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Catalyzed Particulate Filter Passive Oxidation Study with ULSD and Biodiesel Blended Fuel

2012-06-18
A 2007 Cummins ISL 8.9L direct-injection common rail diesel engine rated at 272 kW (365 hp) was used to load the filter to 2.2 g/L and passively oxidize particulate matter (PM) within a 2007 OEM aftertreatment system consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and catalyzed particulate filter (CPF). Having a better understanding of the passive NO2 oxidation kinetics of PM within the CPF allows for reducing the frequency of active regenerations (hydrocarbon injection) and the associated fuel penalties. Being able to model the passive oxidation of accumulated PM in the CPF is critical to creating accurate state estimation strategies. The MTU 1-D CPF model will be used to simulate data collected from this study to examine differences in the PM oxidation kinetics when soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel is used as the source of fuel for the engine.
Technical Paper

Emissions Performance of Bi-fuel CNG and Bi-fuel LPG Passenger Cars Using Sequential Multi-point Injection Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-1195
This paper describes a study into the emissions performance of a passenger car running on natural gas and liquified petroleum gas. The gasoline engine was modified to allow the introduction of the alternative fuels into the engine. The effect of fuel system hardware on emissions was investigated. Modifications were carried out to the gasoline EMS to allow control of the alternative fuel systems. A number of changes were made to the gasoline calibration to allow operation on the alternative fuels. Emissions tests were conducted on commercial grade natural gas and liquid petroleum gas. The results were compared with gasoline emission results of an equivalent vehicle.
Technical Paper

Flow-Acoustic Coupling in Quarter-Wave Resonators Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

2001-04-30
2001-01-1430
Quarter-wave resonators are commonly used as acoustic silencers in automotive air induction systems. Similar closed side branches can also be formed in the idle air bypass, exhaust gas recirculation, and positive crankcase ventilation systems of engines. The presence of a mean flow across these side branches can lead to an interaction between the mean flow and the acoustic resonances of the side branch. At discrete flow conditions, this coupling between the flow and acoustic fields may produce high amplitude acoustic pressure pulsations. For the quarter-wave resonator, this interaction can turn the silencer into a noise generator, while for systems where a valve is located at the closed end of the side branch the large pressure pulsations can cause the valve to fail. This phenomenon is not limited to automotive applications, and also occurs in natural gas pipelines, aircraft, and numerous other internal and external flows.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Some Alternative Diesel Fuels for Low Emissions and Improved Fuel Economy

2001-03-05
2001-01-0149
This paper reports on Ford's participation in the PNGV ‘Ad Hoc’ Diesel Fuel Test program - Phase I. The purpose of this program was to assess the potential benefits of various fuel properties aimed at reducing engine-out emissions of NOx and particulates to meet LEV2 and Tier 2 emission standards. Four alternative fuels were evaluated using a Ford 1.2L DIATA diesel engine: 1) California Certification fuel (CARB), 2) low sulfur hydro-cracked fuel (LSHC), 3) LSHC fuel with a 15% Dimethoxy Methane blend (DMM), and 4) neat Fischer-Tropsch (FT100) fuel. Design of Experiments (DOE) and conventional techniques were used to evaluate the fuels at five speed and load conditions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), injection rail pressure, and beginning of injection (BOI) timing were controlled during the tests. Steady-state engine performance, emissions, and cylinder pressure (combustion) data were recorded for each fuel.
Technical Paper

Flame Temperature Correlation of Emissions from Diesels Operated on Alternative Fuels

2001-05-07
2001-01-2014
Work by Plee, Ahmad, and coworkers in the 1980s [1, 2, 3, 4 and 5] showed that for changes in intake air state, Diesel NOx, soot, soluble organic fraction, and HC emissions could be correlated using the stoichiometric flame temperature calculated at SOC or peak pressure conditions. In the present work, similar flame temperature correlations are obtained for emissions from three test engines; a 1.2L high speed direct injection (HSDI) Diesel, a 2.4L HSDI Diesel, and a 2.34 L single cylinder direct injection (DI) Diesel engine, the first of which was tested using four alternative fuels. Use of the flame temperature correlations presented may reduce the number of engine tests required to evaluate the effects of EGR on emissions of NOx, particulate, and HC, even when alternative fuels are used.
Technical Paper

FordS Zero Emission P2000 Fuel Cell Vehicle

2000-11-01
2000-01-C046
The P2000 Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle developed by Ford Motor Company is the first full-performance, full-size passenger fuel cell vehicle in the world. This development process has resulted in a vehicle with performance that matches some of today's vehicles powered by internal combustion engines. The powertrain in Ford's P2000 FCEV lightweight aluminum vehicle consists of an Ecostar electric motor/transaxle and a fuel cell system developed with XCELLSiS-The Fuel Cell Engine Company (formerly dbb Fuel Cell Engines, Inc.). Ballard's Mark 700 series fuel cell stack is a main component in the fuel cell system. To support this new FCEV, Ford has constructed the first North American hydrogen refueling station capable of dispensing gaseous and liquid hydrogen. On-going research and development is progressing to optimize fuel cell vehicle performance and refueling techniques.
Technical Paper

Modeling of HCCI Combustion and Emissions Using Detailed Chemistry

2001-03-05
2001-01-1029
To help guide the design of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, single and multi-zone models of the concept are developed by coupling the first law of thermodynamics with detailed chemistry of hydrocarbon fuel oxidation and NOx formation. These models are used in parametric studies to determine the effect of heat loss, crevice volume, temperature stratification, fuel-air equivalence ratio, engine speed, and boosting on HCCI engine operation. In the single-zone model, the cylinder is assumed to be adiabatic and its contents homogeneous. Start of combustion and bottom dead center temperatures required for ignition to occur at top dead center are reported for methane, n-heptane, isooctane, and a mixture of 87% isooctane and 13% n-heptane by volume (simulated gasoline) for a variety of operating conditions.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Dimethoxy Methane Additive on Diesel Vehicle Particulate Emissions

1998-10-19
982572
FTP emissions tests on a passenger vehicle equipped with a 1.8 L IDI turbo-charged diesel engine show that the mass emissions of particles decrease by (36±8)% when 16.6% dimethoxymethane (DMM) by volume is added to a diesel fuel. Particle size measurements reveal log-normal accumulation mode distributions with number weighted geometric mean diameters in the 80 - 100 nm range. The number density is comparable for both base fuel and the DMM/diesel blend; however, the distributions shift to smaller particle diameter for the blend. This shift to smaller size is consistent with the observed reduction in particulate mass. No change is observed in NOx emissions. Formaldehyde emissions increase by (50±25)%, while emissions of other hydrocarbons are unchanged to within the estimated experimental error.
Technical Paper

Fuel Permeation Performance of Polymeric Materials Analyzed by Gas Chromatography and Sorption Techniques

1998-05-04
981360
This paper describes the results of permeation and sorption tests conducted to assess the properties of several plastic materials as barriers to fuel. The materials examined include ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH), nylon, high density polyethylene, polyketone, poly-vinyledene fluoride (PVDF) as well as tetra-fluoro-ethylene, hexa-fluoro-propylene and vinyledene fluoride terpolymers (THV). The permeation from thin films of these materials exposed to methanol or CM15 was analyzed (speciated) by gas chromatography. These results are compared to those of parallel sorption experiments conducted on the same materials. The goal of this work is to determine the materials best suited for fuel barrier applications.
Technical Paper

Laboratory Testing of Cabin Air Filters for the Removal of Reduced-Sulfur Odors

1998-02-23
980873
The next generation of cabin air filters will include the ability to remove not only particulate matter, but odors as well. A key element in the development of odor removal filters is the design of laboratory tests to predict in-service performance. The studies described in this report used a combination of subjective and objective test methods to evaluate a series of odor-removal filters for their ability to remove environmentally significant reduced sulfur compounds. The work was performed in two parts. In the first part the detection, recognition, and annoyance thresholds for hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan were measured using a 37-member odor panel. The second part consisted of a group of tests in which the contaminant concentrations upstream and downstream of six types of filters were measured using an instrumental method.
Technical Paper

A View of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Aldehyde Emissions

1988-08-01
881200
The aldehyde emissions of 1.6L and 5.0L flexible fuel vehicles (FFV) have been measured, with and without a catalyst, on a range of fuels. The “zero mile” catalyzed emission levels of formaldehyde when operating on M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline) are in the 5-15 mg/mi range, but as mileage accumulates they tend to be in the 30-50 mg/mi range. The feedgas levels are high and appear to correlate with engine displacement. The formaldehyde and methanol emissions are higher when operating on M100, compared to M85, but the non-oxygenated hydrocarbon emissions are about the same for both fuels, which suggests that the use of M85 may actually provide more air quality benefit than M100. High mileage control of aldehydes to the level of gasoline vehicles does not appear possible with current technology.
Technical Paper

Parametric Simulation of Significant Design and Operating Alternatives Affecting the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Spark-Ignited Engines

1978-02-01
780943
A fundamental thermodynamic model of the complete spark-ignited, homogeneous charge engine cycle has been used in several parametric analyses to predict the effects of engine design and operating alternatives on fuel consumption and emissions of NOx and unburned hydrocarbons (HC). The simulation includes sub-models for wall heat transfer, NOx and HC emissions, and the engine breathing processes. This work demonstrates the power and utility of a comprehensive engine simulation by presenting several independent parametric studies that were carried out in response to genuine engine design and/or operating strategy questions. Included in this compilation are the effects of cycle heat loss, exhaust port heat loss, combustion duration, and charge dilution (EGR and/or lean air-fuel ratio). In addition, the influence of the design variables associated with bore-stroke ratio, intake and exhaust valve lift, and cam timing are considered.
Technical Paper

An Overhead Cam Wear and Valvetrain Dynamics Study

1989-09-01
892149
A 22 hour engine test was developed to evaluate the effects of fuels, lubricants, and valvetrain dynamics on the wear of OHC 2.3L engine camshafts and finger followers. Procedures include a break-in to improve test repeatability and a test sequence to allow single-shift operation. A surface analyzer capable of measuring cam lobe wear profiles to micro-inch accuracy provided a quantitative wear comparison. A pure mineral oil, as expected, resulted in higher camshaft wear than using a fully formulated SF lubricant. Cam and follower wear increased significantly when ethanol replaced gasoline as fuel. The combination of ethanol, mineral oil and heavy duty valve springs was selected to increase test severity for hardware discrimination. The average wear of the intake lobes was greater than the exhausts. Kinematic analysis and visual inspection of the valve train mechanism revealed differences in the relative motion and contact stress pattern.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Emission Indexes within a Turbine Combustor Operated on Diesel Fuel or Methanol

1973-02-01
730669
The emission index (grams of species per kilogram of fuel) field within a regenerative turbine combustor has been mapped using a water-cooled sampling probe. The probe employed a choked orifice to simultaneously determine the local temperature. Derived from measurements are: air-fuel ratio, combustion efficiency, average fuel velocity and fuel distribution factor. Methods of averaging the discrete data are developed. A comparison of the data obtained when the combustor was operated on each of two fuels revealed that the use of methanol leads to lower nitric oxide but higher carbon monoxide emission than does the use of diesel fuel.
Technical Paper

Method to Enhance Fuel Cell Powertrain System Robustness by Reducing Cathode Potential during Start-Up Condition

2017-03-28
2017-01-1186
This study investigates a system and a method to enhance fuel cell vehicle robustness during vehicle start/stop cycle by mitigating cathode half-cell potential spikes. Multiple dynamic hydrogen reference electrodes were installed in the fuel cell under test to observe changes of anode and cathode half-cell potentials during simulated system startup and shutdown conditions. Multiple reference electrodes were used to measure localized anode and cathode half-cell potentials in an active area. A 1.4-1.8 V half-cell potential spike at the cathode in the startup condition was observed due to a hydrogen/air boundary formed within the anode flow field. Various system solutions have been studied to contain the cathode half-cell potential spikes, such as purging with inert gas, or inserting a shunt resistor as a shorting component between the anode and the cathode. In this study, a method of connecting an electrical load prior to flowing hydrogen fuel to the cell was tested.
Technical Paper

Implications of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 for the US Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet

2009-11-02
2009-01-2770
The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 established a new Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) requiring increased biofuel use (through 2022) and greater fuel economy (through 2030) for the US light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet. Ethanol from corn and cellulose is expected to supply most of the biofuel and be used in blends with gasoline. A model was developed to assess the potential impact of these mandates on the US LDV fleet. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding future diesel prevalence, fuel economy, ethanol supply, ethanol blending options, availability of flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs), and extent of E85 use was assessed. With no E85 use, we estimate that the national-average ethanol blend level would need to rise from E5 in 2007 to approximately E10 in 2012 and E24 in 2022. Nearly all (97%) US gasoline LDVs were not designed to operate with blends greater than E10. FFVs are designed to use ethanol blends up to E85 but comprise only 3% of the fleet.
Technical Paper

CAI Combustion with Methanol and Ethanol in an Air-Assisted Direct Injection SI Engine

2008-06-23
2008-01-1673
CAI combustion has the potential to be the most clean combustion technology in internal combustion engines and is being intensively researched. Following the previous research on CAI combustion of gasoline fuel, systematic investigation is being carried out on the application of bio-fuels in CAI combustion. As part of an on-going research project, CAI combustion of methanol and ethanol was studied on a single-cylinder direct gasoline engine with an air-assisted injector. The CAI combustion was achieved by trapping part of burnt gas within the cylinder through using short-duration camshafts and early closure of the exhaust valves. During the experiment the engine speed was varied from 1200rpm to 2100rpm and the air/fuel ratio was altered from the stoichiometry to the misfire limit. Their combustion characteristics were obtained by analysing cylinder pressure trace.
Technical Paper

Field Testing of High Biodiesel Blends on Engine and Aftertreatement Durability, Performance, and Maintenance in an On-Highway Application

2013-04-08
2013-01-0511
This paper features an application study on the impact of different blend levels of commercially-supplied biodiesel on engine and aftertreatment systems' durability and reliability as well as the impact on owning and operating factors: service intervals and fuel economy. The study was conducted on a bus application with a 2007 on highway emissions equipped engine running biodiesel blends of B5, B20, and B99 for a total period approaching 4500 hours. Biodiesel of waste cooking grease feedstock was used for the majority of the testing, including B5 and B20 blends. Biodiesel of soybean feedstock was used for testing on B99 blend. No negative impacts on engine and aftertreatment performance and durability or indication of future potential issues were found when using B5 and B20. For B99 measurable impacts on engine and aftertreatment performance and owning and operating cost were observed.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation into Particulate Matter Oxidation in a Catalyzed Particulate Filter with Biodiesel Blends on an Engine during Active Regeneration

2013-04-08
2013-01-0521
Active regeneration experiments were carried out on a production 2007 Cummins 8.9L ISL engine and associated diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and catalyzed particulate filter (CPF) aftertreatment system. The effects of SME biodiesel blends were investigated to determine the particulate matter (PM) oxidation reaction rates for active regeneration. The experimental data from this study will also be used to calibrate the MTU-1D CPF model [1]. The experiments covered a range of CPF inlet temperatures using ULSD, B10, and B20 blends of biodiesel. The majority of the tests were performed at a CPF PM loading of 2.2 g/L with in-cylinder dosing, although 4.1 g/L and a post-turbo dosing injector were also investigated. The PM reaction rate was shown to increase with increasing percent biodiesel in the test fuel as well as increasing CPF temperature.
Technical Paper

Blend Ratio Optimization of Fuels Containing Gasoline Blendstock, Ethanol, and Higher Alcohols (C3-C6): Part II - Blend Properties and Target Value Sensitivity

2013-04-08
2013-01-1126
Higher carbon number alcohols offer an opportunity to meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) and improve the energy content, petroleum displacement, and/or knock resistance of gasoline-alcohol blends from traditional ethanol blends such as E10 while maintaining desired and regulated fuel properties. Part II of this paper builds upon the alcohol selection, fuel implementation scenarios, criteria target values, and property prediction methodologies detailed in Part I. For each scenario, optimization schemes include maximizing energy content, knock resistance, or petroleum displacement. Optimum blend composition is very sensitive to energy content, knock resistance, vapor pressure, and oxygen content criteria target values. Iso-propanol is favored in both scenarios' suitable blends because of its high RON value.
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