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Technical Paper

Review of Role of Icing Feathers in Ice Accretion Formation

2007-09-24
2007-01-3294
This paper presents a review of our current experimental and theoretical understanding of icing feathers and the role that they play in the formation of ice accretions. It covers the following areas: a short review of past research work related to icing feathers; a discussion of the physical characteristics and terminology used in describing icing feathers; the presence of feathers on ice accretions formed in unswept airfoils, especially at SLD conditions; the role that icing feathers play in the formation of ice accretion shapes on swept wings; the formation of icing feathers from roughness elements; theoretical considerations regarding feather formation, feather interaction to form complex icing structures, the role of film dynamics in the formation of roughness elements and the formation of feathers. Hypotheses related to feather formation and feather growth are discussed.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study to Evaluate Hydro-/Ice-Phobic Coatings for Icing Mitigation over Rotating Aero-engine Fan Blades

2019-06-10
2019-01-1980
Ice accretion on aero-engines, especially on the fan blades, is the very hazardous icing incident due to the potential performance degradation of jet-engines. In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to examine the performance of ice-phobic coatings for jet-engine fan icing mitigation. The experimental study was performed in the unique Icing Research Tunnel at Iowa State University (ISU-IRT) with a scaled engine fan model operated under wet glaze and dry rime ice conditions. To evaluate the effects of anti-icing coatings and to acquire the important details of ice accretion and shedding process on fan blade surfaces, a “phase-locked” imaging technique was applied with a high-resolution imaging system. The power input required to drive the engine fan model rotating at a constant prescribed speed was also measured during the ice accretion experiment.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study to Evaluate the Droplet Impinging Erosion Characteristics of an Icephobic, Elastic Soft Surface

2019-06-10
2019-01-1997
Elastic soft material/surface, such as Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is a perspective, useful and low-cost hydrophobic and icephobic coating. While it has been reported to have good mechanical durability, its erosion durability under the high impacting of water droplets pertinent to aircraft inflight icing phenomena has not been explored. In this study, the droplet imping erosion characteristics of an icephobic PDMS surface/material is evaluated systematically upon the dynamic impinging of water droplets at different impact velocities (~ up to 75m/s), in comparison with other state-of-the-art icephobic materials/surfaces, such as superhydrophobic surface (SHS) and slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS). Surprisingly, the contact angle (CA) of the elastic PDMS is shown to have an over 20° increase (from 105° to 128°), which represents better hydrophobicity, after the erosion test which is mainly contributed to the higher roughness of the eroded PDMS surface.
Technical Paper

An Explorative Study to Use Super-Hydrophilic/Super-Hydrophobic Hybrid Surfaces for Aircraft Icing Mitigation

2019-06-10
2019-01-1995
An explorative study was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel hybrid anti-/de-icing strategy for aircraft icing mitigation. The hybrid method was developed by combining the electro-thermal heating mechanism and specialized surfaces/coatings with different wettabilities. While an electrical film heater was utilized to provide thermal energy around the leading edge of a NACA0012 airfoil model, two different coating strategies, (i.e., (a). Superhydrophobic coating covering the entire airfoil surface to increase droplets bounce-off and accelerate surface water runback vs. (b). super-hydrophilic coating at the leading edge to increase evaporation area + superhydrophobic coating in downstream to prevent runback refreezing) were proposed and evaluated aiming at maximizing the anti-/de-icing efficiency of the hybrid method.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study of Atmospheric Icing Process on Power Transmission Line

2019-06-10
2019-01-2019
Atmospheric icing poses a major threat to power transmission lines in cold regions. In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to examine the atmospheric icing process on high-voltage power transmission lines and characterize the effects of the ice accretion on the aerodynamic forces acting on the transmission lines. The experimental study was conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel available at Iowa State University (ISU-IRT). A cylinder model with the same diameter of commonly-used high-voltage power transmission lines (i.e., D = 29mm) is subjected to a typical glaze icing condition at an incoming wind speed of 20 m/s, a liquid water content (LWC) of 2.0 g/m3 and an ambient temperature of -5 0C. A high-resolution 3D scanner was used in the present study to extract the 3D shapes of the ice structures accreted over surface of the cylindrical test model as a function of the ice accretion time.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study on the Dynamic Ice Accretion Processes on Bridge Cables with Different Surface Modifications

2019-06-10
2019-01-2018
An experimental study was conducted to investigate the dynamic ice accretion processes on bridge cables with different surface modifications (i.e., 1. Standard plain, 2. Pattern-indented surface, and 3. helical fillets). The icing experiments were performed in the unique Icing Research Tunnel available at Iowa State University (i.e., ISU-IRT). In order to reveal the transient ice accretion processes and the associated aerodynamic loadings on the different cable models under the different icing conditions (i.e., rime vs. glaze), while a high-speed imaging system was used to capture the transient details of the surface water transport and ice accretion over the cable surfaces, a high-accuracy dual-transducer force measurement system was also utilized to measure the aerodynamic loadings acting on the ice accreting cable models.
Technical Paper

A Parametric Study on the Thermodynamic Characteristics of DBD Plasma Actuation and Its Potential for Wind Turbine Icing Mitigation

2019-06-10
2019-01-2031
Wind turbine icing represents the most significant threat to the integrity of wind turbines in cold weather. Ice formation on wind turbine blades was found to cause significant aerodynamic performance degradation, resulting in a substantial drop in energy production. Recently developed Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma-based anti-/de-icing systems showed very promising effects for aircraft icing mitigation. In this present study, DBD plasma-based anti-/de-icing systems were employed for wind turbine icing mitigation. First, a comprehensive parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of various DBD plasma actuation parameters on its thermodynamic characteristics. An infrared (IR) thermal imaging system is used to quantitatively measure the temperature distributions over the test plate under various test conditions.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study on the Effects of the Layout of DBD Plasma Actuators on Its Anti-/De-Icing Performance for Aircraft Icing Mitigation

2019-06-10
2019-01-2033
Recently developed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma-based anti-icing systems have shown great potential for aircraft icing mitigation. In the present study, the ice accretion experiments were performed on to evaluate the effects of different layouts of DBD plasma actuators on their anti-/de-icing performances for aircraft icing mitigations. An array of DBD plasma actuators were designed and embedded on the surface of a NACA0012 airfoil/wing model in different layout configurations (i.e., different alignment directions of the plasm actuators (e.g., spanwise vs. streamwise), width of the exposed electrodes and the gap between the electrodes) for the experimental study. The experimental study was carried out in the Icing Research Tunnel available at Iowa State University (i.e., ISUIRT).
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study on a Hot-Air-Based Anti-/De-Icing System for the Icing Protection of Aero-Engine Inlet Guide Vanes

2019-06-10
2019-01-2039
In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize a hot-air-based anti-/de-icing system for the icing protection of aero-engine inlet guide vanes(IGVs). The experimental study was conducted in a unique icing research tunnel available at Iowa State University (i.e., ISU-IRT). A hollowed IGV model embedded with U-shaped hot-air flowing conduit was designed and manufactured for the experimental investigations. During the experiments, while a high-speed imaging system was used to record the dynamic ice accretion or anti-/de-icing process over the surface of the IGV model for the test cases without and with the hot-air supply system being turned on, the corresponding surface temperature distributions on the IGV model were measured quantitatively by using a row of embedded thermocouples.
Technical Paper

Quantification of 3D Ice Structures Accreted on a Wind Turbine Airfoil Model

2019-06-10
2019-01-2030
Accurate quantification of 3D shapes of the complex ice structures accreted on wind turbine blades is highly desirable to develop ice prediction models for more accurate prediction of the aerodynamic performance degradation and power reduction due to the ice accretion on wind turbine blades. In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to quantitatively characterize the 3D shapes of the ice structures accreted over a DU91-W2-250 wind turbine airfoil model in the Icing Research Tunnel available at Iowa State University (ISU-IRT). A glaze icing condition and a rime icing condition that wind turbines usually experience in winter were duplicated by using ISU-IRT. A high-resolution non-intrusive 3D scanning system was used to make detailed 3D-shape measurements to quantify the complicated ice structures accreted on the wind turbine airfoil model as a function of the ice accretion time.
Technical Paper

A Novel Heating-Coating Hybrid Strategy for Wind Turbine Icing Mitigation

2019-06-10
2019-01-2029
The electro-thermal method is most commonly used for wind turbine anti-/de-icing. The upmost drawback of such systems is the high power consumption. In the present study, we proposed to use a durable slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS) to effectively reduce the power requirement of the heating element during the anti-/de-icing process. The explorative study was conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at Iowa State University (ISU-IRT) with a DU91-W2-250 wind turbine blade model exposed under severe icing conditions. During the experiments, while a high-speed imaging system was used to record the dynamic ice accretion process, an infrared (IR) thermal imaging system was also utilized to achieve the simultaneous surface temperature measurements over the test model.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Mode-II Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Ice/Metal Interfaces

2019-06-10
2019-01-1947
Airborne, marine and ground structures are vulnerable to atmospheric icing in cold weather operation conditions. Most of the ice adhesion-related work have focused on the mechanical ice removal strategies because of practical considerations, while limited literature is available for fundamental understanding of the ice adhesion process. Here, we present a fracture mechanics-based approach to characterize interfacial fracture parameters for the shear behavior of a typical ice/aluminum interface. An experimental framework employing two complementary tests (1) lap shear and (2) shear push-out tests was introduced to assess the mode-II fracture parameters for the selected aluminum/ice interface. Both analytical (shear-lag analysis) and numerical (finite element analysis incorporating cohesive zone method) models were used to evaluate shear fracture parameters.
Technical Paper

Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Ice Adhesion Using the Blister Test

2019-06-10
2019-01-1948
Structures in cold weather environments are susceptible to atmospheric ice formation. A fracture mechanics based approach is proposed for in situ characterization of the interfacial fracture energy of ice on different substrates. This paper summarizes the development of the experimental and analytical framework to measure the ice adhesion energy, calibrated on static ice. The testing configuration utilizes a shaft-loaded blister test to produce stable crack propagation, from a well-defined pre-crack at the interface of the ice layer and the substrate. Measurements of the fracture energy are taken over a range of ice thicknesses and surface roughnesses. The developed analytical framework to estimate adhesion energy are verified and calibrated via finite element numerical simulation of the proposed geometric configuration and employing cohesive surfaces along the interface to simulate the crack nucleation and propagation process.
Technical Paper

Utilization of Single Cantilever Beam Test for Characterization of Ice Adhesion

2019-06-10
2019-01-1949
Many engineering systems operating in a cold environment are challenged by ice accretion, which unfavorably affects their aerodynamics and degrades both their performance and safety. Precise characterization of ice adhesion is crucial for an effective design of ice protection system. In this paper, a fracture mechanics-based approach incorporating single cantilever beam test is used to characterize the near mode-I interfacial adhesion of a typical ice/aluminum interface with different surface roughness. In this asymmetric beam test, a thin layer of ice is formed between a fixed and elastically deformable beam subjected to the applied loading. The measurements showed a range of the interfacial adhesion energy (GIC) between 0.11 and 1.34 J/m 2, depending on the substrate surface roughness. The detailed inspection of the interfacial ice fracture surface, using fracture surface replication technique, revealed a fracture mode transition with the measured macroscopic fracture toughness.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of a Wind-Driven Water Droplet over the Slippery Liquid Infused Porous Surface

2019-06-10
2019-01-1951
The promising anti-icing performance of the slippery liquid infused porous surface (SLIPS) has been recently demonstrated for various engineering applications. The runback icing for aircraft and wind turbines could be effectively mitigated considering the timely removal of water droplet by the wind shearing force due to the low adhesion on the SLIPS. In this study, the flow field both inside and around the wind-driven droplet over the SLIPS was experimentally investigated by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. Previous studies majorly focus on the internal flow pattern before the droplet incipient motion. In this study, the flow field inside a moving droplet was firstly investigated. As a result of the low surface adhesion of the SLIPS, droplet oscillations were eliminated and the droplet internal flow field could be corrected from the optical distortion.
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