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Technical Paper

The Effects of Natural Aging on Fleet and Durability Vehicle Engine Mounts from a Dynamic Characterization Perspective

2001-04-30
2001-01-1449
Elastomers are traditionally designed for use in applications that require specific mechanical properties. Unfortunately, these properties change with respect to many different variables including heat, light, fatigue, oxygen, ozone, and the catalytic effects of trace elements. When elastomeric mounts are designed for NVH use in vehicles, they are designed to isolate specific unwanted frequencies. As the elastomers age however, the desired elastomeric properties may have changed with time. This study looks at the variability seen in new vehicle engine mounts and how the dynamic properties change with respect to miles accumulated on fleet and durability test vehicles.
Technical Paper

The Effect of High Mileage Spot Weld Degradation on Vehicle Body Joint Stiffness

2001-03-05
2001-01-0426
Joint stiffness is a major contributor to the vehicle body overall bending and torsional stiffness which in turn affects the vehicle NVH performance. Each joint consists of spot welds which function as load paths between adjacent sheet metal. Spot welds tend to lose structural integrity as a result of fatigue, loosening, aging, wear and corrosion of parts as a vehicle accumulates mileage. Experimental methods are used to identify potential degradation mechanisms associated with a spot weld. A CAE model which simulates a vehicle body joint generically is used to determine the effects of each individual degradation mode of a spot weld on joint stiffness. A real life B-pillar to roof joint CAE model of a production vehicle is then employed to examine the significance of weld distribution on joint stiffness degradation. The knowledge derived from this study can be used as a guidance in designing vehicle body structures with respect to spot weld distribution.
Technical Paper

Thermal Fatigue of Automotive Components

2001-03-05
2001-01-0829
Modern approaches for thermal fatigue damage assessment in automotive components are discussed. Three prominent methods are reviewed, and issues with related material testing, numerical implementations and applications to general thermal cycles are presented. In summary, the chosen methods can produce good thermal fatigue life predictions. Common difficulties include first, prolonged experimental programs to determine the required material parameters, and second, significant computational times involved in analysis of realistic models and loading histories.
Technical Paper

Interaction Between ATFs and Friction Material for Modulated Torque Converter Clutches

1998-02-23
981098
Automatic transmissions equipped with Modulated Torque Converter Clutches (MTCC) require an effective combination of automatic transmission fluid (ATF) - friction material in order to maintain frictional integrity. However, in this study, thermal analysis has shown that ATFs can interact chemically with a friction material used in the MTCC under service conditions, potentially affecting the frictional characteristics. A technique was developed to evaluate friction material degradation. The results of this study showed that the friction material my be chemically altered by static aging in certain ATFs at elevated temperatures. The statically aged friction material samples exhibited thermal analysis signatures which were similar to identical material degraded during dynamometer and fleet vehicle tests. These vehicle tests resulted in deterioration in friction characteristics and experienced shudder.
Technical Paper

Piston Ring / Cylinder Bore Friction Under Flooded and Starved Lubrication Using Fresh and Aged Engine Oils

1998-10-19
982659
The friction reducing capability of engine oils in the piston ring/cylinder bore contact was investigated under fully-flooded and starved lubrication conditions at 100° C using a laboratory piston ring/cylinder bore friction rig. The rig is designed to acquire instantaneous transient measurements of applied loads and friction forces at the ring/bore interface in reciprocating motion over a 50.8 mm stroke. The effects of increasing load and speed on the friction coefficient have been compared with new and used engine oils of different viscosity that were formulated with and without friction modifying additives. Test results with fully formulated engine oils containing molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) show that friction is always lower than that obtained with non-friction modified oils but in regions of persistent starvation the coefficient of friction can increase significantly, approaching levels equivalent to fully-flooded non-friction modified formulations.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Methods for Evaluating Automatic Transmission Fluid Effects on Friction Torque Capacity - A Study by the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee (ILSAC) ATF Subcommittee

1998-10-19
982672
As part of the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee's (ILSAC) goal of developing a global automatic transmission fluid (ATF) specification, members have been evaluating test methods that are currently used by various automotive manufacturers for qualifying ATF for use in their respective transmissions. This report deals with comparing test methods used for determining torque capacity in friction systems (shifting clutches). Three test methods were compared, the Plate Friction Test from the General Motors DEXRON®-III Specification, the Friction Durability Test from the Ford MERCON® Specification, and the Japanese Automotive Manufacturers Association Friction Test - JASO Method 348-95. Eight different fluids were evaluated. Friction parameters used in the comparison were breakaway friction, dynamic friction torque at midpoint and the end of engagement, and the ratio of end torque to midpoint torque.
Technical Paper

Surface and Engine Oil Effects on Journal Bearing Lubrication

1998-05-04
981408
Lubrication conditions in journal bearings lubricated with low friction engine oils have been investigated using two complementary experimental techniques. Load supporting capacity under conditions ranging from fully flooded to mixed lubrication was measured for several candidate oils using a bench test that simulates the dynamic motion of a journal bearing at fixed, measurable eccentricities. The performance of these oils was also assessed using a bearing test rig in which journal friction is measured under typical engine conditions of speed, load and temperature. Significant mixed lubrication conditions were shown to exist at low speeds in heavily loaded journal bearings. Under such conditions, oil with friction reducing additives exhibit higher load supporting capacity, distinct separation of moving parts, and reduced friction relative to oils without such additives.
Technical Paper

Chassis System Integration Approach for Vehicle High Mileage NVH Robustness

1998-02-23
980903
High mileage NVH performance is one of the major concerns in vehicle design for long term customer satisfaction. Elastomeric bushings and brake rotors are key chassis components which tend to degrade as vehicle mileage accumulates with time. The degradation of these components normally causes the overall degradation of vehicle NVH performance. In the current paper two categories of problems are addressed respectively: road-induced vibration due to bushing degradation, and brake roughness due to rotor wear. A system integration approach is used to derive the design strategies that can potentially make the vehicle more robust in these two NVH attributes. The approach links together bushing degradation characteristics, brake rotor wear characteristics, the design of experiment (DOE) method, and CAE modeling in a systematic fashion. The concept and method are demonstrated using a production vehicle.
Technical Paper

A 2-D Computational Model Describing the Heat Transfer, Reaction Kinetics and Regeneration Characteristics of a Ceramic Diesel Particulate Trap

1998-02-23
980546
A 2-D CFD model was developed to describe the heat transfer, and reaction kinetics in a honeycomb structured ceramic diesel particulate trap. This model describes the steady state as well as the transient behavior of the flow and heat transfer during the trap regeneration processes. The trap temperature profile was determined by numerically solving the 2-D unsteady energy equation including the convective, heat conduction and viscous dissipation terms. The convective terms were based on a 2-D analytical flow field solution derived from the conservation of mass and momentum equations (Opris, 1997). The reaction kinetics were described using a discretized first order Arrhenius function. The 2-D term describing the reaction kinetics and particulate matter conservation of mass was added to the energy equation as a source term in order to represent the particulate matter oxidation. The filtration model describes the particulate matter accumulation in the trap.
Technical Paper

Light Truck Stabilizer Bar Attachment Non-linear Fatigue Analysis

1998-11-16
982833
The stabilizer bar attachments problem can not be simply analyzed by using linear FEA methodology. The large deformation in the bushing, the elastic-plastic material property in the bushing retainer bracket, and the contact between different parts all add complexity to the problem and result in the need for an analysis method using a non-linear code, such as ABAQUS. The material properties of the bushing were experimentally determined and applied to the CAE model. It was found that using strains to estimate the fatigue life was more accurate and reliable than using stress. Many modeling techniques used in this analysis were able to improve analysis efficiency.
Technical Paper

A Thermoviscoplastic FE Model for the Strain Prediction in High Temperature, Thermal Cycling Applications for Silicon Molybdenum Nodular Cast Iron

1998-02-23
980697
The design of components for high temperature, thermal cycling situations has traditionally been a challenging problem because the analysis must compensate for the non-linear behavior of the material. One example for automotive applications is the exhaust manifold, where temperatures may reach 900°C during thermal cycling. Fatigue failure and excessive deformation of these components must be analyzed with thermoviscoplastic models. A Finite Element (FE) model is developed to simulate the material behavior at high temperature, thermal cycling conditions. A specimen of Silicon Molybdenum Nodular Cast Iron (4% Si, 0.8% Mo) is cycled between maximum temperatures of 500°C and 960°C while the stress is measured with respect to time. The model predictions for stress are compared to the experimental results for two rates of thermal cycling. The analysis is conducted with and without creep effects to understand its contribution to the overall strain.
Technical Paper

Serpentine - Extended Life Accessory Drive

1979-02-01
790699
A new automotive accessory drive arrangement known as ‘Serpentine Drive’ has been developed. The said arrangement employs a single, longitudinally ribbed drive belt, “snaking” around all the accessory pulleys to provide the driving force. Belt tension is applied and maintained by an automatic tensioning device, thus, belt slippage, which contributes to belt degeneration through the wear and heat generated in the process is virtually eliminated. Drive belt service life has been considerably increased and maintenance literally eliminated.
Technical Paper

An Overhead Cam Wear and Valvetrain Dynamics Study

1989-09-01
892149
A 22 hour engine test was developed to evaluate the effects of fuels, lubricants, and valvetrain dynamics on the wear of OHC 2.3L engine camshafts and finger followers. Procedures include a break-in to improve test repeatability and a test sequence to allow single-shift operation. A surface analyzer capable of measuring cam lobe wear profiles to micro-inch accuracy provided a quantitative wear comparison. A pure mineral oil, as expected, resulted in higher camshaft wear than using a fully formulated SF lubricant. Cam and follower wear increased significantly when ethanol replaced gasoline as fuel. The combination of ethanol, mineral oil and heavy duty valve springs was selected to increase test severity for hardware discrimination. The average wear of the intake lobes was greater than the exhausts. Kinematic analysis and visual inspection of the valve train mechanism revealed differences in the relative motion and contact stress pattern.
Technical Paper

Paint Bake Influence on AA7075 and AA7085

2017-03-28
2017-01-1265
The typical paint bake cycle includes multiple ramps and dwells of temperature through e-coat, paint, and clear coat with exposure equivalent to approximately 190°C for up to 60 minutes. 7xxx-series aluminum alloys are heat treatable, additional thermal exposure such as a paint bake cycle could alter the material properties. Therefore, this study investigates the response of three 7xxx-series aluminum alloys with respect to conductivity, hardness, and yield strength when exposed to three oven curing cycles of a typical automotive paint operation. The results have indicated that alloy composition and artificial aging practice influence the material response to the various paint bake cycles.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Head Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Risk Assessment under Customer Usage

2017-03-28
2017-01-1086
For aluminum automotive cylinder head designs, one of the concerning failure mechanisms is thermo-mechanical fatigue from changes in engine operating conditions. After an engine is assembled, it goes through many different operating conditions such as cold start, through warm up, peak power, and intermediate cycles. Strain alternation from the variation in engine operation conditions change may cause thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) failure in combustion chamber and exhaust port. Cylinder heads having an integrated exhaust manifold are especially exposed to this failure mode due to the length and complexity of the exhaust gas passage. First a thermo-mechanical fatigue model is developed to simulate a known dynamometer/bench thermal cycle and the corresponding thermo-mechanical fatigue damage is quantified. Additionally, strain state of the cylinder head and its relation to thermo-mechanical fatigue are discussed. The bench test was used to verify the TMF analysis approach.
Technical Paper

Field Risk Assessment Based on Cylinder Head Design Process to Improve High Cycle Fatigue Performance

2017-03-28
2017-01-1085
In a separate SAE paper (Cylinder Head Design Process to Improve High Cycle Fatigue Performance), cylinder head high cycle fatigue (HCF) analysis approach and damage calculation method were developed and presented. In this paper, the HCF damage calculation method is used for risk assessment related to customer drive cycles. Cylinder head HCF damage is generated by repeated stress alternation under different engine operation conditions. The cylinder head high cycle fatigue CAE process can be used as a transfer function to translate engine operating conditions to cylinder head damage/life. There are many inputs, noises, and design parameters that contribute to the cylinder head HCF damage CAE transfer function such as cylinder pressure, component temperature, valve seat press fit, and cylinder head manufacturing method. Material properties and the variation in material properties are also important considerations in the CAE transfer function.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Head Design Process to Improve High Cycle Fatigue Performance

2017-03-28
2017-01-1074
Cylinder head design is a highly challenging task for modern engines, especially for the proliferation of boosted, gasoline direct injection engines (branded EcoBoost® engines by Ford Motor Company). The high power density of these engines results in higher cylinder firing pressures and higher operating temperatures throughout the engine. In addition to the high operating stresses, cylinder heads are normally heat treated to optimize their mechanical properties; residual stresses are generated during heat treatment, which can be detrimental for high-cycle fatigue performance. In this paper, a complete cylinder head high cycle fatigue CAE analysis procedure is demonstrated. First, the heat treatment process is simulated. The transient temperature histories during the quenching process are used to calculate the distribution of the residual stresses, followed by machining simulation, which results in a redistribution of stress.
Technical Paper

High Frequency Sloshing - Energy Dissipation and Viscous Damping through CFD

2017-03-28
2017-01-1317
Liquid sloshing is an important issue in ground transportation, aerospace and automotive applications. Effects of sloshing in a moving liquid container can cause various issues related to vehicle stability, safety, component fatigue, audible noise and, liquid level measurement. The sloshing phenomenon is a highly nonlinear oscillatory movement of the free-surface of liquid inside a container under the effect of continuous or momentarily excitation forces. These excitation forces can result from sudden acceleration, braking, sharp turning or pitching motions. The sloshing waves generated by the excitation forces can impact on the tank surface and cause additional vibrations. For the loads with the frequencies between 2 to 200 Hz, the structural fatigue failure is a major concern for automotive applications.
Technical Paper

An Indirect Tire Health Monitoring System Using On-board Motion Sensors

2017-03-28
2017-01-1626
This paper proposes a method to make diagnostic/prognostic judgment about the health of a tire, in term of its wear, using existing on-board sensor signals. The approach focuses on using an estimate of the effective rolling radius (ERR) for individual tires as one of the main diagnostic/prognostic means and it determines if a tire has significant wear and how long it can be safely driven before tire rotation or tire replacement are required. The ERR is determined from the combination of wheel speed sensor (WSS), Global Positioning sensor (GPS), the other motion sensor signals, together with the radius kinematic model of a rolling tire. The ERR estimation fits the relevant signals to a linear model and utilizes the relationship revealed in the magic formula tire model. The ERR can then be related to multiple sources of uncertainties such as the tire inflation pressure, tire loading changes, and tire wear.
Technical Paper

Technical Analysis of Severe Cornering Induced Tire Wear on Vehicle Limit Handling through Repeatable On-Track Vehicle Testing

2018-04-03
2018-01-0558
In repeated physical testing of vehicles at or near their handling limit, tire shoulder wear occurs that is not typical of normal customer use. It has been observed for decades that this type of severe cornering induced tire wear can have a significant effect on the force and moment characteristics of tires. In this study, the severe cornering wear effect was studied by testing vehicles in a highly controlled manner using a robot steering controller. This testing shows how vehicle response to the exact same steering input changes significantly as the number of runs on the same tires accumulates. In fact, vehicles were found to not lift tires from the ground in initial runs then tip-up hard onto outriggers in later runs as the tires are abraded. Additionally, for one vehicle configuration an additional run was made with tires that had accumulated 16,000 km (10,000 miles) of normal customer usage.
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