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Technical Paper

External Corrosion Resistance of CuproBraze® Radiators

2001-05-14
2001-01-1718
New technology for the manufacturing of copper/brass heat exchangers has been developed and the first automotive radiators are already in operation in vehicles. This new technology is called CuproBraze®. One of the essential questions raised is the external corrosion resistance with reference to the present soldered copper/brass radiators and to the brazed aluminium radiators. Based on the results from electrochemical measurements and from four different types of accelerated corrosion tests, the external corrosion resistance of the CuproBraze® radiators is clearly better than that of the soldered copper/brass radiators and competitive with the brazed aluminum radiators, especially as regards marine atmosphere. Due to the relatively high strength of the CuproBraze® heat exchangers, down gauging of fins and tubes in some applications is attractive. High performance coatings can ensure long lifetime from corrosion point of view, even for thin gauge heat exchangers.
Technical Paper

LES and RNG Turbulence Modeling in DI Diesel Engines

2003-03-03
2003-01-1069
The one-equation subgrid scale model for the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence model has been compared to the popular k-ε RNG turbulence model in very different sized direct injection diesel engines. The cylinder diameters of these engines range between 111 and 200 mm. This has been an initial attempt to study the effect of LES in diesel engines without any modification to the combustion model being used in its Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) form. Despite some deficiencies in the current LES model being used, it already gave much more structured flow field with approximately the same kind of accuracy in the cylinder pressure predictions than the k-ε RNG turbulence model.
Technical Paper

On the Suitability of a New High-Power Lithium Ion Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications

2003-06-23
2003-01-2289
Due to the low cost of the battery cells and excellent performance at ambient temperature, Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is a promising technology for propulsion applications. However, the performance of Li-ion batteries erodes drastically at extreme temperatures (above 65 °C or below 0 °C). Therefore, in order to maintain battery life and performance, it is crucial to keep the batteries within the temperature range where their operating characteristics are optimal. The need for expensive and complex thermal management systems has in fact kept the Li-ion technology from becoming the first choice for Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) applications. In this paper, we propose a Phase Change Material (PCM) for the temperature control. Due to its high heat capacity, PCM absorbs the heat dissipated by the battery. As long as the heat emitted by the battery does not melt the PCM completely, the system is stable.
Technical Paper

A Modular Approach to Powertrain Modeling and Shift Quality Analysis

1995-02-01
950419
A library of macro modules has been written that represent elements common to powertrains of off-highway equipment with diesel powerplants and powershift transmissions. This library allows users to easily and quickly develop complex models of a wide range of vehicle and transmission configurations. These simulation models can be used to evaluate dynamic loadings on the powertrain components, evaluate shift quality, develop control systems and address other powertrain dynamic problems. The library makes use of EASY5 simulation language features to effectively handle such drivetrain nonlinearities as backlash, coulomb friction and hard stops.
Technical Paper

New Experiments and Computations on the Regenerative Engine

1993-03-01
930063
The results of experiments and computations over a new two-cylinder regenerative cycle engine are reported. Heat regeneration by means of a reticulated ceramic matrix placed inside the combustion chamber was found to be very efficient, with transient, open throttle surface temperatures in excess of 1150°C. In most cases, the matrix caused a premature ignition of the premixed fuel and air. A time-dependent thermodynamic computation of the cycle shows that the cycle cannot produce shaft power as long as premature ignition is present. Different alternatives for engine design and operation are discussed, with basis on the computations. The highest efficiencies can be achieved by cycles where the compression phase is performed by an external compressor. The predicted performance of regenerative engines with direct fuel injection is similar to that of engines burning a premixed fuel-air mixture.
Technical Paper

Equation-Based Compressor and Turbine Modeling for Variable Geometry Turbochargers

2018-04-03
2018-01-0966
As modern engines are being downsized, turbochargers are becoming increasingly common. The operation of turbochargers is usually captured by a map provided by the manufacturer. However, the complexity of these maps makes them difficult to use for turbocharger estimation and control strategies. This work focuses on a method that is able to reduce the compressor and turbine maps from a cloud of points into a set of equations. This is accomplished by defining a series of non-dimensional and normalized variables that define a plane transformation. In this new plane, all the points of the map converge approximately into a line and the equation for this line can be found using a least square regression. While this strategy has been used previously, this work includes additional variables as well as an optimization process, which proved to be better at replicating the original maps than existing methods.
Technical Paper

The Adaptive Cycle Engines

2018-04-03
2018-01-0883
Traditionally, internal combustion engines follow thermodynamic cycles comprising a fixed number of crank revolutions, in order to accommodate compression of the incoming air as well as expansion of the combustion products. With the advent of computer-controlled valve trains, we now have the possibility of detaching compression from expansion events, thus achieving an “adaptive cycle” molded to the performance required of the engine at any given time. The adaptive cycle engine differs from split-cycle engines in that all phases of the cycle take place within the same cylinder, so that in an extreme case the gas contained in all cylinders can be undergoing expansion events, resulting in a large increase in power density over the conventional four-stroke and two-stroke cycles. Key to the adaptive cycle is the addition of a variable-timing “transfer” valve to each cylinder, plus a space for air storage between compression and expansion events.
Technical Paper

In-Cylinder Oxygen Mass Fraction Estimation Method for Minimizing Cylinder-to-Cylinder Variations

2015-04-14
2015-01-0874
Recent developments in advanced combustion engines have demonstrated the potential increases in efficiency and reductions in emissions through low temperature combustion (LTC). These combustion modes often rely on high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), early fuel injection systems, and in some cases a combination of fuels with different reactivities. Despite the advantages of LTC, such operations are highly sensitive to the in-cylinder pre-combustion conditions and face significant challenges in multi-cylinder operation due to cylinder-to-cylinder variations of the combustion process. The cause of cylinder-to-cylinder variations is strongly tied to non-uniform trapped mass. In particular, in-cylinder oxygen concentration plays a critical role in the combustion process of each cylinder and can be leveraged to predict combustion characteristics and to develop control algorithms that mitigate cylinder-to-cylinder variation.
Technical Paper

Conjugate Heat Transfer in CI Engine CFD Simulations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0973
The development of new high power diesel engines is continually going for increased mean effective pressures and consequently increased thermal loads on combustion chamber walls close to the limits of endurance. Therefore accurate CFD simulation of conjugate heat transfer on the walls becomes a very important part of the development. In this study the heat transfer and temperature on piston surface was studied using conjugate heat transfer model along with a variety of near wall treatments for turbulence. New wall functions that account for variable density were implemented and tested against standard wall functions and against the hybrid near wall treatment readily available in a CFD software Star-CD.
Technical Paper

Design, Control, and Power Management of a Battery/Ultra-Capacitor Hybrid System for Small Electric Vehicles

2009-04-20
2009-01-1387
This paper introduces design, control, and power management of a battery/ ultra-capacitor hybrid system, utilized for small electric vehicles (EV). The batteries are designed and controlled to work as the main energy storage source of the vehicle, supplying average power to the load; and the ultra-capacitors are used to meet the peak power demands during transients. Power management system determines the directions of power flow, according to load demand. Presented analyses validate the efficient power management methodology.
Technical Paper

Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements of a Diesel Spray

2008-04-14
2008-01-0942
The current study was focused on flow field measurements of diesel sprays. The global fuel spray characteristics, such as spray penetration, have also been measured. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was utilized for flow field measurements and the global spray characteristics were recorded with high-speed back light photographing. The flow field was scanned to get an idea of the compatibility of PIV technique applied to dense and high velocity sprays. It is well proven that the PIV technique can be utilized at areas of low number density of droplets, but the center of the spray is way beyond the ideal PIV measurement conditions. The depth at which accurate flow field information can be gathered was paid attention to.
Technical Paper

Diesel Spray Penetration and Velocity Measurements

2008-10-06
2008-01-2478
This study is presenting a comparative spray study of modern large bore medium speed diesel engine common rail injectors. One subject of paper is to focus on nozzles with same nominal flow rate, but different machining. The other subject is penetration velocity measurements, which have a new approach when trying to understand the early phase of transient spray. A new method to use velocimetry for spray tip penetration measurements is here introduced. The length where spray penetration velocity is changed is found. This length seems to have clear connection to volume fraction of droplets at gas. These measurements also give a tool to divide the development of spray into acceleration region and deceleration region, which is one approach to spray penetration. The measurements were performed with backlight imaging in pressurized injection test rig at non-evaporative conditions. Gas density and injection pressure were matched to normal diesel engine operational conditions.
Technical Paper

Optical In-Cylinder Measurements of a Large-Bore Medium-Speed Diesel Engine

2008-10-06
2008-01-2477
The objective of this study was to build up an optical access into a large bore medium-speed research engine and carry out the first fuel spray Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the running large bore medium-speed engine in high pressure environment. The aim was also to measure spray penetration with same optical access and apparatus. The measurements were performed in a single-cylinder large bore medium-speed research engine, the Extreme Value Engine (EVE) with optical access into the combustion chamber. The authors are not aware of any other studies on optical spray measurements in large bore medium-speed diesel engines. Successful optical measurements of the fuel spray penetration and the velocity fields were carried out. This confirms that the exceptional component design and laser sheet alignment used in this study proved to be valid for optical fuel spray measurements in large-bore medium-speed diesel engines.
Technical Paper

Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil and Miller Timing in a Medium-Speed CI Engine

2012-04-16
2012-01-0862
The objective of this paper is to analyse the performance and the combustion of a large-bore single-cylinder medium speed engine running with hydrotreated vegetable oil. This fuel has a paraffinic chemical structure and high Cetane number. These features enable achievement of complete and clean combustion with different engine setups. The main benefits are thus lower soot and nitrogen oxides emissions compared to diesel fuel. The facility used in this study is a research engine, where the conditions upstream the machine, the valve timing and the injection parameters are fully adjustable. In fact, the boundary conditions upstream and downstream the engine are freely controlled by a separated supply air plant and by a throttle valve, located at the end of the exhaust pipe. The injection system is common-rail: rail pressure, injection timing and duration are completely adjustable.
Technical Paper

Managing System Performance Data Acquisition Process for Duration and Quality Assurance of Input Data

2015-04-14
2015-01-0486
Performance data offers a powerful tool for system condition assessment and health monitoring. In most applications, a host of various types of sensors is employed and data on key parameters (describing the system performance) is compiled for further analysis and evaluation. In ensuring the adequacy of the data acquisition process, two important questions arise: (1) is the complied data robust and reasonable in representing the system parameters; and (2) is the duration of data acquisition adequate to capture a favorable percentage (say for example 90%) of the critical values of a given system parameter? The issue related to the robustness and reasonableness of data can be addressed through known values for key parameters of the system. This is the information that is not often available. And as such, methods based on trends in a given system parameter, expected norms, the parameter's relation with other known parameters, and simulations can be used to assure the quality of the data.
Technical Paper

Feedforward Control of Fuel Distribution on Advanced Dual-Fuel Engines with Varying Intake Valve Closing Timings

2016-10-17
2016-01-2312
This study examines the dynamics and control of an engine operated with late intake valve closure (LIVC) timings in a dual-fuel combustion mode. The engine features a fuel delivery system in which diesel is direct-injected and natural gas is port-injected. Despite the benefits of LIVC and dual-fuel strategy, combining these two techniques resulted in efficiency losses due to the variability of the combustion process across cylinders. The difference in power production across cylinders ranges from 9% at an IVC of 570°ATDC* to 38% at an IVC of 620 °ATDC and indicates an increasingly uneven fuel distribution as the intake valve remains open longer in the compression stroke. This paper describes an approach for controlling the amount of fuel injected into each cylinders’ port of an inline six- cylinder heavy-duty dual-fuel engine to minimize the variations in fuel distribution across cylinder.
Technical Paper

Hydrocarbon Speciation in Blended Gasoline-Natural Gas Operation on a Spark-Ignition Engine

2016-10-17
2016-01-2169
The high octane rating and more plentiful domestic supply of natural gas make it an excellent alternative to gasoline. Recent studies have shown that using natural gas in dual fuel engines provides one possible strategy for leveraging the advantages of both natural gas and gasoline. In particular, such engines been able to improve overall engine efficiencies and load capacity when they leverage direct injection of the natural gas fuel. While the benefits of these engine concepts are still being explored, differences in fuel composition, combustion process and in-cylinder mixing could lead to dramatically different emissions which can substantially impact the effectiveness of the engine’s exhaust aftertreatment system. In order to explore this topic, this study examined the variations in speciated hydrocarbon emissions which occur for different fuel blends of E10 and compressed natural gas and for different fuel injection strategies on a spark-ignition engine.
Technical Paper

Case Study of an Electric-Hydraulic Hybrid Propulsion System for a Heavy Duty Electric Vehicle

2016-09-27
2016-01-8112
In order to improve efficiency and increase the operation of electric vehicles, assistive energy regeneration systems can be used. A hydraulic energy recovery system is modeled to be used as a regenerative system for supplementing energy storage for a pure electric articulated passenger bus. In this study a pump/motor machine is modeled to transform kinetic energy into hydraulic energy during braking, to move the hydraulic fluid from the low pressure reservoir to the hydraulic accumulator. The simulation of the proposed system was used to estimate battery savings. It was found that on average, approximately 39% of the battery charge can be saved when using a real bus driving cycle.
Technical Paper

Influence of Compression Ratio on High Load Performance and Knock Behavior for Gasoline Port-Fuel Injection, Natural Gas Direct Injection and Blended Operation in a Spark Ignition Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0661
Natural Gas (NG) is an alternative fuel which has attracted a lot of attention recently, in particular in the US due to shale gas availability. The higher hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio, compared to gasoline, allows for decreasing carbon dioxide emissions throughout the entire engine map. Furthermore, the high knock resistance of NG allows increasing the efficiency at high engine loads compared to fuels with lower knock resistance. NG direct injection (DI) allows for fuel to be added after intake valve closing (IVC) resulting in an increase in power density compared to an injection before IVC. Steady-state engine tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine equipped with gasoline (E10) port-fuel injection (PFI) and NG DI to allow for in-cylinder blending of both fuels. Knock investigations were performed at two discrete compression ratios (CR), 10.5 and 12.5.
Technical Paper

The Impact of Intake Valve Dynamics on Knock Propensity in a Dual-Fuel SI Engine

2017-10-08
2017-01-2236
In this study, the impact of the intake valve timing on knock propensity is investigated on a dual-fuel engine which leverages a low octane fuel and a high octane fuel to adjust the fuel mixture’s research octane rating (RON) based on operating point. Variations in the intake valve timing have a direct impact on residual gas concentrations due to valve overlap, and also affect the compression pressure and temperature by altering the effective compression ratio (eCR). In this study, it is shown that the fuel RON requirement for a non-knocking condition at a fixed operating point can vary significantly solely due to variations of the intake valve timing. At 2000 rpm and 6 bar IMEP, the fuel RON requirement ranges from 80 to 90 as a function of the intake valve timing, and the valve timing can change the RON requirement from 98 to 104 at 2000 rpm and 14 bar IMEP.
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