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Technical Paper

Control Strategies for a Series-Parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle

2001-03-05
2001-01-1354
Living in the era of rising environmental sensibility and increasing gasoline prices, the development of a new environmentally friendly generation of vehicles becomes a necessity. Hybrid electric vehicles are one means of increasing propulsion system efficiency and decreasing pollutant emissions. In this paper, the series-parallel power-split configuration for Michigan Technological University's FutureTruck is analyzed. Mathematical equations that describe the hybrid power-split transmission are derived. The vehicle's differential equations of motion are developed and the system's need for a controller is shown. The engine's brake power and brake specific fuel consumption, as a function of its speed and throttle position, are experimentally determined. A control strategy is proposed to achieve fuel efficient engine operation. The developed control strategy has been implemented in a vehicle simulation and in the test vehicle.
Technical Paper

The 1989 Formula SAE Student Design Competition

1990-02-01
900840
Forty-five cars were entered from 37 universities across the U.S. and Canada in the ninth annual Formula SAE Student Design Competition held on May 25, 26 and 27 at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). Thirty-six cars from 31 schools actually competed, but only 22 cars finished. The event included many firsts in Formula SAE. The SAE South Texas Section set a precedent by co-hosting the competition with the UTSA. The GM Sunraycer display and demonstration exhibited high technology and corporate support of Formula SAE. Total award funds (from various sponsors) exceeded those of previous events. New awards were given by new sponsors in 1989.
Technical Paper

Effect of State of Charge Constraints on Fuel Economy and Battery Aging when Using the Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy

2018-04-03
2018-01-1002
Battery State of Charge (SOC) constraints are used to prevent the battery in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) from over-charging or over-discharging. These constraints strongly influence the power-split of the HEV. This paper presents results on how Battery State of Charge (SOC) constraints effects Lithium ion battery aging and fuel economy when using the Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy (ECMS). The vehicle studied is the Honda Civic Hybrid. The battery used is A123 Systems’ ANR26650 battery cell. Vehicle simulation uses multiple combinations of highway and city drive cycles. For each combination of drive cycles, nine SOC constraints ranges are used. Battery aging is evaluated using a semi-empirical model combined with the accumulated Ah-throughput method which uses, as an input, the battery SOC trajectory from the vehicle simulations. The simulation results provide insight into how SOC constraints effect fuel economy as well as battery aging.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study of Wet-Brake Friction

1985-09-01
851575
An experimental program was designed to determine friction characteristics between brake pads and metal rotors that could indicate a brake fluid's propensity to cause chatter in wet-brakes. Friction was measured on a bench version of the John Deere wet-brake qualification system. Rotor and pad supports were made very rigid to avoid chatter in the simulator. One type of pad was run on cast-iron and mild steel rotors using two reference oils, one giving unacceptable levels of chatter and the other giving acceptable levels as previously determined in full-scale tests on the Deere system. The outstanding discriminating characteristic was the drop in friction from breakaway of the pad from the rotor. The ratio of the initial drop in the friction coefficient between unacceptable and acceptable oils for all conditions of the testing ranged from 1.7 to 2.0
Technical Paper

Design and Control Considerations for a Series Heavy Duty Hybrid Hydraulic Vehicle

2009-11-02
2009-01-2717
Hybrid hydraulic power trains are a natural fit for heavy duty vehicle applications due to their high power density. This paper describes the analytical formulae available for sizing a series hybrid hydraulic vehicle without changing the engine size. Sizing of pump, accumulator and motor are addressed specifically. A control strategy is also suggested for operating the engine and powertrain pressure close to the best efficiency zones. An example is then given using an FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles) platform with a CAT C7 engine. Simulation results are generated using VPSET (Vehicle Propulsion Systems Evaluation Tool), an SwRI-developed vehicle modeling and simulation tool. The hydraulic components are sized according to the recommendations in this paper. The suggested control strategy is implemented in VPSET and performance of the series hydraulic hybrid configuration is compared with that of a conventional powertrain.
Technical Paper

Mild Regenerative Braking to Enhance Fuel Economy via Lowered Engine Load Due to Alternator

2008-10-12
2008-01-2560
Brake energy recovery is one of the key components in today's hybrid vehicles that allows for increased fuel economy. Typically, major engineering changes are required in the drivetrain to achieve these gains. The objective of this paper is to present a concept of capturing brake energy in a mild hybrid approach without any major modifications to the drivetrain or other vehicular systems. With fuel costs rising, the additional component cost incurred in the presented concept may be recovered quickly. In today's vehicles, alternators supply the electrical power for the engine and vehicle accessories whenever the engine is running. As vehicle electrical demands increase, this load is an ever-increasing part of the engine's output, negatively impacting fuel economy. By using a regenerative device (alternator) on the drive shaft (or any other part of the power train), electrical energy can be captured during braking.
Technical Paper

Wood-to-Wheels: A Multidisciplinary Research Initiative in Sustainable Transportation Utilizing Fuels and Co-Products from Forest Resources

2008-10-20
2008-21-0026
Michigan Technological University has established a broad-based university-wide research initiative, termed Wood-to-Wheels (W2W), to develop and evaluate improved technologies for growing, harvesting, converting, and using woody biomass in renewable transportation fuel applications. The W2W program bridges the entire biomass development-production-consumption life cycle with research in areas including forest resources, bioprocessing, engine/vehicle systems, and sustainable decisions. The W2W chain establishes a closed cycle of carbon between the atmosphere, woody biomass, fuels, and vehicular systems that can reduce the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere. This paper will summarize the activities associated with the Wood-to-Wheels initiative and describe challenges and the potential benefits that are achievable.
Technical Paper

Scuderi Split Cycle Engine: Air Hybrid Vehicle Powertrain Simulation Study

2012-04-16
2012-01-1013
The Scuderi engine is a split cycle design that divides the four strokes of a conventional combustion cycle over two paired cylinders, one intake/compression cylinder and one power/exhaust cylinder, connected by a crossover port. This configuration provides potential benefits to the combustion process, as well as presenting some challenges; it also creates the possibility for pneumatic hybridization of the engine. This paper presents the methodology and results of a comprehensive study to investigate the benefits of air hybrid operation with the Scuderi Split Cycle (SSC) engine. Four air hybrid operating modes are made possible by the Split Cycle configuration, namely air compressor, air expander, air expander & firing and firing & charging. The predicted operating requirements for each individual operating mode are established. The air and fuel flow of the individual modes are fully mapped throughout the engine operating speed and load range and air tank pressure operating range.
Technical Paper

Downspeeding and Supercharging a Diesel Passenger Car for Increased Fuel Economy

2012-04-16
2012-01-0704
The effects of downspeeding and supercharging a passenger car diesel engine were studied through laboratory investigation and vehicle simulation. Changes in the engine operating range, transmission gearing, and shift schedule resulted in improved fuel consumption relative to the baseline turbocharged vehicle while maintaining performance and drivability metrics. A shift schedule optimization technique resulted in fuel economy gains of up to 12% along with a corresponding reduction in transmission shift frequency of up to 55% relative to the baseline turbocharged configuration. First gear acceleration, top gear passing, and 0-60 mph acceleration of the baseline turbocharged vehicle were retained for the downsped supercharged configuration.
Technical Paper

Influence of the Nozzle Geometry of a Diesel Single-Hole Injector on Liquid and Vapor Phase Distributions at Engine-Like Conditions

2013-09-08
2013-24-0038
The paper describes an experimental activity on the spatial and temporal liquid- and vapor-phase distributions of diesel fuel at engine-like conditions. The influence of the k-factor (0 and 1.5) of a single-hole axial-disposed injector (0.100 mm diameter and 10 L/d ratio) has been studied by spraying fuel in an optically-accessible constant-volume combustion vessel. A high-speed imaging system, capable of acquiring Mie-scattering and Schlieren images in a near simultaneous fashion mode along the same line of sight, has been developed at the Michigan Technological University using a high-speed camera and a pulsed-wave LED system. The time resolved pair of schlieren and Mie-scattering images identifies the instantaneous position of both the vapor and liquid phases of the fuel spray, respectively. The studies have been performed at three injection pressures (70, 120 and 180 MPa), 23.9 kg/m3 ambient gas density and 900 K gas temperature in the vessel.
Technical Paper

Solutions to the Clean Snowmobile Challenge - What Works?

2005-10-24
2005-01-3681
The Society of Automotive Engineers' (SAE) Clean Snowmobile Challenge 2004 (CSC 2004) was held at Michigan Technological University in Houghton, Michigan, from March 15 - 20, 2004. The Clean Snowmobile Challenge has been a competition in the SAE Collegiate Design Series since 2000, and began in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, as a response to rising concerns about snowmobiling in environmentally-sensitive areas. Teams from fifteen universities competed in CSC 2004. The winning snowmobile (sled) was developed by the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and featured a four-stroke engine with electronic fuel injection (EFI), a two-stage tuned muffler, and catalytic exhaust aftertreatment. A hybrid-electric design was used to increase the snowmobile's powertrain output and improve acceleration. [8] Teams should be competitive in all events to gain enough points to win the competition.
Technical Paper

Enhancement of Engineering Education through University Competition-Based Events

2006-11-13
2006-32-0049
Engineering education at the University level is enhanced by competition-based projects. The SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge is a prime example of how competition-based engineering education benefits the small engines industry and improves the engineering talent pool of the nation in general. For the past several decades, SAE has encouraged young engineers to compete in designing off road vehicles (Baja SAE ®), small race cars (Formula SAE ®), remote control airplanes (Aero Design ®), high mileage vehicles (Supermileage ®) and robots (Walking Robot ®). Now a new competition, the SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge ™ (CSC), based on designing a cleaner and quieter snowmobile has led to a new path for young engineers to explore the challenges of designing engines that emit less pollution and noise. The paper will summarize the results of the most recent Clean Snowmobile Challenge 2006 and document the successes of the past seven years of the Challenge.
Technical Paper

Analysis of the Ignition Behaviour of the ASTM D-613 Primary Reference Fuels and Full Boiling Range Diesel Fuels in the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT™) - Part III

1999-10-25
1999-01-3591
This paper reports on the third part of a continued study (SAE Papers 961182, 971636) to develop the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT™). Past research has shown that this automated laboratory/refinery apparatus can be used to accurately predict the cetane number of middle distillates and alternative fuels using small sample volumes (< 50 mL). The paper reports on the main objective of a study performed by Advanced Engine Technology Ltd. (AET), in co-operation with its research partners. The primary research objective of this work is to further the understanding of fuel preparation (fuel air mixing) and start of combustion processes in the IQT™. Key to this understanding is the manner in which single molecule compounds and full boiling-range diesel fuels behave during these processes. Insights are provided into the manner in which the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-613 primary reference fuels (PRFs) undergo fuel preparation and start of combustion in the IQT™.
Technical Paper

An Engine Start/Stop System for Improved Fuel Economy

2007-04-16
2007-01-1777
During city traffic or heavily congested roads, a vehicle can consume a substantial amount of fuel idling when the vehicle is stopped. Due to regulation enforcement, auto manufacturers are developing systems to increase the mileage and reduce emissions. Turning off the engine at traffic lights and regenerative braking systems are simple ways to reduce emissions and fuel consumption. In order to develop strong manufacturer and consumer interest, this type of operation needs to be automated such that the stop/start functionality requires no driver interaction and takes place without the intervention of the vehicle operator. Valeo Electrical Systems has developed such a system that replaces the OEM engine alternator with a starter/alternator driven by a standard multi-ribbed V belt. To avoid a break and dual voltage network, this system is based on a 12V electrical system using an Enhanced Power Supply.
Technical Paper

The ASTM Test Monitoring Center - Evolving in a Changing Industry

2000-10-16
2000-01-2946
This paper traces the evolution of the ASTM Test Monitoring Center (TMC) from its modest beginnings in 1976 to the present. Formed as an unbiased and non-aligned group within ASTM Subcommittee D02.B, the TMC operates a reference oil based calibration system that serves both the producers and users of automotive lubricants. Governed by the ASTM Test Monitoring Board, the center's primary mission is to calibrate engine dynamometer test stands used to conduct various ASTM test methods for evaluating lubricant performance. The core services of the TMC have remained the same over its nearly 25 year history. The center stores and distributes ASTM reference oils and is responsible for assuring, through the use of analytical testing, the quality and consistency of the oils. The number of reference oils handled by the TMC has steadily increased over time such that today the center inventories some 100 different formulations having a total volume of 65,000 gallons.
Technical Paper

Powersplit Hybrid Electric Vehicle Control with Electronic Throttle Control (ETC)

2003-10-27
2003-01-3280
This paper analyzes the control of the series-parallel powersplit used in the 2001 Michigan Tech FutureTruck. An electronic throttle controller is implemented and a new control algorithm is proposed and tested. A vehicle simulation has been created in MATLAB and the control algorithm implemented within the simulation. A program written in C has also been created that implements the control algorithm in the test vehicle. The results from both the simulation and test vehicle are presented and discussed and show a 15% increase in fuel economy. With the increase in fuel economy, and through the use of the original exhaust after treatment, lower emissions are also expected.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Human Response From Vehicle Performance Characteristics Using Artificial Neural Networks

2002-05-07
2002-01-1570
This study investigates a methodology in which the general public's subjective interpretation of vehicle handling and performance can be predicted. Several vehicle handling measurements were acquired, and associated metrics calculated, in a controlled setting. Human evaluators were then asked to drive and evaluate each vehicle in a winter driving school setting. Using the acquired data, multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) techniques were used to create and refine mathematical models of human subjective responses. It is shown that artificial neural networks, which have been trained with the sets of objective and subjective data, are both more accurate and more robust than multiple linear regression models created from the same data.
Technical Paper

Windowed Selected Moving Autocorrelation (WSMA), Tri-Correlation (TriC), and Misfire Detection

2005-04-11
2005-01-0647
In this paper, two correlations, Windowed Selected Moving Autocorrelation (WSMA) and Tri-Correlation (TriC), are introduced and discussed. The WSMA is simpler than the conventional autocorrelation. WSMA uses less data points to obtain useful signal content at desired frequencies. The computational requirement is therefore reduced compared to the conventional autocorrelation. The simplified TriC provides improved signal to noise separation capability than WSMA does while still requiring reduced computational effort compared to the standard autocorrelation. Very often, computation resource limitation exists for real-time applications. Therefore, the WSMA and TriC offer more opportunities for real-time monitor and feedback control applications in the frequency domain due to their high efficiencies. As an example, applications in internal combustion (IC) engine misfire detection are presented. Simulation and vehicle test results are also presented in this paper.
Journal Article

Analysis Process for Truck Fuel Efficiency Study

2015-09-29
2015-01-2778
Medium- and Heavy Duty Truck fuel consumption and the resulting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are significant contributors to overall U.S. GHG emissions. Forecasts of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle activity and fuel use predict increased use of freight transport will result in greatly increased GHG emissions in the coming decades. As a result, the National Highway Traffic Administration (NHTSA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a regulation requiring reductions in medium and heavy truck fuel consumption and GHGs beginning in 2014. The agencies are now proposing new regulations that will extend into the next decade, requiring additional fuel consumption and GHG emissions reductions. To support the development of future regulations, a research project was sponsored by NHTSA to look at technologies that could be used for compliance with future regulations.
Journal Article

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Fuel Saving Technology Analysis to Support Phase 2 Regulations

2015-09-29
2015-01-2775
This paper presents the fuel consumption results of engine and vehicle simulation modeling for a wide variety of individual technologies and technology packages applied to a long haul heavy duty vehicle. Based on the simulation modeling, up to 11% in fuel savings is possible using commercially available and emerging technologies applied to a 15L DD15 engine alone. The predicted fuel savings are up to 17% in a Kenworth T700 tractor-trailer unit equipped with a range of vehicle technologies, but using the baseline DD15 diesel engine. A combination of the most aggressive engine and vehicle technologies can provide savings of up to 29%, averaged over a range of drive cycles. Over 30% fuel savings were found with the most aggressive combination on a simulated long haul duty cycle. Note that not all of these technologies may prove to be cost-effective. The fuel savings benefits for individual technologies vary widely depending on the drive cycles and payload.
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