efficiency, especially at low mass flow area where most of the city driving cycles resides. In present study, an ultra low solidity compressor vane diffuser was numerically investigated. It is well known that the flow leaving the impeller is highly distorted, unsteady and turbulent, especially at relative low mass flow rate and near the shroud side of the compressor. A conventional vaned diffuser with high stagger angle could help to improve the performance of the compressor at low end. However, adding diffuser vane to a compressor typically restricts the flow range at high end.
Technical Paper

The Particle Emission Characteristics of a Light Duty Diesel Engine by Using Different Pilot Injections

2010-10-05
2010-01-1959
Pilot injection has been used widely in diesel engines for its NOx and noise reducing characteristics. In this paper, its impacts to the particle emissions were studied using a light-duty common-rail Euro 4 diesel engine with different pilot injection strategies. Three steady-state engine modes were selected from the EU legislative diesel engine test cycle to represent low, medium and high engine speeds and loads. The quantities and injection timings of the pilot injection strategies were then varied. The particle number concentration and size distributions were investigated along with the smoke and regulated gas emissions such as the NOx trade-off. These results indicate how a pilot injection alongside a main injection can increase the particle size compared to a single main injection event. Furthermore, the split injection was closely related to the engine mode.
Technical Paper

CFD Modeling of Squeeze Film Flow in Wet Clutch

2011-04-12
2011-01-1236
An oil-lubricated wet clutch has a direct impact on the drivability and fuel economy of a vehicle equipped with an automatic transmission system. However, a reliable analysis of clutch behavior still remains a challenge. The purpose of this study is to advance the state-of the-art in CFD methodology for modeling transient clutch behavior. First, a new iterative scheme is developed, in combination with commercial CFD software, which is capable of simulating the squeeze film process in a wet clutch. The numerical results are then validated using analytical solutions of the Reynolds equation for simplified clutch geometry and various boundary conditions. It is found that the choice of boundary conditions has a strong influence on squeeze film simulation. The iterative scheme is further validated by comparison to clutch engagement experiments.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Air intake Temperature Reduction for Euro V Gaseous Emissions Regulation Compliance

2010-10-06
2010-36-0185
Changes in diesel engine design and calibration contributed to emissions reduction, mainly from Euro III to Euro V the algorithms for the control of smoke and transient response had substantial impact in the calibration concept. In order to follow the diesel engine emissions, the air intake system and air intake cooler must be optimized. The objective of this paper is to show the development of the new air intake package devices design - combined with new CAC (charge air cooler) optimization and new air intake system AIS position in vehicle - to allow intake manifold temperature compliance, using DOE method to the decision.
Technical Paper

Autonomous Driving - A Practical Roadmap

2010-10-19
2010-01-2335
Successful demonstrations of fully autonomous vehicle operation in controlled situations are leading to increased research investment and activity. This has already resulted in significant advancements in the underlying technologies necessary to make it a practical reality someday. Not only are these idealized events sparking imaginations with the potential benefits for safety, convenience, fuel economy and emissions, they also embolden some to make somewhat surprising and sometimes astonishing projections for their appearance on public roads in the near future. Are we now ready for a giant leap forward to the self-driving car with all its complexity and inter-dependencies? Humans will need to grow with and adapt to the technological advancements of the machine and we'll deeply challenge our social and political paradigms before we're done. Even if we as engineers are ready, is the driving public ready?
Journal Article

Investigation of Compressor Whoosh Noise in Automotive Turbochargers

2009-05-19
2009-01-2053
With swelling gasoline prices, automotive OEMs have taken different approaches to improve vehicle fuel economy. One trend is to down-size the engine and to add turbo charging. One of the challenges in utilizing the turbocharger in passenger cars is to control the added NVH issues associated with this hardware, especially for the North American market where turbocharger use is scarce in gasoline engines. In this paper, the authors review an investigation on turbocharger related “whoosh” noise on a V6 engine. The whoosh noise, also called surge noise, is caused by the compressor working at or near surge conditions. Whoosh noise is a broad frequency band flow noise typically found during throttle tip-in conditions, but sometimes found even at steady state driving conditions. The root cause of whoosh noise and the detection methods are discussed in this paper. The countermeasures to reduce whoosh noises are also discussed.
Journal Article

Cruise Controller with Fuel Optimization Based on Adaptive Nonlinear Predictive Control

2016-04-05
2016-01-0155
Automotive cruise control systems are used to automatically maintain the speed of a vehicle at a desired speed set-point. It has been shown that fuel economy while in cruise control can be improved using advanced control methods. The objective of this paper is to validate an Adaptive Nonlinear Model Predictive Controller (ANLMPC) implemented in a vehicle equiped with standard production Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Application and analysis of Model Predictive Control utilizing road grade preview information has been reported by many authors, namely for commercial vehicles. The authors reported simulations and application of linear and nonlinear MPC based on models with fixed parameters, which may lead to inaccurate results in the real world driving conditions. The significant noise factors are namely vehicle mass, actual weather conditions, fuel type, etc.
Technical Paper

Oil Migration on Sheet Steels and the Effect on Performance in Metal Stamping

1999-03-01
1999-01-0682
Mill oils and prelubes are applied by the steel producer to prevent corrosion and to enhance formability. During coiling, shipping, and storage the lubricant migrates due to pressure and gravity. The redistribution of the lubricant results in widely varying lubricant weights. The move to reduce and eliminate press-applied lubricants has lead to concerns that the variation in lubricant weight as a result of this migration would adversely affect press performance. The Drawbead Simulator (DBS) and Twist Compression Test (TCT) were used to evaluate friction response of electrogalvanized and galvanneal sheet to varying lubricant weight. Results showed the electrogalvanized sheet was sensitive to lubricant type while the galvanneal sheet was sensitive to the amount of lubricant.
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