Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 2 of 2
Technical Paper

The Relationship Between Vertical Velocity and Roof Crush in Rollover Crashes

1998-02-23
980211
Rollover accidents account for a large number of serious to fatal injuries annually. In the past, these injuries were often the result of unrestrained occupant ejection. Subsequent to mandatory belt use laws, a larger percentage of these injuries occur inside the vehicle, and the head and neck areas sustain a substantial number of these injuries. Rollovers have been characterized as violent events, roof crush as the natural consequence of such violence. Further, head and neck injury have been thus considered unavoidable, even with occupant use of the production restraints. This paper will describe the relationship between the three dimensional extent (severity) of roof crush and the equivalent drop test contact velocity as derived from physical experiments and tests. The drop test contact velocity is directly related to the cumulative change of velocity experienced by a vehicle as a result of roof contact deformation during a rollover accident by validated computer simulations.
Technical Paper

Roof Crush Versus Occupant Injury From 1988 to 1992 NASS

1998-02-23
980210
Rollover accidents account for a large number of serious to fatal injuries annually. In the past, these injuries were often the result of unrestrained occupant ejection. Subsequent to mandatory belt use laws, a larger percentage of these injuries occur inside the vehicle, and the head and neck areas sustain a substantial number of these injuries. An analytical effort to understand rollover injuries, using the field accident data of the NASS files and residual headroom as an indicator, was reported by the authors at the 1996 ESV conference in Melbourne, Australia. This paper describes the relationship between roof crush and restrained occupant injury in rollover accidents as derived from the analysis of 1988-1992 NASS files. It extends the residual headroom parameter to the entire population of head, face and neck occupants injured inside the compartment.1
X