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Technical Paper

Compression Ratio and Coolant Temperature Effects on HC Emissions from a Spark- Ignition Engine

1995-02-01
950163
Modern four-valve engines are running at ever higher compression ratios in order to improve fuel efficiency. Hotter cylinder bores also can produce increased fuel economy by decreasing friction due to less viscous oil layers. In this study changes in compression ratio and coolant temperature were investigated to quantify their effect on exhaust emissions. Tests were run on a single cylinder research engine with a port-deactivated 4-valve combustion chamber. Two compression ratios (9.15:1 and 10.0:1) were studied at three air/fuel ratios (12.5, 14.6 and 16.5) at a part load condition (1500 rpm, 3.8 bar IMEP). The effect of coolant temperature (66 °C and 108°C) was studied at the higher compression ratio. The exhaust was sampled and analyzed for both total and speciated hydrocarbons. The speciation analysis provided concentration data for hydrocarbons present in the exhaust containing twelve or fewer carbon atoms.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Exhaust Particle Size Distributions: A Comparison of Tailpipe and Dilution Tunnel Measurements

1999-05-03
1999-01-1461
This paper explores the extent to which standard dilution tunnel measurements of motor vehicle exhaust particulate matter modify particle number and size. Steady state size distributions made directly at the tailpipe, using an ejector pump, are compared to dilution tunnel measurements for three configurations of transfer hose used to transport exhaust from the vehicle tailpipe to the dilution tunnel. For gasoline vehicles run at a steady 50 - 70 mph, ejector pump and dilution tunnel measurements give consistent results of particle size and number when using an uninsulated stainless steel transfer hose. Both methods show particles in the 10 - 100 nm range at tailpipe concentrations of the order of 104 particles/cm3.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Air/Fuel Ratio on Wide Open Throttle HC Emissions from a Spark-Ignition Engine

1994-10-01
941961
Currently most automotive manufacturers calibrate for rich air/fuel ratios at wide open throttle which produces lower exhaust gas temperatures. Future federal emissions regulations may require less enrichment under these conditions. This study was undertaken to address the question of what happens to engine-out hydrocarbon emissions with different air/fuel ratios at wide open throttle. Tests were run on a single cylinder research engine with a two valve combustion chamber at a compression ratio of 9:1. The test matrix included three air/fuel ratios (10.5, 12.5 and 14.5) and two speeds (1500 and 3000 rpm) at wide open throttle as well as three air/fuel ratios (12.5, 14.6 and 16.5) at a part load condition (1500 rpm, 3.8 bar IMEP). The exhaust was sampled and analyzed for both total and speciated hydrocarbons. The speciation analysis provided concentration data for hydrocarbons present in the exhaust containing twelve or fewer carbon atoms.
Technical Paper

Particulate Matter Emission During Start-up and Transient Operation of a Spark-Ignition Engine (2): Effect of Speed, Load, and Real-World Driving Cycles

2000-03-06
2000-01-1083
Previous research into Particulate Matter (PM) emissions from a spark-ignition engine has shown that the main factor determining the how PM emissions respond to transient engine operating conditions is the effect of those conditions on intake port processes such as fuel evaporation. The current research extends the PM emissions data base by examining the effect of transient load and speed operating conditions, as well as engine start-up and shut-down. In addition, PM emissions are examined during “real-world” driving conditions - specifically, the Federal Test Procedure. Unlike the previous work, which was performed on an engine test stand with no exhaust gas recirculation and with a non-production engine controller, the current tests are performed on a fully-functional, production vehicle operated on a chassis dynamometer to better examine real world emissions.
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