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Technical Paper

The Ford Motor Company Spin-Torsional NVH Test Facility-2

2003-05-05
2003-01-1684
The Ford Spin Torsional NVH TEST Facility developed and completed in 1999 as a state-of-the-art powertrain NVH development facility(1). Since then, various designed capabilities have been verified with test vehicles for multiple applications to facilitate powertrain NVH development. This paper describes fundamental capabilities of the test facility, including input module to simulate engine torque signatures of arbitrary engines (“virtual engine” capability) and absorbing dynamometer systems, functioning as a precision 4WD/AWD chassis dynamometer. The correlation between road test/chassis dynamometer test and Spin-Torsional test is then illustrated, verifying high correlation of vehicle/sub-system responses between conventional vehicle testing and Spin-Torsional test results.
Technical Paper

The Ford Motor Company Transmission NVH Test Cell

2003-05-05
2003-01-1681
Effectively managing transmission noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) has become increasingly important for maximizing customer satisfaction and fostering the perception of quality in contemporary cars and trucks. As overall vehicle and engine masking levels have dramatically decreased in recent times, low level tonal noises generated by transmission internals have gained significance and therefore have a greater effect on the NVH performance of vehicles. Recognizing the importance of this trend, Ford Motor Company recently designed and built a state-of-the-art research and development facility to be used for reducing noise and vibration generated by automatic and manual vehicle transmissions. The significant design features and validation results of this facility are described in this paper.
Technical Paper

Control of Powertrain Noise Using a Frequency Domain Filtered-x LMS Algorithm

2009-05-19
2009-01-2145
An enhanced, frequency domain filtered-x least mean square (LMS) algorithm is proposed as the basis for an active control system for treating powertrain noise. There are primarily three advantages of this approach: (i) saving of computing time especially for long controller’s filter length; (ii) more accurate estimation of the gradient due to the sample averaging of the whole data block; and (iii) capacity for rapid convergence when the adaptation parameter is correctly adjusted for each frequency bin. Unlike traditional active noise control techniques for suppressing response, the proposed frequency domain FXLMS algorithm is targeted at tuning vehicle interior response in order to achieve a desirable sound quality. The proposed control algorithm is studied numerically by applying the analysis to treat vehicle interior noise represented by either measured or predicted cavity acoustic transfer functions.
Technical Paper

Transient Clunk Response of a Driveline System: Laboratory Experiment and Analytical Studies

2007-05-15
2007-01-2233
A laboratory experiment is designed to examine the clunk phenomenon. A static torque is applied to a driveline system via the mass of an overhanging torsion bar and electromagnet. Then an applied load may be varied via attached mass and released to simulate the step down (tip-out) response of the system. Shaft torques and torsional and translational accelerations are recorded at pre-defined locations. The static torque closes up the driveline clearances in the pinion/ring (crown wheel) mesh. With release of the applied load the driveline undergoes transient vibration. Further, the ratio of preload to static load is adjusted to lead to either no-impact or impact events. Test A provides a ‘linear’ result where the contact stiffness does not pass into clearance. This test is used for confirming transient response and studying friction and damping. Test B is for mass release with sufficient applied torque to pass into clearance, allowing the study of the clunk.
Technical Paper

Predicting Variation in the NVH Characteristics of an Automatic Transmission using a Detailed Parametric Modelling Approach

2007-05-15
2007-01-2234
Generally within engineering design, the current emphasis is on biasing the development process towards increased virtual prototyping and reduced “real” prototyping. Therefore there is a requirement for more CAE based automated optimisation, Design of Experiments and Design for Six Sigma. The main requirements for these processes are that the model being analysed is parametric and that the solution time is short. Prediction of gear whine behaviour in automatic transmissions is a particularly complex problem where the conventional FEA approach precludes the rapid assessment of “what if?” scenarios due to the slow model building and solution times. This paper will present an alternative approach, which is a fully parametric functionality-based model, including the effects of and interactions between all components in the transmission. In particular the time-varying load sharing and misalignment in the planetary gears will be analysed in detail.
Technical Paper

Analytical Study for Transient Driveline Clunk Response Subject to Step Torque Input by a Mass Release System

2007-05-15
2007-01-2244
A series of laboratory driveline clunk experiment was conducted by using an overhung torsion bar and electromagnet to create a sudden change in torque loading in the driveline system. The change of the torque loading was designed to force the driveline to go through the gear lashes inside the rear axle and result in clunk phenomenon. The study was investigated by using a simulation code developed in Matlab and ADAMS CAE. The analytical study enabled parametric investigation of component contribution to various time responses exhibited in the experiment. The results also revealed intricate interaction between the friction properties and the driveline torsional dynamics which were observed in the experiment.
Technical Paper

High Frequency Gear Whine Control by Driveshaft Design Optimization

2003-05-05
2003-01-1478
Generation mechanism of transmission gear whine varies significantly by gear position, frequency and path/amplifier of the total system. Although controlling the source, namely transmission error/dynamic meshing force of the gears is desirable; it is not always feasible as well as most effective. This paper describes the root cause analyses of high frequency gear whine (overdrive position) of commercial vehicle, which combined in-depth experimental and CAE analyses. The generation mechanism of the gear whine is clarified efficiently utilizing Ford Spin-Torsional AWD NVH Test Facility, state-of-the-art Powertrain NVH development test cell, combining vehicle and sub-system NVH measurement. The analyses results showed the O/D gear whine is driveshaft airborne, due to alignment of driveshaft higher bending resonance to air-borne mode (“breathing mode”).
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