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Technical Paper

Modeling Turbulent Combustion Using a RANS Model, Detailed Chemistry, and Adaptive Mesh Refinement

2014-04-01
2014-01-1116
Combustion is governed by only two phenomena: chemical reactions and mixing (i.e., transport of energy, species, and momentum). A Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model is commonly employed to account for the enhanced mixing due to the presence of turbulence in fluid flow. A RANS turbulence model enhances mixing by introducing a turbulent viscosity. The addition of a turbulent viscosity not only enhances mixing but it also eliminates smaller scales in the CFD simulation. Even though the turbulent viscosity eliminates smaller scales, it is common for RANS engine combustion simulations to be under-resolved. The lack of sufficient mesh resolution to resolve the remaining scales in a RANS combustion simulation may result in a significant sub-grid term that needs to be modeled. In the context of combustion simulation, it is shown that frequently this sub-grid term is significantly more important than Turbulent Chemistry Interaction terms (TCI).
Technical Paper

Coupled Fluid-Solid Simulation for the Prediction of Gas-Exposed Surface Temperature Distribution in a SI Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0669
The current trend of downsizing used in gasoline engines, while reducing fuel consumption and CO2 emissions, imposes severe thermal loads inside the combustion chamber. These critical thermodynamic conditions lead to the possible auto-ignition (AI) of fresh gases hot-spots around Top-Dead-Center (TDC). At this very moment where the surface to volume ratio is high, wall heat transfer influences the temperature field inside the combustion chamber. The use of a realistic wall temperature distribution becomes important in the case of a downsized engine where fresh gases hot spots found near high temperature walls can initiate auto-ignition. This paper presents a comprehensive numerical methodology for an accurately prediction of thermodynamic conditions inside the combustion chamber based on Conjugate Heat Transfer (CHT).
Journal Article

Numerical Simulations of Supersonic Diesel Spray Injection and the Induced Shock Waves

2014-04-01
2014-01-1423
Shock waves have been recently observed in high-pressure diesel sprays. In this paper, three-dimensional numerical simulations of supersonic diesel spray injection have been performed to investigate the underlying dynamics of the induced shock waves and their interactions with the spray. A Volume-of-Fluid based method in the CFD software (CONVERGE) is used to model this multiphase phenomena. An adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) scheme is employed to capture the front of the spray and the shock waves with high fidelity. Simulation results are compared to the available experimental observations to validate the numerical procedure. Parametric studies with different injection and ambient conditions are conducted to examine the effect of these factors on the generation of shock waves and their dynamics.
Technical Paper

Cycle-to-Cycle Variations in Multi-Cycle Engine RANS Simulations

2016-04-05
2016-01-0593
Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling is expected to deliver an ensemble-averaged result for the majority of turbulent flows. This could lead to the conclusion that multi-cycle internal combustion engine (ICE) simulations performed using RANS must exhibit a converging numerical solution after a certain number of consecutive cycles. However, for some engine configurations unsteady RANS simulations are not guaranteed to deliver an ensemble-averaged result. In this paper it is shown that, when using RANS modeling to simulate multiple engine cycles, the cycle-to-cycle variations (CCV) generated from different initial conditions at each cycle are not damped out even after a large number of cycles. A single-cylinder GDI research engine is simulated using RANS modeling and the numerical results for 20 consecutive engine cycles are evaluated for two specific operating conditions.
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