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Technical Paper

Performance Evaluation and Optimization of Diesel Fuel Properties and Chemistry in an HCCI Engine

2009-11-02
2009-01-2645
The nine CRC fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE fuels) have been evaluated in a simple, premixed HCCI engine under varying conditions of fuel rate, air-fuel ratio, and intake temperature. Engine performance was found to vary mainly as a function of combustion phasing as affected by fuel cetane and engine control variables. The data was modeled using statistical techniques involving eigenvector representation of the fuel properties and engine control variables, to define engine response and allow optimization across the fuels for best fuel efficiency. In general, the independent manipulation of intake temperature and air-fuel ratio provided some opportunity for improving combustion efficiency of a specific fuel beyond the direct effect of targeting the optimum combustion phasing of the engine (near 5 CAD ATDC).
Technical Paper

Effect of Narrow Cut Oil Shale Derived Distillates on HCCI Engine Performance

2009-11-02
2009-01-2646
In this investigation, oil shale crude obtained from the Green River Formation in Colorado using Paraho Direct retorting was mildly hydrotreated and distilled to produce 7 narrow boiling point fuels of equal volumes. The resulting derived cetane numbers ranged between 38.3 and 43.9. Fuel chemistry and bulk properties strongly correlated with boiling point. The fuels were run in a simple HCCI engine to evaluate combustion performance. Each cut exhibited elevated NOx emissions, from 150 to 300ppm higher than conventional ULSD under similar conditions. Engine performance and operating range were additionally dictated by distillation temperatures which are a useful predictor variable for this fuel set. In general, cuts with low boiling point achieved optimal HCCI combustion phasing while higher boiling point cuts suffered a 25% fuel economy decrease, compared to conventional diesel under similar HCCI conditions, and incurred heavy engine deposits.
Technical Paper

Influence of the Combustion Energy Release on Surface Accelerations of an HCCI Engine

2009-11-02
2009-01-2741
Large cyclic variability along with increased combustion noise present in low temperature combustion (LTC) modes of internal combustion engines has driven the need for fast response, robust sensors for diagnostics and feedback control. Accelerometers have been shown as a possible technology for diagnostics and feedback control of advanced LTC operation in internal combustion engines. To make better use of this technology, an improved understanding is necessary of the effect of energy release from the combustion process on engine surface vibrations. This study explores the surface acceleration response for a single-cylinder engine operating with homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. Preliminary investigation of the engine surface accelerations is conducted using a finite element analysis of the engine cylinder jacket along with consideration of cylindrical modes of the engine cylinder.
Technical Paper

Performance of Biodiesel Blends of Different FAME Distributions in HCCI Combustion

2009-04-20
2009-01-1342
As the world market develops for biodiesel fuels, it is likely that a wider variety of biodiesels will become available, both locally and globally, and require engines to operate on a wider variety of fuels than experienced today. At the same time, tighter emissions regulations and a drive for improved fuel economy have focused interest on advanced combustion modes such as HCCI or PCCI, which are known to be more sensitive to fuel properties. This research covers two series of biodiesel fuels. In the first, B20 blends of natural methyl esters derived from palm, coconut, rape, soy, and mustard were evaluated at light load in an HCCI research engine to determine combustion and performance characteristics. These fuels showed performance differences between the biodiesels and the base #2 ULSD fuel, but did not allow separation of chemical effects due to the small number of fuels and correlation of various properties.
Technical Paper

The Chemistry, Properties, and HCCI Combustion Behavior of Refinery Streams Derived from Canadian Oil Sands Crude

2008-10-06
2008-01-2406
Diesel fuels derived from different types of crude oil can exhibit different chemistry while still meeting market requirements and specifications. Oil sands derived fuels typically contain a larger proportion of cycloparaffinic compounds, which result from the cracking and hydrotreating of bitumens in the crude. In the current study, 17 refinery streams consisting of finished fuels and process streams were obtained from a refinery using 100% oil sands derived crude oil. All samples except one met the ULSD standard of 15 ppm sulfur. The samples were characterized for properties and chemistry and run in a simple premixed HCCI engine using intake heating for combustion phasing control. Results indicate that the streams could be equally well characterized by chemistry or properties, and some simple correlations are presented. Cetane number was found to relate mainly to mono-aromatic content and the cycloparaffins did not appear to possess any unique diesel related chemical effects.
Technical Paper

The Use of Small Engines as Surrogates for Research in Aftertreatment, Combustion, and Fuels

2006-11-13
2006-32-0035
In this research, small, single cylinder engines have been used to simulate larger engines in the areas of aftertreatment, combustion, and fuel formulation effects. The use of small engines reduces overall research cost and allows more rapid experiments to be run. Because component costs are lower, it is also possible to investigate more variations and to sacrifice components for materials characterization and for subsequent experiments. Using small engines in this way is very successful in some cases. In other cases, limitations of the engines influence the results and need to be accounted for in the experimental design and data analysis. Some of the results achieved or limitations found may be of interest to the small engine market, and this paper is offered as a summary of the authors' research in these areas. Research is being conducted in two areas. First, small engines are being used to study the rapid aging and poisoning of exhaust aftertreatment catalysts.
Technical Paper

Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts by Oil-Derived Phosphorus

2006-10-16
2006-01-3422
The poisoning of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by the engine oil additive zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) is investigated in the present study. A 517cc single-cylinder diesel engine is used to accelerate the phosphorus poisoning of DOCs by artificially increasing the ZDDP consumption to approximately 700 times normal operation by three different methods. These include lube-oil doped fuel, intake manifold, and exhaust manifold injection with lube-oil containing an elevated level of ZDDP. The deactivation of DOCs under these conditions is characterized by a variety of physical and chemical techniques. Surface composition and structure of the poisoned catalysts analyzed with SEM-EDS show differences depending on the method of ZDDP introduction. Exhaust manifold injection produces a zinc phosphate glaze which masks the surface to species diffusion. Fuel and intake manifold injection methods produce chemically absorbed phosphorus on the catalyst washcoat surface.
Technical Paper

The Roles of Phosphorus and Soot on the Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

2009-04-20
2009-01-0628
The deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by soot contamination and lube-oil derived phosphorus poisoning is investigated. Pt/CeO2/γ-AI2O3 DOCs aged using three different protocols developed by the authors and six high mileage field-returned DOCs of similar formulation are evaluated for THC and CO oxidation performance using a bench-flow reactor. Collectively, these catalysts exhibit a variety of phosphorus and soot morphologies contributing to performance deactivation.
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