Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 6 of 6
Technical Paper

LES and RNG Turbulence Modeling in DI Diesel Engines

2003-03-03
2003-01-1069
The one-equation subgrid scale model for the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence model has been compared to the popular k-ε RNG turbulence model in very different sized direct injection diesel engines. The cylinder diameters of these engines range between 111 and 200 mm. This has been an initial attempt to study the effect of LES in diesel engines without any modification to the combustion model being used in its Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) form. Despite some deficiencies in the current LES model being used, it already gave much more structured flow field with approximately the same kind of accuracy in the cylinder pressure predictions than the k-ε RNG turbulence model.
Technical Paper

Diesel Spray Simulation and KH-RT Wave Model

2003-10-27
2003-01-3231
This study presents diesel spray breakup regimes and the wave model basic theory from literature. The RD wave model and the KH-RT wave model are explained. The implementation of the KH-RT wave model in a commercial CFD code is briefly presented. This study relies on experimental data from non-evaporating sprays that have earlier been measured at Helsinki University of Technology. The simulated fuel spray in a medium-speed diesel engine had a satisfactory match with the experimental data. The KH-RT wave model resulted in a much faster drop breakup than with the RD wave model. This resulted in a thin spray core with the KH-RT model. The fuel viscosity effect on drop sizes was well predicted by the KH-RT wave model.
Technical Paper

Heat Transfer Study of a High Power Density Diesel Engine

2004-10-25
2004-01-2962
The development of diesel engines is constantly leading to greater increases in the power density. The heat load into the combustion chamber walls increases with the increased power density. Estimating correct local heat fluxes inside the combustion chamber is one of the most challenging tasks in engine simulation. In this study, the heat load of the piston was estimated with the help of the modern simulation tools CFD and FEM. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal stress of a research engine designed for an exceptionally high maximum and mean pressure. The local heat transfer coefficient and gas temperature were simulated with a CFD code with the standard and modified wall functions and used as boundary values for the FEM analysis. As a reference case, a model of a production engine with measured piston surface temperatures was used to validate the combined CFD and FEM analysis.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Charge, Initial Flow Field and Fuel Injection Boundary Condition in the Multidimensional Modeling of Combustion in Compression Ignition Engines

2004-10-25
2004-01-2963
Cylinder charge, cylinder flow field and fuel injection play the dominant roles in controlling combustion in compression ignition engines. Respective computational cylinder charge, initial flow field and fuel injection boundary affect combustion simulation and the quality of emission prediction. In this study the means of generating the initial values and boundary data are presented and the effect of different methods is discussed. This study deals with three different compression ignition engines with cylinder diameters of 111, 200 and 460 mm. The initial cylinder charge has been carefully analyzed through gas exchange pressure recordings and corresponding 1-dimensional simulation. The swirl generated by intake ports in a high-speed engine is simulated and measured. The combustion simulation using a whole cylinder model was compared with a sector model simulation result.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Non-Evaporating Diesel Sprays and Verification with Experimental Data

2002-03-04
2002-01-0946
Non-evaporating diesel sprays have been simulated utilizing the ETAB and the WAVE atomization and breakup models and have been compared with experimental data. The experimental penetrations and widths were determined from back-lit spray images and the droplet sizes have been measured by means of a Malvern particle sizer. The model evaluation criteria include the spray penetration, the spray width and the local droplet size. The comparisons have been performed for variations of the injection pressure, the gas density and the fuel viscosity. The fuel nozzle exit velocities used in the simulations have been computed with a special code that considers the effect of in-nozzle cavitation. The simulations showed good overall agreement with experimental data. However, the capabilities of the models to predict the droplet size for different fuels could be improved.
Technical Paper

Novel Two-Stroke Engine Concept, Feasibility Study

2003-10-27
2003-01-3211
A novel two-stroke engine concept is introduced. The cylinder scavenging takes place during the upward motion of the piston. The gas exchange valves are similar to typical four-stroke valves, but the intake valves are smaller and lighter. The scavenging air pressure is remarkably higher than in present-day engines. The high scavenging air pressure is produced by an external compressor. The two-stroke operation is achieved without the drawbacks of port scavenged engines. Moreover, the combustion circumstances, charge pressure and temperature and internal exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR) can be controlled by using valve timings. There is good potential for a substantial reduction in NOx emissions through the use of adjustable compression pressure and temperature and by using the adjustable amount of exhaust gas re-circulation.
X