Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

Quantification of Friction Component Engagement Controllability

2001-03-05
2001-01-1156
Conventional automatic transmissions (AT) use wet friction components, such as plate clutches and band brakes to engage gears or change speed ratios during vehicle operation. The quality of engagements and ratio changes depends greatly on the frictional characteristics of the friction components, which are typically evaluated with industry standard SAE #2 test machines. These inertia absorption-type dynamometer test stands energize a friction component with prescribed level of apply force and load of inertia flywheels rotating at a specified speed until the friction elements are brought to a stop. During the slip, apply force, engagement torque, and rotating speed are digitally recorded for visual evaluation of dynamic engagement behavior. The shape of the dynamic torque curve during the engagement is known to affect AT shift quality. When many curves are generated, it becomes intractable to quantify torque curve shape differences.
Technical Paper

Effect of Test Section Configuration on Aerodynamic Drag Measurements

2001-03-05
2001-01-0631
Aerodynamic measurements in automotive wind tunnels are degraded by test section interference effects, which increase with increasing vehicle blockage ratio. The current popularity of large vehicles (i.e. trucks and sport utility vehicles) makes this a significant issue. This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation carried out in support of the Ford/Sverdrup Driveability Test Facility (DTF), which includes an aero-acoustic wind tunnel (Wind Tunnel No. 8). The objective was to quantify the aerodynamic interference associated with two candidate test section configurations for Wind Tunnel No. 8-semi-open jet and slotted wall. The experiments were carried out at 1/11-scale in Sverdrup laboratories. Four automobile shapes (MIRA models) and six Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV) shapes representing blockages from 7% to 25% were used to evaluate changes in measured aerodynamic coefficients for the two test section configurations.
Technical Paper

Local-Global Finite-Element Analysis for Cam Cover Noise Reduction

2003-05-05
2003-01-1725
Valve covers are a primary source of radiated engine noise. In this paper, we discuss an analytical approach that captures the complicated nonlinear response of the cam cover gaskets and grommets without the need for a prohibitively large finite-element model of the cam cover system. We utilize a detailed local analysis of the gasket and grommet components and abstract their isolation characteristics for later use in a global NVH (Noise-Vibration-Harshness) system analysis.
Technical Paper

PIV Characterization of a 4-valve Engine with a Camshaft Profile Switching (CPS) system

2003-05-19
2003-01-1803
Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed on a single cylinder optically accesible version of a 3.0L 4-valve engine using a Camshaft Profile Switching (CPS) system. The flow field was investigated at two engine speeds (750 and 1500 rpm), two manifold pressures (75 and 90 kPa) and two intake cam centerlines (maximum lift at 95° and 115° aTDCi respectively). Images were taken in the swirl plane at 10 mm and 40 mm below the deck with the piston at 300° aTDC of intake (60° bTDC compression) and BDC respectively. In the tumble plane, images were taken in a plane bisecting the intake valves with the piston at BDC and 300° aTDC. The results showed that the swirl ratio was slightly lower for this system compared with a SCV system (swirl control valve in the intake port) under the same operating conditions. The swirl and tumble ratios generated were not constant over the range of engine speeds and manifold pressures (MAP) but instead increased with engine speed and MAP.
Technical Paper

Effective In-Vehicle Acquisition

1998-02-23
981076
This paper will describe the development of an in-vehicle data acquisition and analysis system. The problem facing the Vehicle Dynamics Test Section of Ford Motor Company was to replace an antiquated data recorder with a versatile in-vehicle data acquisition system capable of supporting vehicle dynamics testing and development. The following criteria for a system was developed: Quick and easy quick software and hardware setup Off-the-shelf hardware wherever possible User-friendly software Flexible Open-ended and modular design Rugged Cost effective Utilizing the above criteria a number of commercially available systems were evaluated and found to be lacking. Therefore it was decided that a system suitable for vehicle dynamics testing would have to be developed.
Technical Paper

The Advantages of Using Standard Vehicle Dynamics Procedures and Analysis Programs

1998-02-23
981077
Globalization in the automotive industry has resulted in a tremendous competitive advantage to those companies who can internally communicate ideas and information effectively and in a timely manner. This paper discusses one such effort related to objectively testing vehicles for steering and handling characteristics by implementing standard test procedures, data acquisition hardware and analysis methods. Ford Motor Company's Vehicle Dynamics Test Section has refined a number of test procedures to the point that, with proper training, all design and development engineers can quickly acquire, analyze and share test results. Four of these procedures and output are discussed in detail.
Technical Paper

Pump/Motor Displacement Control Using High-Speed On/Off Valves

1998-09-14
981968
A four valve controller and electronic control circuits were developed to control the displacement of hydrostatic pump/motors (P/M's) utilized in an automobile with a hydrostatic transmission and hydropneumatic accumulator energy storage. Performance of the control system was evaluated. The controller uses four high-speed, two-way, single-stage poppet valves, functioning in the same manner as a 4-way, 3-position spool valve. Two such systems were used to control the displacement of two P/Ms, each system driving a front wheel of the vehicle. The valves were controlled electronically by a distributed-control dead-band circuit and valve driver boards. Testing showed that the control system's time response satisified driving demand needs, but that the control system's error was slightly larger than desired. This may lead to complications in some of the vehicle's operating modes.
Technical Paper

Surface and Engine Oil Effects on Journal Bearing Lubrication

1998-05-04
981408
Lubrication conditions in journal bearings lubricated with low friction engine oils have been investigated using two complementary experimental techniques. Load supporting capacity under conditions ranging from fully flooded to mixed lubrication was measured for several candidate oils using a bench test that simulates the dynamic motion of a journal bearing at fixed, measurable eccentricities. The performance of these oils was also assessed using a bearing test rig in which journal friction is measured under typical engine conditions of speed, load and temperature. Significant mixed lubrication conditions were shown to exist at low speeds in heavily loaded journal bearings. Under such conditions, oil with friction reducing additives exhibit higher load supporting capacity, distinct separation of moving parts, and reduced friction relative to oils without such additives.
Technical Paper

Reverse Engineering of Geometrically Complex Automotive Structures Using X-Ray Computed Tomography and Digital Image Based Finite Element Methods

1998-02-01
981193
Stress analyses of complex automotive components can be nearly impossible to achieve due to extreme difficulties in generating a realistic finite element model. A digital image based finite element approach was used to generate a 3-D finite element model from computed tomography (CT) scans of two automotive transmission cases. For the first case, original CT slices of 1024x1024x208 provided by ARACOR Inc. (Sunnyvale, CA) were used to generate a 3-D finite element model containing nearly 400,000 8-node brick elements. For the second case, 770x870x759 CT slices were used to generate a 3-D finite element model containing approximately 650,000 3-D elements. The mesh data generation from CT data for both cases took 6 minutes each on an engineering workstation. The resulting finite element meshes were analyzed using a specially designed finite element equation solver.
Technical Paper

Engineering Moveable Glass Window Seals of Automotive Door Using Upfront CAE

1998-09-29
982383
The traditional moveable glass window seal development process has relied heavily on physical prototypes for design verification. Due to frequent styling changes and an overall reduction in design time, physical prototypes for the glass window seals have proven to be inadequate. Utilization of computer aided engineering (CAE) tools is necessary in order to shorten lead time. CAE tools will help to decrease expensive prototyping, free up valuable manufacturing line time, and improve overall quality. A cross functional approach has been applied to expand the scope beyond traditional methods of moveable glass window seal design, such as wedged boarding, into new computerized modeling methods. The CAE was used to address major requirements of the glass window seals including glass velocity, glass stall force, sealing-ability, seal durability, seal assembly, seal appearance, and regulator motor current.
Technical Paper

Laser & Fine Plasma Trimming of Sheet Metal Parts for Low Volume Production

1998-09-29
982333
This study compared laser and fine plasma technology for cutting typical electro-galvanized steel and aluminum automotive stampings. Comparisons were made of various aspects of cut quality, accuracy, disturbance of parent material, cycle time, and capital and operating costs. A sensitivity analysis was included to determine how different scenarios would impact the operating costs. It was found that both processes were capable of high quality cuts at 3800mm/min. Capital savings were achievable through the fine plasma system, but careful consideration of the specific application was essential. This work will allow for an advised comparison of options for sheet metal flexible cutting.
Technical Paper

Laboratory Testing of Cabin Air Filters for the Removal of Reduced-Sulfur Odors

1998-02-23
980873
The next generation of cabin air filters will include the ability to remove not only particulate matter, but odors as well. A key element in the development of odor removal filters is the design of laboratory tests to predict in-service performance. The studies described in this report used a combination of subjective and objective test methods to evaluate a series of odor-removal filters for their ability to remove environmentally significant reduced sulfur compounds. The work was performed in two parts. In the first part the detection, recognition, and annoyance thresholds for hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan were measured using a 37-member odor panel. The second part consisted of a group of tests in which the contaminant concentrations upstream and downstream of six types of filters were measured using an instrumental method.
Technical Paper

Light Truck Stabilizer Bar Attachment Non-linear Fatigue Analysis

1998-11-16
982833
The stabilizer bar attachments problem can not be simply analyzed by using linear FEA methodology. The large deformation in the bushing, the elastic-plastic material property in the bushing retainer bracket, and the contact between different parts all add complexity to the problem and result in the need for an analysis method using a non-linear code, such as ABAQUS. The material properties of the bushing were experimentally determined and applied to the CAE model. It was found that using strains to estimate the fatigue life was more accurate and reliable than using stress. Many modeling techniques used in this analysis were able to improve analysis efficiency.
Technical Paper

Mechanical Drag Model for an Electric Machine

2017-03-28
2017-01-1230
Mechanical losses in electric machines can contribute significantly to overall system losses in an electric drive [1]. With a permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM), measuring mechanical losses is difficult without an un-magnetized rotor. Even with an un-magnetized rotor, physical testing can be time consuming and expensive. This paper presents a simple theoretical model of mechanical drag in an electric machine. The model was built using calculations for bearing, seal, and windage drag and was compared to experimental results from testing with un-magnetized motors. Based on this information, the model was modified to better represent the physical system. The goal of this work is to understand the contributors to mechanical drag, to be able to estimate mechanical losses without physical testing, and to be able to quickly evaluate design choices that could reduce mechanical losses.
Technical Paper

Pole-Phase Modulation Motor Drives to Extend Torque-Speed Capability for xEV Applications

2017-03-28
2017-01-1235
Electric vehicles (EV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) require high torque/acceleration ability and wide speed range. To meet both of them, the traction machines usually have to be oversized, which results in high volume and weight, high cost, and low efficiency. In practical application, high speed motors combining with gear box provide the expected torque and speed capability. If pole-changing machines are employed to achieve wide torque and speed ranges, gear box and motor size can be reduced in EVs/HEVs. This paper presents a pole-phase modulation motor drive which changes both of poles and phases simultaneously, as a result that the motor extends its torque/speed capability in a flexible way. Simulation results verify the principle and control method for this kind of motor drives.
Technical Paper

Virtual Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurement

2017-03-28
2017-01-1065
Exhaust temperature models are widely used in the automotive industry to estimate catalyst and exhaust gas temperatures and to protect the catalyst and other vehicle hardware against over-temperature conditions. Modeled exhaust temperatures rely on air, fuel, and spark measurements to make their estimate. Errors in any of these measurements can have a large impact on the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, air-fuel imbalances, air leaks, engine coolant temperature (ECT) or air charge temperature (ACT) inaccuracies, or any unforeseen source of heat entering the exhaust may have a large impact on the accuracy of the modeled estimate. Modern universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensors have heaters with controllers to precisely regulate the oxygen sensing element temperature. These controllers are duty cycle based and supply more or less current to the heating element depending on the temperature of the surrounding exhaust gas.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Head Gasket Fretting/Scrub Mechanism Investigation and Analysis Procedure Developments

2017-03-28
2017-01-1091
Typically, modern automotive engine designs include separate cylinder heads and cylinder blocks and utilize a multilayer steel head gasket to seal the resulting joint. Cylinder head bolts are used to hold the joint together and the non-linear properties of head gasket provide capability to seal the movement within the joint, which is essential for engine durability and performance. There are three major failure modes for head gasket joint: fluid or gas leakage due to low sealing pressure, head gasket bead cracking due to high gap alternation and scrubbing/fretting due to pressure and temperature fluctuations causing lateral movement in the joint. During engine operation, the head gasket design should be robust enough to prevent all three failure modes and the resulting design must consider all three major failure modes to provide acceptable performance.
Technical Paper

An Object-Oriented Approach to the Post-Processing of Cylinder Bore Distortion, Valve Seat Distortion, Valve Guide-to-Seat Misalignment and Cam Bore Misalignment

2017-03-28
2017-01-1075
In CAE analysis of cylinder bore distortion, valve seat distortion, valve guide-to-seat misalignment and cam bore misalignment, nodal displacements on the cylinder bore inner surface and on the gage lines of valve seats, valve guides and cam bores are typically output. Best fit cylinders, best fit circles and best fit lines are computed by utilizing the output displacements of the deformed configuration. Based on the information of the best fit geometry, distortions and misalignments are assessed. Some commercial and in-house software is available to compute the best fit cylinders, best fit circles and best fit lines. However, they suffer from the drawback that only one best-fit geometry can be computed at a time. Using this kind of software to assess distortions and misalignments of engine components would be tedious and prone to error, since data transfer as well as the intermediate computation has to be done by hand, and the process is not automatic.
Technical Paper

CAE Simulation of Engine Oil Pump Tonal Noise: Design Modifications and Countermeasures

2017-03-28
2017-01-1076
In this presentation, two cases of CAE simulations of oil pump-induced tonal noises are presented. The first case involves oil pump-induced whine in an I4engine during coast down. The second case addresses oil pan moan during hot idle and the effect of oil pump pick-up tube positioning inside the oil pan of an I5 engine. The investigations include several design modifications to the pump and the pick-up tube to prevent the tonal noise. Test data are also included to demonstrate the accuracy of the CAE simulation.
Technical Paper

Ting Noise Generation in Automotive Applications

2017-03-28
2017-01-1121
Automobile customers are looking for higher performance and quieter comfortable rides. The driveline of a vehicle can be a substantial source of NVH issues. This paper provides an understanding of a driveline noise issue which can affect any variant of driveline architecture (FWD, AWD, RWD and 4X4). This metallic noise is mostly present during the take-off and appropriately termed as ting noise. This noise was not prevalent in the past. For higher fuel economy, OEMs started integrating several components for lighter subsystems. This in effect made the system more sensitive to the excitation. At present the issue is addressed by adding a ting washer in the interface of the wheel hub bearings and the halfshafts. This paper explains the physics behind the excitation and defines the parameters that influence the excitation. The halfshaft and the wheel hub are assembled with a specified hub nut torque.
X