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Technical Paper

Objective Characterization of Vehicle Brake Feel

1994-03-01
940331
Historically, vehicle brake feel has usually been evaluated in a subjective manner. If an objective measure was used, it was pedal force versus the deceleration rate of the vehicle. Stopping distance is almost always used to characterize vehicle braking performance by the automotive press. This represents limit braking performance, but ignores braking performance under normal driving conditions experienced by customers most of the time. Evaluation of pedal feel by the press is generally limited to subjective adjectives such as “mushy”, “positive”, and “responsive”. A method will be presented, which is being used by General Motors, to translate customer brake feel expectations into objective performance metrics. These metrics are correlated to actual subjective ratings and are used to set objective, measurable requirements for performance.
Technical Paper

Mercury in Automotive Systems - A White Paper

1996-02-01
960409
Mercury is a naturally occurring element and therefore neither created nor destroyed, but pushed and pulled throughout the biosphere. Mercury released in vapor form to the atmosphere can be transported and redeposited via atmospheric deposition. Recent international, federal and state regulatory initiatives have been directed toward effective use management and minimization of toxic substances in manufacturing and commerce. The concern is that these substances bioaccumulate in the food chain, posing a threat to human health and the environment. The most significant human health exposure to mercury is the dietary intake of fish and fish products, since mercury biomagnifies in aquatic species. The Michigan Environmental Science Board (MESB), a task force formed by the state of Michigan, has found a small margin of safety between background (i.e., natural) levels of mercury exposure and concentrations that can cause harm to humans. At the national level, the U.S.
Technical Paper

Novel Approach to Integration of Turbocompounding, Electrification and Supercharging Through Use of Planetary Gear System

2018-04-03
2018-01-0887
Technologies that provide potential for significant improvements in engine efficiency include, engine downsizing/downspeeding (enabled by advanced boosting systems such as an electrically driven compressor), waste heat recovery through turbocompounding or organic Rankine cycle and 48 V mild hybridization. FEV’s Integrated Turbocompounding/Waste Heat Recovery (WHR), Electrification and Supercharging (FEV-ITES) is a novel approach for integration of these technologies in a single unit. This approach provides a reduced cost, reduced space claim and an increase in engine efficiency, when compared to the independent integration of each of these technologies. This approach is enabled through the application of a planetary gear system. Specifically, a secondary compressor is connected to the ring gear, a turbocompounding turbine or organic Rankine cycle (ORC) expander is connected to the sun gear, and an electric motor/generator is connected to the carrier gear.
Technical Paper

Brake Response Time Measurement for a HIL Vehicle Dynamics Simulator

2010-04-12
2010-01-0079
Vehicle dynamics simulation with Hardware In the Loop (HIL) has been demonstrated to reduce development and validation time for dynamic control systems. For dynamic control systems such as Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) and Electronic Stability Control (ESC), an accurate vehicle dynamics performance simulation system requires the Electronic Brake Control Module (EBCM) coupled with the vehicles brake system hardware. This kind of HIL simulation-specific software tool can further increase efficiency by means of automation and optimization of the development and validation process. This paper presents a method for HIL vehicle dynamics simulator optimization through Brake Response Time (BRT) correlation. The paper discusses the differences between the physical vehicle and the HIL vehicle dynamics simulator. The differences between the physical and virtual systems are used as factors in the development of a Design Of Experiment (DOE) quantifying HIL simulator performance.
Technical Paper

Effects of Altitude and Road Gradients in Boosted Hydraulic Brake Systems

2016-04-05
2016-01-0463
Brake systems are strongly related with safety of vehicles. Therefore a reliable design of the brake system is critical as vehicles operate in a wide range of environmental conditions, fulfilling different security requirements. Particularly, countries with mountainous geography expose vehicles to aggressive variations in altitude and road grade. These variations affect the performance of the brake system. In order to study how these changes affect the brake system, two approaches were considered. The first approach was centered on the development of an analytical model for the longitudinal dynamics of the vehicle during braking maneuvers. This model was developed at system-level, considering the whole vehicle. This allowed the understanding of the relation between the braking force and the altitude and road grade, for different fixed deceleration requirement scenarios. The second approach was focused on the characterization of the vacuum servo operation.
Technical Paper

Finite Difference Heat Transfer Model of a Steel-clad Aluminum Brake Rotor

2005-10-09
2005-01-3943
This paper describes the heat transfer model of a composite aluminum brake rotor and compares the predicted temperatures to dynamometer measurements taken during a 15 fade stop trial. The model is based on meshed surface geometry which is simulated using RadTherm software. Methods for realistically modeling heat load distribution, surface rotation, convection cooling and radiation losses are also discussed. A comparison of the simulation results to the dynamometer data shows very close agreement throughout the fade stop trial. As such, the model is considered valid and will be used for further Steel Clad Aluminum (SCA) rotor development.
Technical Paper

Defining the General Motors 2-Mode Hybrid Transmission

2007-04-16
2007-01-0273
The new General Motors 2-Mode Hybrid transmission for full-size, full-utility SUVs integrates two electro-mechanical power-split operating modes with four fixed gear ratios and provides fuel savings from electric assist, regenerative braking and low-speed electric vehicle operation. A combination of two power-split modes reduces the amount of mechanical power that must be converted to electricity for continuously variable transmission operation. Four fixed gear ratios further improve power transmission capacity and efficiency for especially demanding maneuvers such as full acceleration, hill climbing, and towing. This paper explains the basics of electro-mechanical power-split transmissions, input-split and compound-split modes, and the addition of fixed gear ratios to these modes to create the 2-Mode Hybrid transmission for SUVs.
Technical Paper

The Calculation of Mass Fraction Burn of Ethanol-Gasoline Blended Fuels Using Single and Two-Zone Models

2008-04-14
2008-01-0320
One-dimensional single-zone and two-zone analyses have been exercised to calculate the mass fraction burned in an engine operating on ethanol/gasoline-blended fuels using the cylinder pressure and volume data. The analyses include heat transfer and crevice volume effects on the calculated mass fraction burned. A comparison between the two methods is performed starting from the derivation of conservation of energy and the method to solve the mass fraction burned rates through the results including detailed explanation of the observed differences and trends. The apparent heat release method is used as a point of reference in the comparison process. Both models are solved using the LU matrix factorization and first-order Euler integration.
Technical Paper

CFD Based Lumped Parameter Method to Predict the Thermal Performance of Brake Rotors in Vehicle

2003-03-03
2003-01-0601
The objective of the paper is to outline a CFD based lumped parameter method that compares the thermal performance of brake rotors, predicts the transient temperatures and brake lining wear in vehicle. A two-pronged approach was developed for this purpose. A rotor stand-alone model was used to predict rotor performance curves. Simultaneously heat transfer coefficients of the brake rotor were computed corresponding to the rotor performance curves and the appropriate heat transfer correlations were established. The second part of this approach involved developing a brake model in a vehicle and solving for the air flow through rotors in different vehicles at various speeds. These rotor flows were cross-referenced with the rotor performance curves, generated earlier for that rotor, to compute the heat transfer coefficients in the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Eliminating Caliper Piston Knock Back In High Performance Vehicles

2006-10-08
2006-01-3197
Powerful vehicles that are adequately designed to corner at high speeds can generate very high lateral forces at tire-road interface. These forces are counter balanced by chassis, suspension and brake components allowing the vehicle to confidently maneuver around a corner. Although these components may not damage under such high cornering loads, elastic deflections can significantly alter a vehicles performance. One such phenomenon is increased brake pedal travel, to engage brakes, after severe cornering maneuvers. Authors of this paper have worked together to solve exactly this problem on a very powerful luxury segment car.
Journal Article

Effect of Regenerative Braking on Foundation Brake Performance

2010-10-10
2010-01-1681
Regenerative braking is one of the key enablers of improved energy efficiency and extension of driving range in parallel and series hybrid, and electric-only vehicles. It is still used in conjunction with friction brakes, due to the enormous amount of energy dissipated in maximum effort stops (and the lack of a competitive alternate technology to accommodate this power level), and to provide braking when on-board energy storage/dissipation devices cannot store enough energy to support braking. Although vehicles equipped with regenerative braking are becoming more and more commonly available, there is little published research on what the dramatic reduction in friction brake usage means to the function of the friction brakes themselves. This paper discusses -with supporting data from analysis and physical tests - some of the considerations for friction brakes related to usage on vehicles with regenerative braking, including corrosion, off-brake wear, and friction levels.
Technical Paper

Model Based Design Accelerates the Development of Mechanical Locomotive Controls

2010-10-05
2010-01-1999
Smaller locomotives often use mechanical transmissions instead of diesel-electric drive systems typically used in larger locomotives. This paper discusses how Model Based Design was used to develop the complete drive train control system for a 24 ton sugar cane locomotive. A complete MATLAB Simulink machine model was built to fully test and verify the shift control logic, traction control, vehicle speed limiting, and braking control for this locomotive application before it was commissioned. The model included the engine, torque converter, planetary transmission, drive line, and steel on steel driving surface. Simulation was used to debug all control code and test and refine control strategies so that the initial field commissioning in remote Australia was executed very quickly with minimal engineering support required.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Racetrack / High Energy Driving on Brake Caliper Performance

2006-04-03
2006-01-0472
It is well understood that conditions encountered during racetrack driving are amongst the most severe to which vehicle braking systems can be subjected. High braking pressure is combined with enormous energy input and high temperatures for multiple braking events. Brake fade, degradation of brake pedal feel, and brake lining taper/overall wear are common results of racetrack usage. This paper focuses on how racetrack and high energy driving-type conditioning affects the performance of the brake caliper - in particular, its ability to maintain an even pressure distribution at all of its interfaces (pad to rotor, piston to pad backing plate, and housing to pad backing plate).
Journal Article

Brake System and Subsystem Design Considerations for Race Track and High Energy Usage Based on Fade Limits

2008-04-14
2008-01-0817
The friction material is arguably at the heart of any brake system, with its properties taking one of the most important roles in defining its performance characteristics. High performance applications, such as race track capable brake systems in high powered vehicles, exert considerable stress on the friction materials, in the form of very high heat flux loads, high clamp and brake torque loads, and high operating temperatures. It is important, for high performance applications, to select capable friction materials, and furthermore, it is important to understand fully what operating conditions the friction material will face in the considered application.
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