Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Search Results

Technical Paper

Test Bench Results of a Torque Pedal Interpretation with a CVT-Equipped Power Train

1997-02-24
970293
This paper presents the implementation of a torque pedal interpretation scheme in the CVT-equipped hybrid car which is currently being developed at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) as project Hybrid III. At partial load, a duty cycle operation mode is used in order to increase fuel efficiency. A flywheel is used to store excess power of the combustion engine as well as when the speed of the vehicle is decreased, recuperating the energy for reacceleration. A third mode, called highway operation, is used whenever the demanded power at the wheel exceeds a certain limit. A hierarchical controller scheme is implemented to maintain a comparable behavior of the vehicle in all operation modes. Beyond simulations, this controller operates successfully under real time conditions on the dynamic test bench. Test cycles with a human driver have successfully proven the effectiveness of the chosen set of controllers.
Technical Paper

Model Identification for the A/F Path of an SI Engine

1997-02-24
970612
Modern model-based control schemes and their application on different engines need mathematical models for the various dynamic subsystems of interest. Here, the fuel path of an SI engine is investigated. When the engine speed and the throttle angle are kept constant, the fuel path is excited only by the fuel injected. Taking the NO concentration of the exhaust gas as a measure for the air/fuel ratio, models are derived for the wall-wetting dynamics, the gas mixture, as well as for the air/fuel ratio sensor. When only the spark advance is excited, the gas flow dynamics can be studied. A very fast NO measurement device is used as reference. Its time constant is below the segment time of one single cylinder (180° crank angle for a 4-cylinder engine), therefore its dynamics are much faster than the time constants of the systems investigated. A model structure considering the muliplexing effects of the discrete operation of an engine is given for the fuel path of a BMW 1.8 liter engine.
Technical Paper

A New Model for Fuel Supply Dynamics in an SI Engine

1994-03-01
940208
In this paper we introduce an improved model for the fuel supply dynamics in an SI engine. First, we briefly investigate all the thermodynamic phenomena which are assumed to have a significant impact on fuel flow into the cylinder (i.e., fuel atomization, droplet decay, wall-wetting, film evaporation, and mixture flow back). This theoretical analysis results in a basic set of dynamic equations. Unfortunately, these equations are not convenient to use for control purposes. Therefore, we proceed to a simplified formulation. Several unknown parameters remain, describing phenomena which are difficult to quantify, such as heat and material transfer characteristics. These parameters are subject to operating conditions and are not discussed further. In order to validate the model dynamics, we refer to frequency and step response measurements performed on a 4-cylinder, 1.8 liter BMW engine with sequential fuel injection.
Technical Paper

Measurement of the Wall-Wetting Dynamics of a Sequential Injection Spark Ignition Engine

1994-03-01
940447
In this paper the fuel path of a sequentially injected gasoline engine is discussed. Since a fraction of the injected fuel suffers a delay due to the wall-wetting phenomenon, in transient phases a significant deviation of the air-to-fuel ratio from its setpoint can arise. The amount of fuel on the manifold wall and its rate of evaporation cannot be measured directly. Therefore, the effects of the wall-wetting on exhaust lambda and engine torque have to be considered for the identification of the dynamics. The dynamics of the exhaust-gas-oxygen (EGO) sensor is not negligible for the interpretation of the lambda measurement. Since both the dynamics and the statics of a ZrO2 Sensor are very nonlinear, a normal EGO-sensor is not suitable for these investigations. On the other hand, the engine torque is a good measure for the cylinder lambda when all other effects which lead to torque changes can be eliminated.
Technical Paper

Model-Based Adaptive Fuel Control in an SI Engine

1994-03-01
940374
This paper introduces a model-based adaptive controller designed to compensate mixture ratio dynamics in an SI engine. In the basic model the combined dynamics of wall-wetting and oxygen sensor have to be considered because the only information about process dynamics originates from measuring exhaust λ. The controller design is based on the principles of indirect Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC). The indirect approach connotes that explicit identification of the system parameters is required for the determination of the controller parameters. Due to nonlinearities and delays inherent in the process dynamics, an adaptive extended Kalman filter is used for identification purposes. The Kalman filter method has already been described in detail within an earlier paper [1]. It proves to be ideally suited to deal with nonlinear identification problems. The estimated parameters are further used to tune an adaptive observer for wall-wetting dynamics.
Technical Paper

Reynolds Stress Components in the Flow Field of a Motored Reciprocating Engine

1995-02-01
950725
Coincident 3-D velocity measurements have been made in a single-cylinder, motored research engine using a six-beam, three-wavelength LDV system. The engine had a pancake combustion chamber, a compression ratio of 8.0 and was operated with a fixed intake shroud valve position. Measurements have been performed at 600, 1000 and 1500 RPM and at three distinct locations within the combustion chamber. Software coincidence filtering and ensemble averaging have been thereby used for data processing.
Technical Paper

Wall-Wetting Parameters Over the Operating Region of a Sequential Fuel-Injected SI Engine

1998-02-23
980792
In modern engine control applications, there is a distinct trend towards model-based control schemes. There are various reasons for this trend: Physical models allow deeper insights compared to heuristic functions, controllers can be designed faster and more accurately, and the possibility of obtaining an automated application scheme for the final engine to be controlled is a significant advantage. Another reason is that if physical effects can be separated, higher order models can be applied for different subsystems. This is in contrast to heuristic functions where the determination of the various maps poses large problems and is thus only feasible for low order models. One of the most important parts of an engine management system is the air-to-fuel control. The catalytic converter requires the mean air-to-fuel ratio to be very accurate in order to reach its optimal conversion rate. Disturbances from the active carbon filter and other additional devices have to be compensated.
Technical Paper

On-Line Identification Scheme for Various Wall-Wetting Models

1998-02-23
980793
Modern engine management systems increasingly rely on on-line identification schemes. These are used either for self-tuning regulators or the rapid parametrization of controllers. In this paper the on-line parameter identification of the wall-wetting dynamics is studied in detail. The identification is performed by exciting the fuel path dynamics of the engine at a constant operating point. The amount of fuel injected serves as input and the air-to-fuel ratio, which is measured with a linear oxygen sensor, as output. In order to gain precise information about the amount of fuel in the cylinder, a new measurement concept is used. For one, the placement of the lambda sensor close to the exhaust valve minimizes the effects of gas mixing on the measurements. Additionally, by an appropriate collection of the data, the sensor dynamics are bypassed. This is also illustrated by a measurement with a very fast NOx sensor.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Time-Averaged Piston Temperatures and Surface Heat Flux Between a Direct-Fuel Injected and Carbureted Two-Stroke Engine

1998-02-23
980763
Time-averaged temperatures at critical locations on the piston of a direct-fuel injected, two-stroke, 388 cm3, research engine were measured using an infrared telemetry device. The piston temperatures were compared to data [7] of a carbureted version of the two-stroke engine, that was operated at comparable conditions. All temperatures were obtained at wide open throttle, and varying engine speeds (2000-4500 rpm, at 500 rpm intervals). The temperatures were measured in a configuration that allowed for axial heat flux to be determined through the piston. The heat flux was compared to carbureted data [8] obtained using measured piston temperatures as boundary conditions for a computer model, and solving for the heat flux. The direct-fuel-injected piston temperatures and heat fluxes were significantly higher than the carbureted piston. On the exhaust side of the piston, the direct-fuel injected piston temperatures ranged from 33-73 °C higher than the conventional carbureted piston.
Technical Paper

Turbulent Flow Field Characteristics in a Motored Reciprocating Engine

1997-10-01
972833
Coincident 3-d velocity measurements in the flat combustion chamber of a motored single cylinder engine have been performed using Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry. The 3-d LDV System consisted of three beampairs (514nm, 488nm and 476.5nm) and two fiberoptic probes operated in 90° cross-scatter mode obtaining high spatial and temporal resolution as well as high signal quality. Burst Spectrum Analyzers have been thereby used for signal processing. The time histories of the three velocity components have been acquired for moderate engine speeds (600, 1000 and 1500RPM). The swirling motion in the cylinder was also varied by choosing different fixed positions of a shrouded intake valve relative to the intake port. Several measuring locations in the combustion chamber have been studied in order to investigate homogeneity. Mean velocities and fluctuation intensities of the turbulent field were evaluated using ensemble averaging.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Pneumatic Atomization on the Lean Limit and IMEP

1989-02-01
890431
Lean limit characteristics of a pneumatic port fuel injection system is compared to a conventional port fuel injection system. The lean limit was based on the measured peak pressure. Those cycles with peak pressures greater than 105 % of the peak pressure for a nonfiring cycle were counted. Experimental data suggests that there are differences in lean limit characteristics between the two systems studied, indicating that fuel preparation processes in these systems influence the lean limit behaviors. Lean limits are generally richer for pneumatic fuel injection than those for conventional fuel injection. At richer fuel-to-air ratios the pneumatic injector usually resulted in higher torques. A simple model to estimate the evaporation occurring in the inlet manifold provided an explanation for the observed data.
Technical Paper

On-Line Identification of Air-to-Fuel Ratio Dynamics in a Sequentially Injected SI Engine

1993-03-01
930857
The problem of adaptively controlling the mixture ratio can be reduced to the problem of identifying the respective non-linear system dynamics [ 19]. In the present paper, convenient models of the significant dynamic processes, i.e., intake manifold, wall-wetting and oxygen sensor dynamics, arc deduced. We will separate the analysis in terms of an air and a fuel path. Concerning the fuel path we restrict our attention exclusively to linear sensor models in order to keep the modelling overhead small. Nevertheless, considering the overall dynamics, we will have to deal with some inherent non-linearities. Suitable parametrizations of these models with respect to the demands imposed by the filtering techniques are then introduced. In the case of linear dynamics we aim to achieve a linear regression form whereas in the case of non-linear dynamics, we will augment the system state and apply extended Kalman filter theory.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Oil and Coolant Temperatures on Diesel Engine Wear

1977-02-01
770086
A study has been made of piston ring wear and total engine wear using literature data and new experimental results. The main purpose of the study was to establish the effects of oil and coolant temperatures on engine wear. Wear trends that were found in the early 1960's may not be valid any longer because of the development of higher BMEP turbocharged diesel engines, better metallurgical wear surfaces and improved lube oil properties. New data are presented for the purpose of describing present wear trends. A direct-injection, 4-cycle, turbocharged diesel engine was used for the wear tests. The radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the top piston ring chrome face wear. Atomic emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the concentration of wear metals in the oil to determine total engine wear based on iron and lead. The data were analyzed and compared to the results found in the literature from previous investigators.
Technical Paper

Determination of Heat Transfer Augmentation Due to Fuel Spray Impingement in a High-Speed Diesel Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-0843
As the incentive to produce cleaner and more efficient engines increases, diesel engines will become a primary, worldwide solution. Producing diesel engines with higher efficiency and lower emissions requires a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the injected fuel with air as well as with the surfaces inside the combustion chamber. One aspect of this interaction is spray impingement on the piston surface. Impingement on the piston can lead to decreased combustion efficiency, higher emissions, and piston damage due to thermal loading. Modern high-speed diesel engines utilize high pressure common-rail direct-injection systems to primarily improve efficiency and reduce emissions. However, the high injection pressures of these systems increase the likelihood that the injected fuel will impinge on the surface of the piston.
Technical Paper

Correlation of Air Fuel Ratio with Ionization Signal Metrics in a Multicylinder Spark Ignited Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-0584
Accurate individual cylinder Air Fuel Ratio (AFR) feedback provide opportunities for improved engine performance and reduced emissions in spark ignition engines. One potential measurement for individual cylinder AFR is in-cylinder ionization measured by employing the spark plug as a sensor. A number of previous investigations have studied correlations of the ionization signal with AFR and shown promising results. However the studies have typically been limited to single cylinders under restricted operating conditions. This investigation analyzes and characterizes the ionization signals in correlation to individual AFR values obtained from wide-band electrochemical oxygen sensors located in the exhaust runners of each cylinder. Experimental studies for this research were conducted on a 2.0L inline 4 cylinder spark ignited engine with dual independent variable cam phasing and an intake charge motion control valve.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study of Particulate Thermal Oxidation in a Catalyzed Filter During Active Regeneration

2009-04-20
2009-01-1474
Active regeneration experiments were performed on a Cummins 2007 aftertreatment system by hydrocarbon dosing with injection of diesel fuel downstream of the turbocharger. The main objective was to characterize the thermal oxidation rate as a function of temperature and particulate matter (PM) loading of the catalyzed particulate filter (CPF). Partial regeneration tests were carried out to ensure measureable masses are retained in the CPF in order to model the oxidation kinetics. The CPF was subsequently re-loaded to determine the effects of partial regeneration during post-loading. A methodology for gathering particulate data for analysis and determination of thermal oxidation in a CPF system operating in the engine exhaust was developed. Durations of the active regeneration experiments were estimated using previous active regeneration work by Singh et al. 2006 [1] and were adjusted as the experiments progressed using a lumped oxidation model [2, 3].
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Injector Location and Nozzle Design in a Direct-Injection Hydrogen Research Engine

2008-06-23
2008-01-1785
The favorable physical properties of hydrogen (H2) make it an excellent alternative fuel for internal combustion (IC) engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Hydrogen direct injection provides multiple degrees of freedom for engine optimization and influencing the in-cylinder combustion processes. This paper compares the results in the mixture formation and combustion behavior of a hydrogen direct-injected single-cylinder research engine using two different injector locations as well as various injector nozzle designs. For this study the research engine was equipped with a specially designed cylinder head that allows accommodating a hydrogen injector in a side location between the intake valves as well as in the center location adjacent to the spark plug.
Technical Paper

Development of a Micro-Engine Testing System

2012-10-23
2012-32-0105
A test stand was developed to evaluate an 11.5 cc, two-stroke, internal combustion engine in anticipation of future combustion system modifications. Detailed engine testing and analysis often requires complex, specialized, and expensive equipment, which can be problematic for research budgets. This problem is compounded by the fact that testing “micro” engines involves low flow rates, high rotational speeds, and compact dimensions which demand high-accuracy, high-speed, and compact measurement systems. On a limited budget, the task of developing a micro-engine testing system for advanced development appears quite challenging, but with careful component selection it can be accomplished. The anticipated engine investigation includes performance testing, fuel system calibration, and combustion analysis. To complete this testing, a custom test system was developed.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Spark Ignition Events in Lean and Dilute Methane/Air Mixtures Using a Detailed Energy Deposition Model

2016-04-05
2016-01-0609
It is beneficial but challenging to operate spark-ignition engines under highly lean and dilute conditions. The unstable ignition behavior can result in downgraded combustion performance in engine cylinders. Numerical approach is serving as a promising tool to identify the ignition requirements by providing insight into the complex physical/chemical phenomena. An effort to simulate the early stage of flame kernel initiation in lean and dilute fuel/air mixture has been made and discussed in this paper. The simulations are set to validate against laboratory results of spark ignition behavior in a constant volume combustion vessel. In order to present a practical as well as comprehensive ignition model, the simulations are performed by taking into consideration the discharge circuit analysis, the detailed reaction mechanism, and local heat transfer between the flame kernel and spark plug.
Technical Paper

An Experimental and Computational Investigation of Water Condensation inside the Tubes of an Automotive Compact Charge Air Cooler

2016-04-05
2016-01-0224
To address the need of increasing fuel economy requirements, automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are increasing the number of turbocharged engines in their powertrain line-ups. The turbine-driven technology uses a forced induction device, which increases engine performance by increasing the density of the air charge being drawn into the cylinder. Denser air allows more fuel to be introduced into the combustion chamber, thus increasing engine performance. During the inlet air compression process, the air is heated to temperatures that can result in pre-ignition resulting and reduced engine functionality. The introduction of the charge air cooler (CAC) is therefore, necessary to extract heat created during the compression process. The present research describes the physics and develops the optimized simulation method that defines the process and gives insight into the development of CACs.
X