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Technical Paper

An Experimental and Computational Investigation of Water Condensation inside the Tubes of an Automotive Compact Charge Air Cooler

2016-04-05
2016-01-0224
To address the need of increasing fuel economy requirements, automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are increasing the number of turbocharged engines in their powertrain line-ups. The turbine-driven technology uses a forced induction device, which increases engine performance by increasing the density of the air charge being drawn into the cylinder. Denser air allows more fuel to be introduced into the combustion chamber, thus increasing engine performance. During the inlet air compression process, the air is heated to temperatures that can result in pre-ignition resulting and reduced engine functionality. The introduction of the charge air cooler (CAC) is therefore, necessary to extract heat created during the compression process. The present research describes the physics and develops the optimized simulation method that defines the process and gives insight into the development of CACs.
Technical Paper

The Vehicle Engine Cooling System Simulation Part 1 - Model Development

1999-03-01
1999-01-0240
The Vehicle Engine Cooling System Simulation (VECSS) computer code has been developed at the Michigan Technological University to simulate the thermal response of the cooling system of an on-highway heavy duty diesel powered truck under steady and transient operation. This code includes an engine cycle analysis program along with various components for the four main fluid circuits for cooling air, cooling water, cooling oil, and intake air, all evaluated simultaneously. The code predicts the operation of the response of the cooling circuit, oil circuit, and the engine compartment air flow when the VECSS is operated using driving cycle data of vehicle speed, engine speed, and fuel flow rate for a given ambient temperature, pressure and relative humidity.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Human Response From Vehicle Performance Characteristics Using Artificial Neural Networks

2002-05-07
2002-01-1570
This study investigates a methodology in which the general public's subjective interpretation of vehicle handling and performance can be predicted. Several vehicle handling measurements were acquired, and associated metrics calculated, in a controlled setting. Human evaluators were then asked to drive and evaluate each vehicle in a winter driving school setting. Using the acquired data, multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) techniques were used to create and refine mathematical models of human subjective responses. It is shown that artificial neural networks, which have been trained with the sets of objective and subjective data, are both more accurate and more robust than multiple linear regression models created from the same data.
Technical Paper

Quantifying How the Environment Effects SAE-J192 Pass-by Noise Testing of Snowmobiles

2005-05-16
2005-01-2414
A study was performed to understand how the environment affects the results of J-192 pass-by noise testing of snowmobiles. This study involved measuring the sound pressure at 7 different microphone positions due to both speaker excitation and various snowmobiles passing through the microphone array. Simultaneous to the sound measurements, weather conditions were recorded including wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, snow depth, and in some cases ground hardness. All measured data was then used to determine which environmental factors influenced the measured sound pressures the most. Finally, a sound power approach was also used to measure the snowmobile pass-by noise to determine whether this method was more repeatable than the single microphone approach which showed variations of over 7 dBA over the course of testing.
Journal Article

Impact of Ice Formation in Diesel Fuel on Tier 4 Off-Road Engine Performance with High Efficiency Fuel Filtration

2015-09-29
2015-01-2817
The winter of 2013-2014 provided an opportunity to operate off-road vehicles in cold weather for extended time as part of a vehicle/tier 4 diesel engine validation program. An unexpected area of study was the performance of high efficiency, on engine, fuel filters during continuous vehicle operation in cold weather. During the program we observed unexpected premature fuel filter plugging as indicated by an increase in pressure drop across the filter while in service. Field and laboratory testing was completed at John Deere and Donaldson to understand the cause of filter plugging. Although conditions were found where winter fuel additives could cause plugging of high efficiency filters, premature filter plugging occurred even when testing with #1 diesel fuel. This fuel contained no additives and was used at temperatures well above its cloud point.
Journal Article

Engine Test for DOC Quenching in DOC-DPF System for Non-Road Applications

2010-04-12
2010-01-0815
The use of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) in conjunction with a diesel particulate filter (DPF) is now a well-established aftertreatment system design for on-road heavy duty diesel. For non-road applications, the DOC must respond to the need for performance under more diverse and less favorable conditions, such as operation at low loads in cold weather. To choose a DOC technology for such applications, one must have practical and meaningful tests that address the specific catalytic functions of interest such as hydrocarbon oxidation to produce heat for regenerating DPF. This paper describes the development of an engine test protocol that focuses on resistance to the phenomenon known as quenching, the cessation of hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation that occurs when the exhaust temperature decreases below the light-off temperature of the catalyst. During development, the sensitivity and repeatability of the test were carefully scrutinized.
Technical Paper

Snow surface model for tire performance simulation

2000-06-12
2000-05-0252
New tire model is under development in European Commission research project called VERT (Vehicle Road Tire Interaction, BRPR-CT97-0461). The objective of the project is to create a physical model for tire/surface contact simulation. One of the subtasks has been to develop a method for snow surface characterization. The aim is simulate winter tire on snow surface with FEM software. This kind of simulation has been earlier done with snow model parameters from laboratory experiments. A snow shear box device has been developed in Helsinki University of Technology to measure mechanical properties of snow in field conditions. Both shear and compression properties can be measured with the device. With the device, a large number of snow measurements have been done at the same time with VERT winter tire testing in Nokian Tyres'' test track in Ivalo Finland. Measurement data have been postprocessed afterwards and parameters for material models have been evaluated.
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