Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

Flow-Acoustic Coupling in Quarter-Wave Resonators Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

2001-04-30
2001-01-1430
Quarter-wave resonators are commonly used as acoustic silencers in automotive air induction systems. Similar closed side branches can also be formed in the idle air bypass, exhaust gas recirculation, and positive crankcase ventilation systems of engines. The presence of a mean flow across these side branches can lead to an interaction between the mean flow and the acoustic resonances of the side branch. At discrete flow conditions, this coupling between the flow and acoustic fields may produce high amplitude acoustic pressure pulsations. For the quarter-wave resonator, this interaction can turn the silencer into a noise generator, while for systems where a valve is located at the closed end of the side branch the large pressure pulsations can cause the valve to fail. This phenomenon is not limited to automotive applications, and also occurs in natural gas pipelines, aircraft, and numerous other internal and external flows.
Technical Paper

Serpentine Accessory Belt Drive Tool: Virtual Prototyping for V-Ribbed Belt Drives

2001-04-30
2001-01-1424
Serpentine accessory belts are commonly used in industries such as automotive and general machinery. The purpose of this analytical tool is to provide design engineers the capability to model belt drive systems using ADAMS (Automated Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems). The generated ADAMS models can be used to analyze several different characteristics concerning V-Ribbed belt drive systems. The general solution of the governing nonlinear equations provides the coupled longitudinal and transverse response of the translating belt drive system. Typical simulation outputs include pulley hubloads, belt impact dynamic forces, and belt slip rates at the pulleys.
Technical Paper

Thermal Management for the HEV Liquid-Cooled Electric Machine

2001-05-14
2001-01-1713
The future of the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) is very promising for the automotive industry. In order to take a full advantage of this concept, a better thermal performance of the electric motor is required. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was first verified through several prototypes testing and then is going to be used to execute a series of design of experiment via simulation. Based on the thermal studies in this paper, the integrated coolant jacket design has a better performance than that of separated one. The thermal performance of the stator with the 3M coating is better than the one with paper liner. In addition, using 3M coating reduces the packaging size of the stator.
Technical Paper

Numerical Modeling of Engine Noise Radiation through the use of Acoustic Transfer Vectors - A Case Study

2001-04-30
2001-01-1514
This paper presents the numerical modeling of noise radiated by an engine, using the so-called Acoustic Transfer Vectors and Modal Acoustic Transfer Vectors concept. Acoustic Transfer Vectors are input-output relations between the normal structural velocity of the radiating surface and the sound pressure level at a specific field point and can thus be interpreted as an ensemble of Acoustic Transfer Functions from the surface nodes to a single field point or microphone position. The modal counter part establishes the same acoustic transfer expressed in modal coordinates of the radiating structure. The method is used to evaluate the noise radiated during an engine run-up in the frequency domain. The dynamics of the engine is described using a finite element model loaded with a rpm-dependent excitation. The effectiveness of the method in terms of calculation speed, compared with classical boundary element methods, is illustrated.
Technical Paper

Material Damping Properties: A Comparison of Laboratory Test Methods and the Relationship to In-Vehicle Performance

2001-04-30
2001-01-1466
This paper presents the damping effectiveness of free-layer damping materials through standard Oberst bar testing, solid plate excitation (RTC3) testing, and prediction through numerical schemes. The main objective is to compare damping results from various industry test methods to performance in an automotive body structure. Existing literature on laboratory and vehicle testing of free-layer viscoelastic damping materials has received significant attention in recent history. This has created considerable confusion regarding the appropriateness of different test methods to measure material properties for damping materials/treatments used in vehicles. The ability to use the material properties calculated in these tests in vehicle CAE models has not been extensively examined. Existing literature regarding theory and testing for different industry standard damping measurement techniques is discussed.
Technical Paper

Methodology On The Testing Of The Automobile Mount Dynamic Response

2001-03-05
2001-01-0474
This paper reports the latest development of methodologies for testing and CAE modeling of the automobile mounts. The objective of this study is to provide dynamic mount properties for product evaluation and CAE modeling guideline for crashworthiness simulations. The methodology is divided into component, subsystem and full system levels. The study at the component level is to extract the dynamic parameters of mounts, such as stiffness and damping coefficient, based on the component tests. Furthermore, such parameters are employed to investigate the interaction between mount and connecting structures at the subsystem level. A robust connection mechanism from mount to surrounding structures is also developed during this process. Finally, the results from full vehicle system tests are compared with the CAE simulations to verify the methodology at the component and subsystem levels. A robust component test methodology is the first key element of this study.
Technical Paper

Event-Based Mean-Value Modeling of DI Diesel Engines for Controller Design

2001-03-05
2001-01-1242
Models often use time rather than strokes (crank-angle) as the independent variable to describe engine dynamics despite the fact that the dynamics of an internal combustion engine are intrinsically linked to the combustion events. In this paper, two models are developed in parallel in which not only the independent variable is changed but the notion of mass flows as well: flows are in [g/s] for the time-based model and in [g/st] for the event-based model. Both models are of the same computational complexity and show the same accuracy in validation. The investigation of the model properties shows that variations in the flow-related parameters are reduced by a factor of two to five for the event-based model. However, those of the crankshaft dynamics are increased. It is concluded that the model should be chosen in context of the control system to be designed.
Technical Paper

Modeling of HCCI Combustion and Emissions Using Detailed Chemistry

2001-03-05
2001-01-1029
To help guide the design of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, single and multi-zone models of the concept are developed by coupling the first law of thermodynamics with detailed chemistry of hydrocarbon fuel oxidation and NOx formation. These models are used in parametric studies to determine the effect of heat loss, crevice volume, temperature stratification, fuel-air equivalence ratio, engine speed, and boosting on HCCI engine operation. In the single-zone model, the cylinder is assumed to be adiabatic and its contents homogeneous. Start of combustion and bottom dead center temperatures required for ignition to occur at top dead center are reported for methane, n-heptane, isooctane, and a mixture of 87% isooctane and 13% n-heptane by volume (simulated gasoline) for a variety of operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Powerplant Block-Crank Dynamic Interaction and Radiated Noise Prediction

2003-05-05
2003-01-1735
This paper discusses flexible, multi-body, coupled dynamic simulation of a crankshaft system acting upon a power plant structure that includes an engine block, cylinder heads, oil pan, crank train (i.e., crankshaft, connecting rods, bearings etc.) and transmission. The simulation is conducted using AVL/EXCITE [1]. Engine loads are first predicted, and then used to compute radiated noise from the engine assembly. Radiated noise level is computed by sweeping the excitation frequency through a range associated with the normal operating RPM of the engine. The results of the radiated noise computation are plotted on a “3D” Campbell plot diagram. The effects of different crankshaft materials is evaluated by imposing steel and cast iron material properties on the analysis model. A design of experiment (DOE) study is also performed to investigate the effects of main and rod bearing clearance, damper, and flexplate design on overall engine radiated sound power.
Technical Paper

Frequency Response Assurance Criterion and Applications to Model Correlation of Body Structures

2003-05-05
2003-01-1737
Frequency response functions are frequently used production development to identify correlation levels between designs or between analytical simulation and tests. Frequency Response Assurance Criterion is one effective method to quantify such correlations. However, practical issues such as a large number of FRFs exist and complicated modal characteristics often prevent us using the traditional FRAC analysis. A Group FRAC method was developed and is introduced in this article to resolve these application difficulties. This Group FRAC method enables automatic and efficient processing of large number of FRFs in additional to other improvements. The benefit of using the Group FRAC is evidenced through practical applications.
Technical Paper

Full- and Model-Scale Scrutiny of the Effects of Vehicle Windshield Defrosting and Demisting on Passenger Comfort and Safety

2003-03-03
2003-01-1082
Maintaining adequate visibility at all times, through a vehicle windshield, is critical to the safe usage of the vehicle. The ability of the windshield defrosting and demisting system to quickly and completely melt ice on the outer windshield surface and remove mist formed on the inner surface is therefore of paramount importance. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer on the windshield as well the effect of the air discharge from the defroster vents on passenger comfort. The results presented are from numerical simulations validated by experimental measurements both carried out a model and full-scale. The numerical predictions compare well with the experimental measurements at both scales. The effects of the defrosting and demisting air on occupants' comfort and safety are examined.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Different Methods for Battery and Supercapacitor Modeling

2003-06-23
2003-01-2290
In future vehicles (e.g. fuel cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles), the electrical system will have an important impact on the mechanical systems in the car (e.g. powertrain, steering). Furthermore, this coupling will become increasingly important over time. In order to develop effective designs and appropriate control systems for these systems, it is important that the plant models capture the detailed physical behavior in the system. This paper will describe models of two electrical components, a battery and a supercapacitor, which have been modeled in two ways: (i) modeling the plant and controller using block diagrams in Simulink and (ii) modeling the plant and controller in Dymola followed by compiling this model to an S-function for simulation in Simulink. Both the battery and supercapacitor model are based on impedance spectroscopy measurements and can be used for highly dynamic simulations.
Technical Paper

Drawbeads in Sheet Metal Stamping - A Review

1997-02-24
970986
The paper reviews the role of drawbeads in sheet metal stamping. The design of drawbeads is discussed in depth, with treatment of different bead cross sections, bead end shapes, and bead materials. International standards and practices are included. This is followed by the historical development of the modeling of the drawbead restraining force, starting with basic equilibrium approaches, and leading to the use of the finite element method which permits the study of drawbead effects on sheet metal flow in three dimensions. Finally, the potential of active drawbeads is described based upon ongoing research which is directed toward closed-loop computer control of the stamping process through adjustment of the drawbead penetration.
Technical Paper

Convergence of Laboratory Simulation Test Systems

1998-02-23
981018
Laboratory Simulation Testing is widely accepted as an effective tool for validation of automotive designs. In a simulation test, response data are measured whilst a vehicle is in service or tested at a proving ground. These responses are reproduced in the laboratory by mounting the vehicle or a subassembly of the vehicle in a test rig and applying force and displacements by servo hydraulic actuators. The data required as an input to the servo hydraulics, the drive files, are determined by an iterative procedure which overcomes the non linearity in the test specimen and the test rig system. Under certain circumstances, the iteration does not converge, converges too slowly or converges and then diverges. This paper uses mathematical and computer models in a study of the reasons why systems fail to convergence and makes recommendations about the management of the simulation test.
Technical Paper

Transient CFD Simulations of a Bell Sprayer

1998-09-29
982291
A methodology is developed that incorporates high resolution CFD flowfield information and a particle trajectory simulation, aimed at addressing Paint Transfer Efficiency (PTE) for bell sprayers. Given a solid model for the bell sprayer, the CFD simulation, through automeshing, determines a high resolution Cartesian volume mesh (14-20 million cells). With specified values of the initial shaping air, transient and steady-state flow field information is obtained. A particle trajectory visualization tool called SpraySIM uses this complicated flowfield information to determine the particle trajectories of the paint particles under the influence of drag, gravity and electrostatic potential. The sensitivity of PTE on shaping air velocity, charge-to-mass ratio, potential, and particle diameter are examined.
Technical Paper

Sequence VIB Engine Test for Evaluation of Fuel Efficiency of Engine Oils - Part II. Stage Selection and Time Factor Determination

1998-10-19
982624
The newly developed Sequence VIB engine dynamometer test for measuring the ability of engine oils to improve engine fuel efficiency was designed as an improvement on its predecessor, the Sequence VIA test. The Sequence VIB test features an additional, extended oil aging to correspond to aging of engine oils in certification vehicles and in customer use, and a new set of boundary/mixed and hydrodynamic lubrication stages to better represent a wider range of engines. Five fuel economy measurement stages were chosen for the Sequence VIB test from a larger set of prototype stages, based on extensive friction modeling of engines, analysis of Sequence VIA data on reference oils, and operational considerations. Time factors for these stages were derived based on a mini-mapping of engines considering engine operating conditions in the Metro/Highway Federal fuel economy test procedure (FTP M/H) and the estimated market volume of each engine-vehicle.
Technical Paper

Engine and Aftertreatment Modeling for Gasoline Direct Injection

1998-10-19
982596
Engine and aftertreatment models have been developed in support of gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine development and aftertreatment system design. A brief overview of the engine models that were used to project emissions and fuel economy performance for the GDI engine is presented. Additionally, the construction and validation of a NOx trap aftertreatment model is described in considerable detail. The insights and increased understanding which have been gained regarding the trade-offs between engine out emission targets, aftertreatment performance, and emission constrained fuel economy benefits for direct injection gasoline engines are reviewed and discussed.
Technical Paper

Strain-Rate Characterization of Automotive Steel and the Effect of Strain-Rate in Component Crush Analysis

1998-09-29
982392
The effects of strain-rate and element mesh size on the numerical simulation of an automotive component impacted by a mass dropped from an instrumented drop tower was investigated. For this study, an analysis of a simple steel rail hat-section impacted by a mass moving at an initial velocity of 28Mph was performed using the explicit finite element code Radioss. Three constitutive material models: Elasto-Plastic (without strain rate), Johnson-Cook, and Zerilli-Armstrong were used to characterize the material properties for mild and high strength steel. Results obtained from the numerical analyses were compared to the experimental data for the maximum crush, final deformation shape, average crush force and the force-deflection curve. The results from this study indicate that the mechanical response of steel can be captured utilizing a constitutive material model which accounts for strain rate effect coupled with an average mesh size of 6 to 9mm.
Technical Paper

Use of Polyurethane Material Models for Simulating Leg-Form Impact in Different Explicit Finite Element Codes

1998-09-29
982359
Compressible plastic foams are used throughout the interior and bumper systems of modern automobiles for safety enhancement and damage prevention. Consequently, modeling of foams has become very important for automobile engineers. To date, most work has focused on predicting foam performance up to approximately 80% compression. However, in certain cases, it is important to predict the foam under maximum compression, or ‘bottoming-out.’ This paper uses one such case-a thin low-density bumper foam impacted by a pedestrian leg-form at 11.1 m/s-to investigate the ‘bottoming-out’ phenomenon. Multiple material models in three different explicit Finite Element Method (FEM) packages (RADIOSS, FCRASH, and LS-DYNA) were used to predict the performance. The finite element models consisted of a foam covered leg-form impacting a fixed bumper beam with a foam energy absorber.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Analytically and Experimentally Obtained Residual Fractions and NOX Emissions in Spark-Ignited Engines

1998-10-19
982562
Using a fast-sampling valve, residual-fraction levels were determined in a 2.0L spark-ignited production engine, over varying engine operating conditions. Individual samples for each operating condition were analyzed by gas-chromatography which allowed for the determination of in-cylinder CO and CO2 levels. Through a comparison of in-cylinder measurement and exhaust data measurements, residual molar fraction (RMF) levels were determined and compared to analytical results. Analytical calculations were performed using the General Engine SIMulation (GESIM) which is a steady state quasi-dimensional engine combustion cycle simulation. Analytical RMF levels, for identical engine operating conditions, were compared to the experimental results as well as a sensitivity study on wave-dynamics and heat transfer on the analytically predicted RMF. Similarly, theoretical and experimental NOx emissions were compared and production sensitivity on RMF levels explored.
X