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Technical Paper

On the Suitability of a New High-Power Lithium Ion Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications

2003-06-23
2003-01-2289
Due to the low cost of the battery cells and excellent performance at ambient temperature, Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is a promising technology for propulsion applications. However, the performance of Li-ion batteries erodes drastically at extreme temperatures (above 65 °C or below 0 °C). Therefore, in order to maintain battery life and performance, it is crucial to keep the batteries within the temperature range where their operating characteristics are optimal. The need for expensive and complex thermal management systems has in fact kept the Li-ion technology from becoming the first choice for Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) applications. In this paper, we propose a Phase Change Material (PCM) for the temperature control. Due to its high heat capacity, PCM absorbs the heat dissipated by the battery. As long as the heat emitted by the battery does not melt the PCM completely, the system is stable.
Technical Paper

Effects of Electrical Loads on 42V Automotive Power Systems

2003-06-23
2003-01-2257
Demands for higher fuel economy, performance, reliability, convenience, as well as reduced emissions push the automotive industry to seek electrification of ancillaries and engine augmentations. In cars of the future, throttle actuation, steering, anti-lock braking, rear-wheel steering, active suspension and ride-height adjustment, air-conditioning, and electrically heated catalyst will all benefit from the electrical power system. Therefore, a higher system voltage, such as the proposed 42V, is necessary to handle these new introduced loads. In this paper, an overview of the systems that will benefit from the 42V bus is presented. Effects of the new introduced electrical loads on the electrical power systems of conventional cars are described. Dynamic characteristics of each load for a typical drive cycle are defined. In addition, system level issues and vehicle performances such as fuel economy are addressed.
Technical Paper

42V Integrated Starter/Alternator Systems

2003-06-23
2003-01-2258
The increasing power demand in vehicles has resulted in a need for a higher onboard generation capacity. With the increasing generation requirement, the torque levels of the generator are found to closely converge with that of the starter motor. Hence, integrating the two machines and using a single machine for the two purposes would be technically viable and economically advantageous. This results in a more compact design solution as well. The Integrated Starter/Alternator (ISA) will be integrated directly to the crankshaft of the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) and deliver 5 kW average and 12-15 kW peak power at 42V.
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