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Technical Paper

NVH Analysis of Balancer Chain Drives with the Compliant Sprocket of the Crankshaft with a Dual-Mass Flywheel for an Inline-4 Engine

2007-05-15
2007-01-2415
The work presented in this paper outlines the design and development of a compliant sprocket for balancer drives in an effort to reduce the noise levels related to chain-sprocket meshing. An experimental observation of a severe chain noise around a resonant engine speed with the Dual-Mass Flywheel (DMF) and standard build solid (fixed) balancer drive sprocket. Torsional oscillation at the crankshaft nose at full load is induced by uneven running of crankshaft with a dual-mass flywheel system. This results in an increase of the undesirable impact noise caused by the meshing between the chain-links and the engagement/disengagement regions of sprockets, and the clatter noise from the interaction between the vibrating chain and the guides. This paper evaluates and discusses the benefits that the compliant sprocket design provided. A multi-body dynamics system (MBS) model of the balancer chain drive has been developed, validated, and used to investigate the chain noise.
Technical Paper

Gear Mesh Excitation Models for Assessing Gear Rattle and Gear Whine of Torque Transmission Systems with Planetary Gear Sets

2007-05-15
2007-01-2245
This paper presents four methodologies for modeling gear mesh excitations in simple and compound planetary gear sets. The gear mesh excitations use simplified representations of the gear mesh contact phenomenon so that they can be implemented in a numerically efficient manner. This allows the gear mesh excitations to be included in transmission system-level, multibody dynamic models for the assessment of operating noise and vibration levels. After presenting the four approaches, a description is made regarding how they have been implemented in software. Finally, example models are used to do a comparison between the methods
Technical Paper

Investigation of Gravel Noise Mechanisms and Impact Noise Transfer

2007-05-15
2007-01-2274
Impact noise, inside a car, due to tire-launched gravel on the road can lead to loss of quality perception. Gravel noise is mainly caused by small-sized particles which are too small to be seen on the road by the driver. The investigation focuses on the identification of the mechanisms of excitation and transfer. The spatial distribution of the particles flying from a tire is determined, as well as the probable impact locations on the vehicle body-panels. Finally the relative noise contributions of the body-panels are estimated by adding the panel-to-ear transfer functions. This form of Transfer-Path-Analysis allows vehicle optimization and target setting on the level of the tires, exterior panel treatment and isolation.
Technical Paper

Sound Quality Equivalent Modeling for Virtual Car Sound Synthesis

2001-04-30
2001-01-1540
The pressure on development cycles in the automotive industry forces the acoustical engineers to create awareness of sound quality in the early stages of development, perhaps even before a physical prototype is available. Currently, designers have few tools to help them listen to their “virtual” models. For the design of a synthesis platform of in-vehicle binaural sound, the sound should be modeled with almost identical sound quality perception. A concept is presented where the total sound of a vehicle is split in a number of components, each with its own sound characteristics. These characteristics are described in a signal model that allows the analysis of an existing sound into a limited number of signal components: orders-frequency spectra, time envelopes and time recordings.
Technical Paper

A Sound Quality System for Engineers

2001-03-05
2001-01-3834
In the eighties, the main concern in the automotive industry from a designer's standpoint was a level issue. In the nineties, the market has put more stringent requirements on the automotive industry with respect to noise in general and psychoacoustics. The governments have imposed lower limits with respect to pass-by noise standards. Customers are spending more time in their car than in the past and are demanding acoustical comfort. All of this is leading to an environment where a sound quality system is becoming a daily tool in the design and trouble-shooting world. This paper describes what should be looked for in a sound, how to quantify these properties and what tools are needed. These steps are then applied in a case study.
Technical Paper

Advances in Industrial Modal Analysis

2001-03-05
2001-01-3832
One of the scientific fields where, for already more than 20 years, system identification plays a crucial role is this of structural dynamics and vibro-acoustic system optimization. The experimental approach is based on the “Modal Analysis” concept. The present paper reviews the test procedure and system identification principles of this approach. The main focus though is on the real problems with which engineers, performing modal analysis on complex structures on a daily basis, are currently confronted. The added value of several new testing approaches (laser methods, smart transducers…) and identification algorithms (spatial domain, subspace, maximum likelihood,..) for solving these problems is shown. The discussed elements are illustrated with a number of industrial case studies.
Technical Paper

Numerical Modeling of Engine Noise Radiation through the use of Acoustic Transfer Vectors - A Case Study

2001-04-30
2001-01-1514
This paper presents the numerical modeling of noise radiated by an engine, using the so-called Acoustic Transfer Vectors and Modal Acoustic Transfer Vectors concept. Acoustic Transfer Vectors are input-output relations between the normal structural velocity of the radiating surface and the sound pressure level at a specific field point and can thus be interpreted as an ensemble of Acoustic Transfer Functions from the surface nodes to a single field point or microphone position. The modal counter part establishes the same acoustic transfer expressed in modal coordinates of the radiating structure. The method is used to evaluate the noise radiated during an engine run-up in the frequency domain. The dynamics of the engine is described using a finite element model loaded with a rpm-dependent excitation. The effectiveness of the method in terms of calculation speed, compared with classical boundary element methods, is illustrated.
Technical Paper

A Steel Solution for a Firewall Using a Hybrid Test/CAE Approach

2009-04-20
2009-01-1547
The firewall design of a BMW1 is optimized for interior noise and weight using a Hybrid Interior Noise Synthesis (HINS) approach. This method associates a virtual firewall with a test based body model. A vibro-acoustic model of the firewall panel, including trim elements and full vehicle boundary conditions, is used for predictions in the 40 Hz - 400 Hz range. The short calculation time of this set-up allows multiple design iterations. The firewall noise is reduced by 0.9 dB and its mass by 5.1% through structural changes. Crashworthiness is maintained at its initial level using advanced steel processing. The total interior noise shows improvement in the 90 Hz - 140 Hz range.
Technical Paper

Radiated Fuel Tank Slosh Noise Simulation

2011-04-12
2011-01-0495
With the introduction of hybrid vehicles and the associated elimination of engine and exhaust masking noises, sounds from other sources is becoming more noticeable. Fuel tank sloshing is one of these sources. Fuel sloshing occurs when a vehicle is accelerated in any direction and can create noise that may be perceived as a quality issue by the customer. To reduce slosh noise, a fuel tank has to be carefully designed. Reduction in slosh noise using test- based methods can be very costly and timely. This paper shows how, using the combination of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic), FE (Finite Element) and Acoustic simulation methods, the radiated fuel tank slosh noise performance can be evaluated using CAE methods. Although the de-coupled fluid /structure interaction (FSI) method was used for the examples in this paper, the acoustic simulation method is not limited to the decoupled FSI method.
Technical Paper

Time-Domain Source Contribution Analysis Method for In-Room Pass-By Noise

2011-05-17
2011-01-1609
This paper presents a new time-domain source contribution analysis method for in-room pass-by noise. The core of the method is a frequency-domain ASQ model (Airborne Source Quantification) representing each noise generating component (engine, exhaust, left and right tyres, etc.) by a number of acoustic sources. The ASQ model requires the measurement of local FRF's and acoustic noise transfer functions to identify the operational loads from nearby pressure indicator responses and propagate the loads to the various target microphones on the sides of the vehicle. Once a good ASQ model is obtained, FIR filters are constructed, allowing a time-domain synthesis of the various source contributions to each target microphone. The synthesized target response signals are finally recombined into a pass-by sound by taking into account the speed profile of the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Synthesis of Drive-by Noise Based on Numerically Evaluated Source-Receiver Transfer Functions Employing the FMBEM

2011-05-17
2011-01-1610
Prediction of the drive-by noise level in the early design stage of an automotive vehicle is feasible if the source signatures and source-receiver transfer functions may be determined from simulations based on the available CAD/CAE models. This paper reports on the performance of a drive-by noise synthesis procedure in which the transfer functions are numerically evaluated by employing the Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method (FMBEM). The proposed synthesis procedure first computes the steady-state receiver contributions of the sources as appearing from a number of vehicle positions along the drive path. In a second step, these contributions are then combined into a single transient signal from a moving vehicle for each source-receiver pair by means of a travel time correction.
Technical Paper

Noise Contribution Analysis at Suspension Interfaces Using Different Force Identification Techniques

2011-05-17
2011-01-1600
Road-tire induced vibrations are in many vehicles determining the interior noise levels in (semi-) constant speed driving. The understanding of the noise contributions of different connections of the suspension systems to the vehicle is essential in improvement of the isolation capabilities of the suspension- and body-structure. To identify these noise contributions, both the forces acting at the suspension-to-body connections points and the vibro-acoustic transfers from the connection points to the interior microphones are required. In this paper different approaches to identify the forces are compared for their applicability to road noise analysis. First step for the force identification is the full vehicle operational measurement in which target responses (interior noise) and indicator responses (accelerations or other) are measured.
Technical Paper

On-Line Sound Brush Measurement Technique for 3D Noise Emission Studies

2013-05-13
2013-01-1973
A key issue in noise emission studies of noise producing machinery concerns the identification and analysis of the noise sources and their interaction and radiation into the far field. This paper presents a new acoustic measurement technique for noise source identification in stationary applications. The core of the technology is a handheld measurement instrument combining a position and orientation tracking device with a 3D sound intensity probe. The technique allows an on-line 3D visualization of the sound field while moving the probe freely around the test object. By focusing on the areas of interest, troublesome areas can be identified that require further in-depth analysis. The measurement technique is flexible, interactive and widely applicable in industrial applications. This paper explains the working principle and characteristics of this new technology and positions it to existing methods like traditional sound intensity testing and array techniques.
Technical Paper

Quantification of Intake System Noise Using an Experimental Source-Transfer-Receiver Model

1999-05-17
1999-01-1659
Design optimisation with respect to interior noise is currently a topic of great concern for the automotive industry. An essential element in this process is to obtain a correct understanding of the various noise sources which are present, and the ways in which these sources propagate to the critical receiver. An experimental source-transfer-receiver methodology is presented, that allows quantifying the structure borne and airborne source strength of the intake system components and its contribution to the interior noise. The method allows interior noise optimisation after identification of the dominant contributors. The methodology is applied to identify the noise contribution of the air intake system to the interior noise of an 8-cylinder upper class vehicle. Correlation of the Structure Borne Transfer Path Analysis and Airborne Source Quantification models with physical decoupling experiments demonstrates a high correspondence.
Technical Paper

Development of Hybrid Model for Powerplant Vibration

1999-05-17
1999-01-1656
This paper covers the application of hybrid vibro-acoustic simulation methods to shorten the design cycle of power-plant components. A comparison is made between Frequency Response Function based and Modal based algorithms for the generation of a predictive powerplant assembly model. The effectiveness of design modifications is evaluated by loading the original and modified predictive models with experimentally identified excitation forces. The procedure is validated by correlation with experimental data.
Technical Paper

Structural Modelling of Car Panels Using Holographic Modal Analysis

1999-05-17
1999-01-1849
In order to optimise the vibro-acoustic behaviour of panel-like structures in a more systematic way, accurate structural models are needed. However, at the frequencies of relevance to the vibro-acoustic problem, the mode shapes are very complex, requiring a high spatial resolution in the measurement procedure. The large number of required transducers and their mass loading effects limit the applicability of accelerometer testing. In recent years, optical measuring methods have been proposed. Direct electronic (ESPI) imaging, using strobed continuous laser illumination, or more recently, pulsed laser illumination, have lately created the possibility to bring the holographic testing approach to the level of industrial applicability for modal analysis procedures. The present paper discusses the various critical elements of a holographic ESPI modal testing system.
Journal Article

Fatigue Life Simulation on Fiber Reinforced Composites - Overview and Methods of Analysis for the Automotive Industry

2012-04-16
2012-01-0730
The need of weight reduction for fuel reduction and CO₂ regulations enforces the use of light-weight materials for structural parts also. The importance of reinforced composites will grow in this area. While the structural behavior and the simulation up to high strain-rate processes for those materials have been in the focus of investigation for many years, nowadays the simulation of high cycle fatigue behavior is getting important as well. Efficient fatigue analysis for metals was developed by understanding the microscopic behavior (crack nucleation and initiation) and bringing it to the macroscopic level by combining it with the matching test data (SN curves, etc.). Similar approaches can be applied to composite materials as well.
Journal Article

Modeling and Simulation of Torsional Vibration of the Compliant Sprocket in Balance Chain Drive Systems

2008-06-23
2008-01-1529
The work presented in this paper outlines the development of a simulation model to aid in the design and development of a compliant sprocket for balancer drives. A design with dual-mass flywheel and a crank-mounted compliant chain sprocket greatly reduces interior noise levels due to chain meshing. However, experimental observations showed the compliant sprocket can enter into resonance and generate excessive vibration energy during startup. Special features are incorporated into the compliant sprocket design to absorb and dissipate this energy. Additional damper spring rate, high hysteresis and large motion angle that overlap the driving range may solve the problem during engine start-up period. This work develops a simulation model to help interpret the measured data and rank the effectiveness of the design alternatives. A Multibody dynamics system (MBS) model of the balancer chain drive has been developed, validated, and used to investigate the chain noise.
Technical Paper

Prediction of System-Level Gear Rattle Using Multibody and Vibro-Acoustic Techniques

2004-09-27
2004-32-0063
The objective of this paper is to present the development and the use of a numerical model to predict noise radiated from manual gearboxes due to gear rattle using Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) technologies. This CAE process, as outlined in this paper, includes measured data, computational flexible multibody dynamics, and vibro-acoustic analysis. The measured data is used to identify and reproduce the input excitation which is primarily generated from engine combustion forces. The dynamic interaction of the gearbox components, including flywheel, input/output shafts, contacting gear-pairs, bearings, and flexible housing is modeled using flexible multibody techniques. The acoustic response to the vibration of the gearbox housing is then predicted using vibro-acoustic techniques. These different technologies are augmented together to produce a virtual gearbox that can be used in noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) performance evaluations.
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