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Technical Paper

Development of an Empirically Based Volumetric Flow Rate Transfer Function for Ports Using Airflow Measurements

2006-04-03
2006-01-0997
Deficiencies in understanding port flow have created an elongated design process involving computer automated engineering tools and empirical results. Analytical flow models could solve the problem however the error in existing algorithms often exceed ten percent. These discrepancies come from the fact that the flow direction relative to the outflow area has not been properly treated. The current paper describes how Design For Six Sigma was used to develop a new transfer function based upon a finite set of empirical results and the port geometry. The error between the volumetric flow rate transfer function and the observed result is less than ten percent. This accuracy is high enough to bypass the computer automated engineering process and its associated week-long delays.
Technical Paper

Measurement and Analysis of the Residual Gas Fraction in an SI Engine with Variable Cam Timing

2004-03-08
2004-01-1356
A spontaneous Raman scattering diagnostic was used to measure the residual fraction in a single-cylinder, 4-valve optically accessible engine. The engine was operated at 1500 rpm on pre-vaporized iso-octane at several intake manifold pressures (50-90 kPa). Cam phasing was varied to determine the effect of intake valve timing and valve overlap on the residual mass fraction of the engine. A simple model based on the ideal Otto cycle and 1D gas flow through the exhaust valves was proposed to analyze the results of the Raman experiment. The model showed good agreement (R2=0.91) with the experimental results and demonstrated its potential for use as a method to estimate the residual fraction in an engine from available dynamometer data. The experimental results showed that the residual fraction was reduced at higher manifold pressures due to less backflow through the exhaust valves and varied with intake cam phasing.
Technical Paper

Stratified-Charge Fuel Preparation Influence on the Misfire Rate of a DISI Engine

2004-03-08
2004-01-0549
The influence of mixture preparation on misfires at idle in a Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine was investigated. A wall-guided DISI engine was run at idle conditions in a stratified charge mode (750 rpm / 90 kPa MAP). Images of the mixture composition at the spark plug were taken at spark timing using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) for several different End-of-Injection (EOI) timings and spark timings. Cylinder pressure data were acquired simultaneously with the images to identify misfire cycles. The misfire rate was found to increase as the EOI timing was advanced from the optimal timing, defined by maximum stability and lowest ISFC. Images show that the misfire rate at a particular operating condition can be correlated to the fuel distribution and the location of the stratified charge in the engine. Cycles that showed a lower amount of stratification (overmixing) and/or high gradients in fuel concentration near the spark plug were the least stable.
Journal Article

Influence of Injector Location on Part-Load Performance Characteristics of Natural Gas Direct-Injection in a Spark Ignition Engine

2016-10-17
2016-01-2364
Interest in natural gas as an alternative fuel source to petroleum fuels for light-duty vehicle applications has increased due to its domestic availability and stable price compared to gasoline. With its higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, natural gas has the potential to reduce engine out carbon dioxide emissions, which has shown to be a strong greenhouse gas contributor. For part-load conditions, the lower flame speeds of natural gas can lead to an increased duration in the inflammation process with traditional port-injection. Direct-injection of natural gas can increase in-cylinder turbulence and has the potential to reduce problems typically associated with port-injection of natural gas, such as lower flame speeds and poor dilution tolerance. A study was designed and executed to investigate the effects of direct-injection of natural gas at part-load conditions.
Journal Article

Performance, Efficiency and Emissions Assessment of Natural Gas Direct Injection compared to Gasoline and Natural Gas Port-Fuel Injection in an Automotive Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0806
Interest in natural gas as a fuel for light-duty transportation has increased due to its domestic availability and lower cost relative to gasoline. Natural gas, comprised mainly of methane, has a higher knock resistance than gasoline making it advantageous for high load operation. However, the lower flame speeds of natural gas can cause ignitability issues at part-load operation leading to an increase in the initial flame development process. While port-fuel injection of natural gas can lead to a loss in power density due to the displacement of intake air, injecting natural gas directly into the cylinder can reduce such losses. A study was designed and performed to evaluate the potential of natural gas for use as a light-duty fuel. Steady-state baseline tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine equipped for port-fuel injection of gasoline and natural gas, as well as centrally mounted direct injection of natural gas.
Journal Article

Evaluation of Knock Behavior for Natural Gas - Gasoline Blends in a Light Duty Spark Ignited Engine

2016-10-17
2016-01-2293
The compression ratio is a strong lever to increase the efficiency of an internal combustion engine. However, among others, it is limited by the knock resistance of the fuel used. Natural gas shows a higher knock resistance compared to gasoline, which makes it very attractive for use in internal combustion engines. The current paper describes the knock behavior of two gasoline fuels, and specific incylinder blend ratios with one of the gasoline fuels and natural gas. The engine used for these investigations is a single cylinder research engine for light duty application which is equipped with two separate fuel systems. Both fuels can be used simultaneously which allows for gasoline to be injected into the intake port and natural gas to be injected directly into the cylinder to overcome the power density loss usually connected with port fuel injection of natural gas.
Journal Article

Applications of CFD Modeling in GDI Engine Piston Optimization

2009-06-15
2009-01-1936
This paper describes a CFD modeling based approach to address design challenges in GDI (gasoline direct injection) engine combustion system development. A Ford in-house developed CFD code MESIM (Multi-dimensional Engine Simulation) was applied to the study. Gasoline fuel is multi-component in nature and behaves very differently from the single component fuel representation under various operating conditions. A multi-component fuel model has been developed and is incorporated in MESIM code. To apply the model in engine simulations, a multi-component fuel recipe that represents the vaporization characteristics of gasoline is also developed using a numerical model that simulates the ASTM D86 fuel distillation experimental procedure. The effect of the multi-component model on the fuel air mixture preparations under different engine conditions is investigated. The modeling approach is applied to guide the GDI engine piston designs.
Journal Article

Modeling the Cold Start of the Ford 3.5L V6 EcoBoost Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-1493
Optimization of the engine cold start is critical for gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines to meet increasingly stringent emission regulations, since the emissions during the first 20 seconds of the cold start constitute more than 80% of the hydrocarbon (HC) emissions for the entire EPA FTP75 drive cycle. However, Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine cold start optimization is very challenging due to the rapidly changing engine speed, cold thermal environment and low cranking fuel pressure. One approach to reduce HC emissions for DISI engines is to adopt retarded spark so that engines generate high heat fluxes for faster catalyst light-off during the cold idle. This approach typically degrades the engine combustion stability and presents additional challenges to the engine cold start. This paper describes a CFD modeling based approach to address these challenges for the Ford 3.5L V6 EcoBoost engine cold start.
Journal Article

Development and Optimization of the Ford 3.5L V6 EcoBoost Combustion System

2009-04-20
2009-01-1494
Recently, Ford Motor Company announced the introduction of EcoBoost engines in its Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles as an affordable fuel-saving option to millions of its customers. The EcoBoost engine is planned to start production in June of 2009 in the Lincoln MKS. The EcoBoost engine integrates direct fuel injection with turbocharging to significantly improve fuel economy via engine downsizing. An application of this technology bundle into a 3.5L V6 engine delivers up to 12% better drive cycle fuel economy and 15% lower emissions with comparable torque and power as a 5.4L V8 PFI engine. Combustion system performance is key to the success of the EcoBoost engine. A systematic methodology has been employed to develop the EcoBoost engine combustion system.
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