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Technical Paper

Simultaneous Reduction of Diesel Particulate and NOx Using a Plasma

1994-10-01
942070
A non-thermal plasma treatment of diesel engine exhaust was effective in removing particulate (soot) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from two different light-duty diesel vehicles: an older-technology indirect-injection Toyota truck, and a newer-technology direct-injection Dodge truck. Particulate removal efficiencies and NOx conversion efficiencies were determined at space velocities up to 20,000/hr. Particulate removal efficiencies were above 60 percent for most conditions, but decreased with increasing space velocities. Conversion efficiencies for NOx and carbon monoxide (CO) were also dependent on the space velocity. The NOx conversion efficiencies were generally greater than 40 percent at space velocities less than 7000/hr. The CO concentration increased through the plasma reaction bed indicating that CO was produced by reactions in the plasma.
Technical Paper

Design and Development of Catalytic Converters for Diesels

1992-09-01
921677
Improvements in diesel engine design to reduce particulate emissions levels, and a recent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ruling limiting the maximum sulfur content in diesel fuel, enhanced the viability of catalytic aftertreatment for this market. The Department of Emissions Research, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), under contract from the Engine Manufacturers Association, (EMA), conducted a search to identify flow-through catalyst technologies available to reduce particulate emissions without trapping. The search revealed a variety of catalyst formulations, washcoats, and substrate designs which were screened on a light-duty diesel. Based on the performance of eighteen converters evaluated, several designs were selected to continue experimentation on a modern technology heavy-duty diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Petroleum and Alternate-Source Diesel Fuel Effects on Light-Duty Diesel Emissions

1983-10-31
831712
Exhaust emission data from several fuel effects studies were normalized and subjected to statistical analyses. The goal of this work was to determine whether emission effects of property variation in alternate-source fuels were similar, less pronounced, or more pronounced than the effects of property variation in petroleum fuels. A literature search was conducted, reviewing hundreds of studies and finally selecting nine which dealt with fuel property effects on emissions. From these studies, 15 test cases were reported. Due to the wide variety of vehicles, fuels, test cycles, and measurement techniques used in the studies, a method to relate them all in terms of general trends was developed. Statistics and methods used included bivariate correlation coefficients, regression analysis, scattergrams and goodness-of-fit determinations.
Technical Paper

Using Advanced Emission Control Systems to Demonstrate LEV II ULEV on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles

1999-03-01
1999-01-0774
A program to demonstrate the performance of advanced emission control systems in light of the California LEV II light-duty vehicle standards and the EPA's consideration of Tier II emission standards was conducted. Two passenger cars and one light-duty pick-up truck were selected for testing, modification, and emission system performance tuning. All vehicles were 1997 Federal Tier I compliant. The advanced emission control technologies evaluated in this program included advanced three-way catalysts, high cell density substrates, and advanced thermally insulated exhaust components. Using these engine-aged advanced emission control technologies and modified stock engine control strategies (control modifications were made using an ERIC computer intercept/control system), each of the three test vehicles demonstrated FTP emission levels below the proposed California LEV II 193,000 km (120,000 mile) ULEV levels.
Technical Paper

Phased Air/Fuel Ratio Perturbation - A Fuel Control Technique for Improved Catalyst Efficiency

2000-03-06
2000-01-0891
This paper describes the results of a study that examined the mechanism of phased perturbation as an emissions control technique. Phased perturbation involves independently controlling the fuel delivered to each bank of a dual bank engine (or each cylinder of a single manifold engine), which allows the two banks to have an adjustable, relative Air/Fuel (A/F) perturbation phase-shift from one another. The phase shifted exhaust is then recombined to achieve a near stoichiometric mixture prior to entering a single underbody catalyst. Phase shifting the exhaust Air/Fuel ratio creates a situation in which both rich exhaust constituents (unburnt hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide) and lean exhaust constituents (oxygen and oxides of nitrogen) arrive at the catalyst at the same time. The results of the study showed that phased perturbation produced a significant effect on A/F control and catalyst THC, CO, and NOx efficiency.
Technical Paper

Development of a Methodology to Separate Thermal from Oil Aging of a Catalyst Using a Gasoline-Fueled Burner System

2003-03-03
2003-01-0663
Typically, an engine/dynamometer thermal aging cycle contains combinations of elevated catalyst inlet temperatures, chemical reaction-induced thermal excursions (simulating misfire events), and average air/fuel ratio's (AFR's) to create a condition that accelerates the aging of the test part. In theory, thermal aging is predominantly a function of the time at an exposure temperature. Therefore, if a burner system can be used to simulate the exhaust AFR and catalyst inlet and bed temperature profile generated by an engine running an accelerated aging cycle, then a catalyst should thermally age the same when exposed to either exhaust stream. This paper describes the results of a study that examined the aging difference between six like catalysts aged using the Rapid Aging Test (RAT) cycle (an accelerated thermal aging cycle). Three catalysts were aged using a gasoline-fueled engine aging stand; the other three were aged using a computer controlled burner system.
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