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Technical Paper

Performance Equivalent Thickness of a Sound Insulation System

2013-05-13
2013-01-1981
Vehicle sound insulation systems, such as front of dash mats or carpet assemblies, etc. play a key role in controlling vehicle interior noise. However, dash and carpet insulators are often designed to have varied thickness in compliance with packaging constraints or to fulfill manufacturing clearance requirements. While it is obvious to NVH engineers that thinned-down areas would significantly affect the insulation performance, design engineers would benefit from a quick tool to flag any design details that may negatively impact the performance. This paper therefore proposes a concept called the performance equivalent thickness for the sound insulation system. The aim is to link acoustic performance of an insulator layer to a geometric measure so that the component performance can be easily monitored and preserved at the design stage.
Journal Article

Lightweight Acoustic System Performance Target Setting Process

2013-05-13
2013-01-1982
In the vehicle development process, one important step is to set a component performance target from the vehicle level performance. Conventional barrier-decoupler dash mats and floor trim underlayment systems typically provide sound transmission loss (STL) with minimal absorption. Thus the performance of such components can be relatively easily specified as either STL or Insertion Loss. Lightweight dissipative or multi-layered acoustic materials provide both STL and significant absorption. The net performance is a combination of two parameters instead of one. The target for such components needs to account for this combined effect, however different suppliers use unique formulations and manufacturing methods, so it is difficult and time consuming to judge one formulation against another. In this paper, a unique process is presented to set a component target as a combined effect of STL and absorption.
Technical Paper

Enhanced Acoustic Performance using Key Design Parameters of Headliners

2015-06-15
2015-01-2339
Sound absorption materials can be key elements for mass-efficient vehicle noise control. They are utilized at multiple locations in the interior and one of the most important areas is the roof. At this location, the acoustic treatment typically comprises a headliner and an air gap up to the body sheet metal. The acoustic performance requirement for such a vehicle subsystem is normally a sound absorption curve. Based on headliner geometry and construction, the sound absorption curve shape can be adjusted to increase absorption in certain frequency ranges. In this paper an overall acoustic metric is developed to relate design parameters to an absorption curve shape which results in improved in-vehicle performance. This metric is based on sound absorption coefficient and articulation index. Johnson-Champoux-Allard equivalent fluid model and diffuse field equations are used. The results are validated using impedance tube measurements.
Technical Paper

Headliner Absorption Parameter Prediction and Modeling

2015-06-15
2015-01-2303
The headliner system in a vehicle is an important element in vehicle noise control. In order to predict the performance of the headliner, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the substrate performance, the effect of air gaps, and the contribution from any acoustic pads in the system. Current Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models for predicting absorption performance of acoustic absorbers are based on material Biot properties. However, the resources for material Biot property testing are limited and cost is high. In this paper, modeling parameters for the headliner substrate are identified from a set of standard absorption measurements on substrates, using curve fitting and optimization techniques. The parameters are then used together with thickness/design information in a SEA model to predict the vehicle headliner system absorption performance.
Technical Paper

Acoustic Performance Evaluation of Hood Liner Constructions

2015-06-15
2015-01-2206
In automotive noise control, the hood liner is an important acoustic part for mitigating engine noise. The random incidence absorption coefficient is used to quantify the component level acoustic performance. Generally, air gaps, type of substrate materials, density of the substrate materials and Air Flow Resistivity (AFR) of the cover scrim are the dominant control factors in the sound absorption performance. This paper describes a systematic experimental investigation of how these control factors affect flat sample performance. The first stage of this study is full factorial measurement based on current available solutions from sound absorber suppliers. The acoustic absorption of different hood liner constructions, with variations in materials, density, air gaps, and scrims was measured.
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