Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
Technical Paper

Analysis of Combustion Knock Metrics in Spark-Ignition Engines

2006-04-03
2006-01-0400
Combustion knock detection and control in internal combustion engines continues to be an important feature in engine management systems. In spark-ignition engine applications, the frequency of occurrence of combustion knock and its intensity are controlled through a closed-looped feedback system to maintain knock at levels that do not cause engine damage or objectionable audible noise. Many methods for determination of the feedback signal for combustion knock in spark-ignition internal combustion engines have been employed with the most common technique being measurement of engine vibration using an accelerometer. With this technique single or multiple piezoelectric accelerometers are mounted on the engine and vibrations resulting from combustion knock and other sources are converted to electrical signals. These signals are input to the engine control unit and are processed to determine the signal strength during a period of crank-angle when combustion knock is expected.
Technical Paper

Accelerometer Based Sensing of Combustion in a High Speed HPCR Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-0972
The capability to detect combustion in a diesel engine has the potential of being an important control feature to meet increasingly stringent emission regulations and for the development of alternative combustion strategies such as HCCI and PCCI. In this work, block mounted accelerometers are investigated as potential feedback sensors for detecting combustion characteristics in a high-speed, high pressure common rail (HPCR), 1.9L diesel engine. Accelerometers are positioned in multiple placements and orientations on the engine, and engine testing is conducted under motored, single and pilot-main injection conditions. Engine tests are then conducted at varying injection timings to observe the resulting time and frequency domain changes of both the pressure and acceleration signals.
Technical Paper

Impingement Identification in a High Speed Diesel Engine Using Piston Surface Temperature Measurements

2005-04-11
2005-01-1909
The objective of this investigation was to identify the impingement event on a diesel piston surface. Eight fast-response, surface thermocouples were installed in one of the pistons of a 2.0 liter, four-cylinder, turbo-charged diesel engine (97 kW @ 3800 rpm). Piston temperatures were transmitted from the engine using wireless microwave telemetry. An impingement signal was identified on the piston bowl lip. A simple parameter for characterizing the impingement event is proposed. The results show an impingement signature at one of the bowl lip thermocouples, under specific operating conditions.
Journal Article

Signal Processing Parameters for Estimation of the Diesel Engine Combustion Signature

2011-05-17
2011-01-1649
Research into the estimation of diesel engine combustion metrics via non-intrusive means, typically referred to as “remote combustion sensing” has become an increasingly active area of combustion research. Success in accurately estimating combustion metrics with low-cost non-intrusive transducers has been proven and documented by multiple sources on small scale diesel engines (2-4 cylinders, maximum outputs of 67 Kw, 210 N-m). This paper investigates the application of remote combustion sensing technology to a larger displacement inline 6-cylinder diesel with substantially higher power output (280 kW, 1645 N-m) than previously explored. An in-depth frequency analysis has been performed with the goal of optimizing the estimated combustion signature which has been computed based upon the direct relationship between the combustion event measured via a pressure transducer, and block vibration measured via accelerometers.
Technical Paper

A Variable Displacement Engine with Independently Controllable Stroke Length and Compression Ratio

2006-04-03
2006-01-0741
A variable displacement engine with the capability to vary stroke length and compression ratio independent of one another has been designed, prototyped, and successfully operated. Reasons for investigation of such an engine are the potential for improvement in fuel economy and/or performance. Literature has shown that engines with variable compression ratio can significantly decrease specific fuel consumption. Engines with variability in stroke length can maintain peak efficiency running conditions by adjusting power output through displacement change verses through the efficiency detriment of throttling. The project began with the synthesis of a planar 2-dimensional rigid body mechanism. Various synthesis techniques were employed and design took place with a collection of computer software. MATLAB code performed much of the synthesis, kinematic, and dynamic analysis.
X