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Technical Paper

A Study of Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female ATD Chest Accelerometers to Assess Sternum Compression Rate in Chest on Module Driver Out-of-Position Evaluations

2017-03-28
2017-01-1431
Driver out-of-position (OOP) tests were developed to evaluate the risk of inflation induced injury when the occupant is close to the airbag module during deployment. The Hybrid III 5th percentile female Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) measures both sternum displacement and chest acceleration through a potentiometer and accelerometers, which can be used to calculate sternum compression rate. This paper documents a study evaluating the chest accelerometers to assess punch-out loading of the chest during this test configuration. The study included ATD mechanical loading and instrumentation review. Finite element analysis was conducted using a Hybrid III - 5th percentile female ATD correlated to testing. The correlated restraint model was utilized with a Hybrid III - 50th percentile male ATD. A 50th percentile male Global Human Body Model (HBM) was then applied for enhanced anatomical review.
Technical Paper

Safety Belt and Occupant Factors Influencing Thoracic & Upper Abdominal Injuries in Frontal Crashes

2011-04-12
2011-01-1129
This paper reports on a study that examines the effect of shoulder belt load limiters and pretensioners as well as crash and occupant factors that influence upper torso harm in real-world frontal crashes. Cases from the University of Michigan International Center for Automotive Medicine (ICAM) database were analyzed. Additional information was used from other databases including the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) New Car Assessment Program (NCAP), the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS), and patient data available from the University of Michigan Trauma Center. The ICAM database is comprised of information from real-world crashes in which occupants were seriously injured and required treatment at a Level 1 Trauma Center.
Technical Paper

Modeling Human-Machine Interactions Using Statecharts: One Hot and Cool Example

2011-04-12
2011-01-1020
In this paper we discuss the use of a formal approach to the problem of describing, evaluating, and specifying human-machine interaction. The statecharts language, originally conceived by David Harel [1], is used to describe the behavior of the machine (i.e., its states and transitions), interface indications (e.g., light indicators on switches), and user interaction (selecting applications, switching modes, entering parameters, etc.). We illustrate how the statecharts language can be used to describe driver interaction with a climate control system, and show how it is possible to systematically evaluate user interaction. The paper concludes with several observations about the utility of formal language for generating sound design specification of human-machine systems.
Technical Paper

Comprehensive Overview of Human Interface for an Extended Range Electric Vehicle

2011-04-12
2011-01-1023
An Extended Range Electric vehicle brings a wealth of new features since it is capable of driving on battery alone, has a range extending engine, and has a high voltage battery pack that can be recharged by plugging into wall power. The customer is able to interact with the vehicle's plug-in charging system through mobile applications. Along with all these new features is the challenge of designing a driver interface to provide important information to the customer. This paper will describe the unique customer interface features added to the vehicle, and will include some additional specifics related to the hardware used to provide the information.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Acoustic Sensitivity Performance Using Virtual Engineering

2011-04-12
2011-01-1072
In order to assess the possible ways of energy transfer from the various sources of excitation in a vehicle assembly to a given target location, frequency based substructuring technique and transfer path analysis are used. These methods help to locate the most important energy transfer paths for a specific problem, and to evaluate their individual effects on the target, thus providing valuable insight into the mechanisms responsible for the problem. The Source-Path-Receiver concept is used. The sources can be from the road surface, engine, transmission, transfer case, prop-shaft, differential, rotating components, chain drives, pumps, etc., and the receiver can be driver/passenger ears, steering column, seats, etc. This paper is devoted to identify the noise transfer paths and the force transmissibility among the interfaces of different components in the vehicle for the low to mid frequency range.
Technical Paper

Driver Visibility: Customer Insights and Metric Development

2013-04-08
2013-01-1029
In recent years, there has been a growing interest in driver visibility. This is, in part, due to increasing emphasis placed on design factors influencing visibility such as: aerodynamics, styling, structural stiffness and vehicle packaging. During the development process of a vehicle, it is important to be able to quantify all of these factors. Visibility, however, owing to its sensory nature, has been harder to quantify. As a result, General Motors (GM) has undertaken a study to gain deeper insight into customer perceptions surrounding visibility. Clinics were conducted to help determine the relative importance of different metrics. The paper also explores several new metrics that can help predict customer satisfaction based on vehicle configuration.
Technical Paper

Method and System for Determining the Location of a Lost Vehicle Key Fob

2011-04-12
2011-01-0044
Key fobs, also known as remote keys or remote transmitters, have become a common piece of equipment in today's vehicle, being ubiquitous in every market segment. Once limited to remote locking and unlocking operations, today's key fobs can be used to control many comfort and security features beyond locking and unlocking, such as alarm system operation, vehicle locate, approach lighting, memory seat recall, and remote starting systems. Key fobs are designed to be easy to use as well as easy to carry and transport in personal containers, such as purses, pockets, wallets, and the like. Accordingly, as with other personal effects, key fobs and other portable remote devices can be lost or misplaced or can be otherwise difficult to find. Even with careful tracking of a remote device, children and pets, among other factors, can make location difficult. Moreover, multiple remote devices are often distributed with each vehicle.
Technical Paper

Safety and Performance Benefits Associated with the Use of a Spotter Mirror: Impact on Driver Lane-Change Planning and Execution

2011-04-12
2011-01-0595
Research was conducted to assess driver acceptance and performance associated with a spotter mirror feature intended to reduce the incidence of lane-change conflicts by enhancing drivers' ability to detect vehicles in their side blind zone. The spotter mirror consisted of an integrated spherical convex blind zone mirror inset within a larger planar mirror. The spotter mirror's field-of-view was designed to target the vehicle's side blind zone area and to help drivers quickly detect the presence or absence of a vehicle in the blind zone. The study captured normative lane-change behavior during an extended drive on public roadways, with and without access to the spotter mirror system, for a sample of familiar and unfamiliar supplemental mirror users. In order to capture more naturalistic lane-change behavior, drivers were informed that the purpose of the study was to evaluate the adequacy of existing road signs for navigating to a destination.
Technical Paper

Factors Moderating the Effectiveness of Rear Vision Systems: What Performance-Shaping Factors Contribute to Drivers' Detection and Response to Unexpected In-Path Obstacles When Backing?

2011-04-12
2011-01-0549
General Motors (GM) and the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) have partnered to conduct a series of studies characterizing the use and effectiveness of technologies designed to assist drivers while backing. A major emphasis of this research has been on Rear Vision Camera (RVC) systems that provide drivers with an enhanced view of the area behind the vehicle. RVC systems are intended to aid in positioning the vehicle when executing low-speed parking and backing-related tasks and are not necessarily well suited for detecting unexpected in-path obstacles (particularly if the RVC image is not coupled with object detection alerts issued to the driver).
Technical Paper

Small Amplitude Torsional Steering Column Dynamics on Smooth Roads: In-Vehicle Effects and Internal Sources

2011-04-12
2011-01-0560
Internally excited torsional steering wheel vibrations at frequencies near 8-22 Hz on smooth roads can produce driver disturbances, commonly described as “SHAKE”. These vibrations are primarily excited by the rotating front suspension corners and are periodic in the rotational frequencies of the tire-wheel assemblies. The combination of vehicular dynamic amplification originating in dominant suspension and steering system vibratory modes, and a sufficiently large 1st harmonic non-uniformity excitation of the rotating corner components, can result in periodic vibrations exceeding thresholds of disturbance. Controlling the periodic non-uniformity excitation through individual component requirements (e.g., wheel imbalance, tire force variation, wheel runout, concentric piloting of wheel on hub) is difficult since the desired upper limits of individual component requirements for vibration-free performance are typically beyond industry capability.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Occupant Pocketing Kinematics During Whiplash Assessments

2011-04-12
2011-01-0270
This study documents a method developed for dynamically measuring occupant pocketing during various low-speed rear impact, or “whiplash” sled tests. This dynamic pocketing measurement can then be related to the various test parameters used to establish the performance rating or compliance results. Consumer metric and regulatory tests discussed within this paper as potential applications of this technique include, but are not limited to, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) Low Speed Rear Impact (LSRI) rating, Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 202a, and European New Car Assessment Program (EURO-NCAP) whiplash rating. Example metrics are also described which may be used to assist in establishing the design position of the head restraint and optimize the balance between low-speed rear impact performance and customer comfort.
Technical Paper

Thermal Comfort Prediction and Validation in a Realistic Vehicle Thermal Environment

2012-04-16
2012-01-0645
The focus of this study is to validate the predictive capability of a recently developed physiology based thermal comfort modeling tool in a realistic thermal environment of a vehicle passenger compartment. Human subject test data for thermal sensation and comfort was obtained in a climatic wind tunnel for a cross-over vehicle in a relatively warm thermal environment including solar load. A CFD/thermal model that simulates the vehicle operating conditions in the tunnel, is used to provide the necessary inputs required by the stand-alone thermal comfort tool. Comparison of the local and the overall thermal sensation and comfort levels between the human subject test and the tool's predictions shows a reasonably good agreement. The next step is to use this modeling technique in designing and developing energy-efficient HVAC systems without compromising thermal comfort of the vehicle occupants.
Technical Paper

Utilizing Finite Element Tools to Model Objective Seat Comfort Results

2012-04-16
2012-01-0074
The comfort assessment of seats in the automotive industry has historically been accomplished by subjective ratings. This approach is expensive and time consuming since it involves multiple prototype seats and numerous people in supporting processes. In order to create a more efficient and robust method, objective metrics must be developed and utilized to establish measurable boundaries for seat performance. Objective measurements already widely accepted, such as IFD (Indentation Force Deflection) or CFD (Compression Force Deflection) [1], have significant shortcomings in defining seat comfort. The most obvious deficiency of these component level tests is that they only deal with a seats' foam rather than the system response. Consequently, these tests fail to take into account significant factors that affect seat comfort such as trim, suspension, attachments and other components.
Technical Paper

Consumer Sensitivity to Vehicle Interior Component Adjustments

2012-04-16
2012-01-0075
The number of adjustable vehicle interior components features is growing. For example, the number of adjustable components of a vehicle seat has been growing from 4-way to as many as 22-way. The presented study aims to develop understanding on how sensitive drivers and front passengers are to individual component adjustment of vehicle interior features. This understanding could provide insights on which adjustable vehicle interior components features are more important to be precisely adjusted. A commercially available full-size sedan, equipped with a 4-way adjustable steering column & wheel and an 8-way adjustable seat for drivers, and an 8-way adjustable seat for front passengers, was used in this study. A total of 29 and 30 consumers were participating in this study to adjust components to their comfort on driver and front passenger sides, respectively.
Technical Paper

Load Transfer Through Hybrid III Shoulder and its Possible Effect on Chest Acceleration

2011-04-12
2011-01-1096
This paper illustrates that the shoulder complex of the Hybrid III allows a load transfer from the upper extremities that can be associated with an increase of the thoracic spine acceleration. The force transferred by the Hybrid III shoulder and clavicle joints is a result of both inertial forces and contact forces acting on upper extremities. Its possible effect on the 3ms chest injury parameter raises some concerns. First, the Hybrid III shoulder joint compliance has been questioned by other publications. Second, there appears to be no documentation in the literature that supports a relationship between shoulder joint load and chest injury risk in humans. Lastly, kinematics of the upper extremities can vary from test to test, especially between different test facilities, which could contribute to variation of chest response. In this paper, original experimental and simulation data are used to explore this topic.
Technical Paper

Development of the Chevrolet Volt Portable EVSE

2011-04-12
2011-01-0878
The plug-in vehicles developed in the 1990's ushered in the first standards for electrified vehicles. These standards included requirements for Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment or EVSEs. EVSE is a general term for all the non vehicle components needed to charge a plug-in vehicle. These components include cabling, connectors and shock safety equipment. EVSEs are used to charge vehicles at home, work and in commercial settings. Many people identify EVSEs with public charge stations. While public charge stations are iconic with plug-in vehicles, these are just one type of EVSE. Until public EVSEs become readily available, plug-in vehicle drivers will need to partially rely on portable versions of EVSE. Portable EVSEs are required to provide the identical function and safety protection as their stationary cousins but their portability brings unique challenges and design considerations.
Technical Paper

Customer Focus in Ride Development

2013-04-08
2013-01-1355
This paper discusses subjective and objective approaches to quantifying ride performance in three sections: (1) Separates overall ride quality into five components-impact feel, shake, isolation, motion control, and smoothness; (2) Discusses approaches to objectively quantifying ride performance; (3) Provides analytical and test data to illustrate trade-offs in performance between the components of ride. The final section of this paper presents customer clinic data indicating customer preferences for the trade-off balance between ride performance attributes, specifically motion control versus smoothness.
Journal Article

Application of System Safety Engineering Processes to Advanced Battery Safety

2011-04-12
2011-01-1369
The battery system in the Chevrolet Volt is very complex and must balance a variety of performance criteria, including the safety of vehicle occupants and other users. In order to assure a thorough approach to battery system safety, a system safety engineering process was applied and found to provide a useful framework. This methodical approach began with the preliminary hazard analysis and continued through requirements definition, design development and, finally, validation. Potentially hazardous conditions related directly to functional safety (for example, charge control) and primary physical safety (for example, short circuit conditions) can all be addressed in this manner. Typical battery abuse testing, as well as newly defined limit testing, supported the effort. Extensive documentation, traceability and peer reviews helped to verify that all issues were addressed.
Journal Article

Optimal Torque Control for an Electric-Drive Vehicle with In-Wheel Motors: Implementation and Experiments

2013-04-08
2013-01-0674
This paper presents the implementation of an off-line optimized torque vectoring controller on an electric-drive vehicle with four in-wheel motors for driver assistance and handling performance enhancement. The controller takes vehicle longitudinal, lateral, and yaw acceleration signals as feedback using the concept of state-derivative feedback control. The objective of the controller is to optimally control the vehicle motion according to the driver commands. Reference signals are first calculated using a driver command interpreter to accurately interpret what the driver intends for the vehicle motion. The controller then adjusts the braking/throttle outputs based on discrepancy between the vehicle response and the interpreter command.
Journal Article

Response Surface Generation for Kinematics and Injury Prediction in Pedestrian Impact Simulations

2013-04-08
2013-01-0216
This study concerns the generation of response surfaces for kinematics and injury prediction in pedestrian impact simulations using human body model. A 1000-case DOE (Design of Experiments) study with a Latin Hypercube sampling scheme is conducted using a finite element pedestrian human body model and a simplified parametric vehicle front-end model. The Kriging method is taken as the approach to construct global approximations to system behavior based on results calculated at various points in the design space. Using the response surface models, human lower limb kinematics and injuries, including impact posture, lateral bending angle, ligament elongation and bone fractures, can be quickly assessed when either the structural dimensions or the structural behavior of the vehicle front-end design change. This will aid in vehicle front-end design to enhance protection of pedestrian lower limbs.
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