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Technical Paper

Material Damping Properties: A Comparison of Laboratory Test Methods and the Relationship to In-Vehicle Performance

2001-04-30
2001-01-1466
This paper presents the damping effectiveness of free-layer damping materials through standard Oberst bar testing, solid plate excitation (RTC3) testing, and prediction through numerical schemes. The main objective is to compare damping results from various industry test methods to performance in an automotive body structure. Existing literature on laboratory and vehicle testing of free-layer viscoelastic damping materials has received significant attention in recent history. This has created considerable confusion regarding the appropriateness of different test methods to measure material properties for damping materials/treatments used in vehicles. The ability to use the material properties calculated in these tests in vehicle CAE models has not been extensively examined. Existing literature regarding theory and testing for different industry standard damping measurement techniques is discussed.
Technical Paper

Estimating Variation in Roof Strength Test

2011-04-12
2011-01-1120
As part of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, requirements for roof strength need to be met for all vehicles. On the other hand, automobile manufactures need to minimize vehicle mass for fuel economy and other objectives. It is important, therefore, for manufacturers to have a good understanding of the sources of variation in measured roof strength. An accurate estimation of such variation is important to achieving these objectives. This paper presents a method of using CAE simulation and vehicle tests to effectively estimate the range of variability in the roof crush tests. A number of vehicle and test variables which could potentially affect the measured roof strength were chosen, and their sensitivity was evaluated through CAE simulation. This knowledge of the sensitivity was then used to design a small number of vehicle tests, producing an estimation of the variation range in roof strength.
Technical Paper

Impact of Motor Capacitance on Vehicle Electrical System Transients

2011-04-12
2011-01-1009
The electrical architecture of today's automobiles employs a significant number of fractional horsepower motors to control wipers, windows, seats, etc. The typical motors are permanent magnet DC brush-commutated motors, often referred to as BM motors. These BM motors, while simple in design, have the inherent issue of creating short-duration, high-frequency electrical noise (caused by the constant interruption, or commutation, of the motor current). This electrical noise can readily lead to radio reception interference. In order to protect against this risk, a typical solution is to install a radio frequency (RF) filter internal to the motor. This filter generally includes a high-frequency ceramic or metal film capacitor across the motor terminals that connect to the vehicle electrical system.
Technical Paper

Hood Slam Process Automator

2011-04-12
2011-01-1066
This paper deals with the development of a Hood Slam Process Automator (PA) to automate the pre-processing tasks of the virtual slam assessment with non-linear Nastran Transient Sol. 129 on all types of hoods. The slam analysis generally consumes a lot of analyst's time for building the slam models, typically six hours and is very tedious and has the potential for errors. The Hood Slam PA will automatically create and perform slam analysis pre-processing tasks within HyperMesh software such as creating latch striker interface, creating seals and bumpers with CBUSH1D elements, assigning transient slam speed to the hood and will finally generate the Nastran non-linear transient (Sol.129) hood slam analysis input files. The ready to run analysis input files will be submitted to the Nastran solver and the analysis results will then be post processed using HyperView software.
Technical Paper

Robust Design of a Light Weight Flush Mount Roof Rack

2011-04-12
2011-01-1274
Roof racks are designed for carrying luggage during customers' travels. These rails need to be strong enough to be able to carry the luggage weight as well as be able to withstand aerodynamic loads that are generated when the vehicle is travelling at high speeds on highways. Traditionally, roof rail gage thickness is increased to account for these load cases (since these are manufactured by extrusion), but doing so leads to increased mass which adversely affects fuel efficiency. The current study focuses on providing the guidelines for strategically placing lightening holes and optimizing gage thickness so that the final design is robust to noise parameters and saves the most mass without adversely impacting wind noise performance while minimizing stress. The project applied Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) techniques to optimize roof rail parameters in order to improve the load carrying capacity while minimizing mass.
Technical Paper

Design, Analysis, and Development Testing of Large Hood Plastic Mounted Trim Components

2011-04-12
2011-01-0490
Large hood mounted plastic trim components are subjected to complex and often extreme loading conditions. Typical loading conditions include solar and thermal cycling, as well as road and powertrain induced vibrations, aero lift and buffeting, and mechanical loads such as car wash. For the above components understanding and classifying the typical loading conditions is an essential and important step in achieving long term quality. This paper discusses different approaches to the design, analysis, development, and testing of plastic trim components. Samples of analysis and test results are presented to demonstrate how to identify and prevent the loss of the part function. Some useful guidelines and practices for addressing thermal expansion, dimensional variation, and redundancy in attachments are also discussed.
Technical Paper

Structural-Acoustic Analysis of Vehicle Body Panel Participation to Interior Acoustic Boom Noise

2011-04-12
2011-01-0496
A structural-acoustic finite element model of an automotive vehicle is developed and applied to evaluate the effect of structural and acoustic modifications to reduce low-frequency ‘boom’ noise in the passenger compartment. The structural-acoustic model is developed from a trimmed body structural model that is coupled with an acoustic model of the passenger compartment and trunk cavities. The interior noise response is computed for shaker excitation loads at the powertrain mount attachment locations on the body. The body panel and modal participation diagrams at the peak response frequencies are evaluated. A polar diagram identifies the dominant body panel contributions to the ‘boom’ noise. A modal participation diagram determines the body modes that contribute to the ‘boom’ noise. Finally, structural and acoustic modifications are evaluated to determine their effect on reducing the ‘boom’ noise and on the overall lower-frequency sound pressure level response.
Technical Paper

Pressure Sensor Simulation Capability for Side Impact Sensing Calibration

2011-04-12
2011-01-0105
There is a growing interest in using pressure sensors to sense side impacts, where the pressure change inside the door cavity is monitored and used to discriminate trigger and non-trigger incidents. In this paper, a pressure sensor simulation capability for side impact sensing calibration is presented. The ability to use simulations for side impact sensing calibration early in the vehicle program development process could reduce vehicle development cost and time. It could also help in evaluating sensor locations by studying the effects of targeted impact points and contents in the door cavity. There are two modeling methods available in LS-DYNA for predicting pressure change inside a cavity, namely airbag method and fluid structure interaction method. A suite of side impact calibration events of a study vehicle were simulated using these two methods. The simulated door cavity pressure time histories were then extracted to calibrate the side sensing system of the study vehicle.
Technical Paper

A Numerical Approach to Evaluate the Aerodynamic Performance of Vehicle Exterior Surfaces

2011-04-12
2011-01-0180
This paper outlines a process to assess the aerodynamic performance of different vehicle exterior surfaces. The initial section of the paper summarizes the details of white-light scanning process that maps entire vehicle to points in Cartesian co-ordinate system which is followed by the conversion of scanned points to theme surface. The concept of point-cloud modeling is employed to generate a smooth theme surface from scanned points. Theme surfaces thus developed are stitched to under-body/under-hood (UB/UH) parts of the base vehicle and the numerical simulations were carried out to understand the aerodynamic efficiency of the surfaces generated. Specifics of surface/volume mesh generated, boundary conditions imposed and numerical scheme employed are discussed in detail. Flow field over vehicle exterior is thoroughly analyzed. A comparison study highlighting the effect of front grilles in unblocked condition along with air-dam on flow field has been provided.
Technical Paper

Safety and Performance Benefits Associated with the Use of a Spotter Mirror: Impact on Driver Lane-Change Planning and Execution

2011-04-12
2011-01-0595
Research was conducted to assess driver acceptance and performance associated with a spotter mirror feature intended to reduce the incidence of lane-change conflicts by enhancing drivers' ability to detect vehicles in their side blind zone. The spotter mirror consisted of an integrated spherical convex blind zone mirror inset within a larger planar mirror. The spotter mirror's field-of-view was designed to target the vehicle's side blind zone area and to help drivers quickly detect the presence or absence of a vehicle in the blind zone. The study captured normative lane-change behavior during an extended drive on public roadways, with and without access to the spotter mirror system, for a sample of familiar and unfamiliar supplemental mirror users. In order to capture more naturalistic lane-change behavior, drivers were informed that the purpose of the study was to evaluate the adequacy of existing road signs for navigating to a destination.
Technical Paper

Factors Moderating the Effectiveness of Rear Vision Systems: What Performance-Shaping Factors Contribute to Drivers' Detection and Response to Unexpected In-Path Obstacles When Backing?

2011-04-12
2011-01-0549
General Motors (GM) and the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) have partnered to conduct a series of studies characterizing the use and effectiveness of technologies designed to assist drivers while backing. A major emphasis of this research has been on Rear Vision Camera (RVC) systems that provide drivers with an enhanced view of the area behind the vehicle. RVC systems are intended to aid in positioning the vehicle when executing low-speed parking and backing-related tasks and are not necessarily well suited for detecting unexpected in-path obstacles (particularly if the RVC image is not coupled with object detection alerts issued to the driver).
Technical Paper

Optimum Constraint Strategy for Liftgates

2011-04-12
2011-01-0766
The present study defines the functional requirements for a liftgate and the body in order to avoid rattle, squeak, and other objectionable noises. A Design For Six Sigma (DFSS) methodology was used to study the impact of various constraint components such as bumpers, wedges, and isolated strikers on functional requirements. These functional requirements include liftgate frequency, acoustic cavity frequency, and the stiffness of the liftgate body opening. It has been determined that the method of constraining the gate relative to the body opening has a strong correlation to the noise generated. The recommended functional performance targets and constraint component selection have been confirmed by actual testing on a vehicle. Recommendations for future liftgate design will be presented.
Technical Paper

Dual Rate Jounce Bumper Design

2011-04-12
2011-01-0791
Jounce bumpers are the primary component by which vertical wheel travel is limited in our suspensions. Typically, the jounce bumper is composed of closed or open cell urethane material, which has relatively low stiffness at initial compression with highly progressive stiffness at full compression. Due to this highly progressive stiffness at high load, peak loads are extremely sensitive to changes in input energy (affected by road surface, tire size, tire pressure, etc.) A “Dual Rate Jounce Bumper” concept is described that reduces this sensitivity. Additionally, various mechanizations of the concept are described as well as the specific program benefits, where applicable.
Technical Paper

Door Check Load Durability - Fatigue Life Prediction

2011-04-12
2011-01-0790
This paper describes an analytical methodology for predicting the fatigue life of a door system for check load durability cycles. A check stop load durability cycle occurs when a customer opens the door beyond the door detent position with a force applied on the check link or hinge check stops. This method combines Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and fatigue code to compute the durability requirements. The FEA model consists of Door-in-White (DIW) on body with integrated hinge check link or independent check link. Nonlinear material, geometric and parts contact were considered for the door with body-in-white (BIW). Several door hinge designs, with integrated and independent check links, were investigated. Using the Von Mises stress and plastic strain from the above analysis, the fatigue life was predicted and compared with the test data. Integrating FEA and fatigue allows predicting the threshold total strain value, which is developed, for check load durability requirements.
Technical Paper

Windshield Wiper System Design Integration

2011-04-12
2011-01-0239
This paper presents development work on the design and analysis of the windshield wiper system. Three design categories are presented: geometrical design, wiper module and motor kinetics, and snow block structural analysis method. A comprehensive structural analysis method is outlined to determine the wiper system capability for continuous operation under a snow blocked condition. By using this design and analysis method, a robust windshield wiper system will be achieved.
Technical Paper

A Displacement-Approach for Liftgate Chucking Investigation

2012-04-16
2012-01-0217
A displacement-based CAE analysis is applied to liftgate chucking noise problems. A CAE simulation model of a small-size sport utility vehicle (SUV) is simulated with a set of realistic road loads as a time transient simulation. The model contains a trimmed vehicle, a liftgate and structural body-liftgate interface components such as the latch-striker wire, contact wedges and slam bumpers. Simulation design of experiments (DOE) is carried out with the model. As performance measures, the relative displacements at the contact points of the interface components are selected, since they are considered the direct cause of liftgate chucking. As design variables, body structure stiffness, liftgate stiffness, liftgate opening stiffness, stiffness characteristics of the interface components and additional liftgate mass are selected. Results of the simulation DOE is post-processed, and response surface models (RSM) are fit for the performance measures.
Technical Paper

Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Natural Convection in a Simplified Engine Bay Enclosure under Soak Conditions

2014-04-01
2014-01-0651
At the onset of soak, air and surface temperatures in an engine bay enclosure are elevated since temperature of heat sources are high while convective cooling is sharply reduced as a result of airflow being shut off from the inlet grilles of the vehicle leading to temperature spikes. Accurate simulation of this important thermal and flow regime that is natural convection driven, highly transient and complex is therefore very important. In this investigation, we simulate flow in the engine bay at the onset of soak with fixed thermal boundary conditions where the geometries representing the engine bay and components are simplified. Good agreement was observed with detailed experimental data available in references for both velocities and temperatures.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study on the Interaction between Flow and Spark Plug Orientation on Ignition Energy and Duration for Different Electrode Designs

2017-03-28
2017-01-0672
The effect of flow direction towards the spark plug electrodes on ignition parameters is analyzed using an innovative spark aerodynamics fixture that enables adjustment of the spark plug gap orientation and plug axis tilt angle with respect to the incoming flow. The ignition was supplied by a long discharge high energy 110 mJ coil. The flow was supplied by compressed air and the spark was discharged into the flow at varying positions relative to the flow. The secondary ignition voltage and current were measured using a high speed (10MHz) data acquisition system, and the ignition-related metrics were calculated accordingly. Six different electrode designs were tested. These designs feature different positions of the electrode gap with respect to the flow and different shapes of the ground electrodes. The resulting ignition metrics were compared with respect to the spark plug ground strap orientation and plug axis tilt angle about the flow direction.
Technical Paper

Root Cause Identification and Methods of Reducing Rear Window Buffeting Noise

2007-05-15
2007-01-2402
Rear Window Buffeting (RWB) is the low-frequency, high amplitude, sound that occurs in many 4-door vehicles when driven 30-70 mph with one rear window lowered. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that the mechanisms of RWB are similar to that of sun roof buffeting and to describe the results of several actions suspected in contributing to the severity of RWB. Finally, the results of several experiments are discussed that may lend insight into ways to reduce the severity of this event. A detailed examination of the side airflow patterns of a small Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV) shows these criteria exist on a small SUV, and experiments to modify the SUV airflow pattern to reduce RWB are performed with varying degrees of success. Based on the results of these experiments, design actions are recommended that may result in the reduction of RWB.
Technical Paper

Windowed Selected Moving Autocorrelation (WSMA), Tri-Correlation (TriC), and Misfire Detection

2005-04-11
2005-01-0647
In this paper, two correlations, Windowed Selected Moving Autocorrelation (WSMA) and Tri-Correlation (TriC), are introduced and discussed. The WSMA is simpler than the conventional autocorrelation. WSMA uses less data points to obtain useful signal content at desired frequencies. The computational requirement is therefore reduced compared to the conventional autocorrelation. The simplified TriC provides improved signal to noise separation capability than WSMA does while still requiring reduced computational effort compared to the standard autocorrelation. Very often, computation resource limitation exists for real-time applications. Therefore, the WSMA and TriC offer more opportunities for real-time monitor and feedback control applications in the frequency domain due to their high efficiencies. As an example, applications in internal combustion (IC) engine misfire detection are presented. Simulation and vehicle test results are also presented in this paper.
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