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Technical Paper

Axial NO2 Utilization Measurements within a Partial Flow Filter during Passive Regeneration

2017-03-28
2017-01-0988
Measuring axial exhaust species concentration distributions within a wall-flow aftertreatment device provides unique and significant insights regarding the performance of complex devices like the SCR-on-filter. In this particular study, a less complex aftertreatment configuration which includes a DOC followed by two uncoated partial flow filters (PFF) was used to demonstrate the potential and challenges. The PFF design in this study was a particulate filter with alternating open and plugged channels. A SpaciMS [1] instrument was used to measure the axial NO2 profiles within adjacent open and plugged channels of each filter element during an extended passive regeneration event using a full-scale engine and catalyst system. By estimating the mass flow through the open and plugged channels, the axial soot load profile history could be assessed.
Technical Paper

Emission Performance of Low Cetane Naphtha as Drop-In Fuel on a Multi-Cylinder Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment System

2017-03-28
2017-01-1000
Greenhouse gas regulations and global economic growth are expected to drive a future demand shift towards diesel fuel in the transportation sector. This may create a market opportunity for cost-effective fuels in the light distillate range if they can be burned as efficiently and cleanly as diesel fuel. In this study, the emission performance of a low cetane number, low research octane number naphtha (CN 34, RON 56) was examined on a production 6-cylinder heavy-duty on-highway truck engine and aftertreatment system. Using only production hardware, both the engine-out and tailpipe emissions were examined during the heavy-duty emission testing cycles using naphtha and ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. Without any modifications to the hardware and software, the tailpipe emissions were comparable when using either naphtha or ULSD on the heavy duty test cycles.
Technical Paper

High Speed H2O Concentration Measurements Using Absorption Spectroscopy to Monitor Exhaust Gas

2009-04-20
2009-01-0239
This paper demonstrates the potential for fast absorption spectroscopy measurements in diesel-engine exhaust to track H2O concentration transients. Wavelength-agile absorption spectroscopy is an optical technique that measures broadband absorption spectra between 10 kHz and 100 MHz. From these measured spectra, gas temperature and absorber concentrations can be determined. We introduce a laser spectroscopy system for high speed (10 μs) diesel exhaust measurements in the presence of significant particulate matter. The sensor can be broadly applicable for understanding the dynamics of EGR distribution, cycle-to-cycle stability, cylinder-to-cylinder charge uniformity, and NOX regeneration strategies. The method precision is 10% and 5%, for individual 10-μs measurements and 2-ms averaged measurements, respectively. The sensitivity or detection limit of the measurement is 0.5% H2O.
Technical Paper

Assessing Reductant Chemistry During In-Cylinder Regeneration of Diesel Lean NOx Traps

2004-10-25
2004-01-3023
Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts are capable of reducing NOx in lean exhaust from diesel engines. NOx is stored on the catalyst during lean operation; then, under rich exhaust conditions, the NOx is released from and reduced by the catalyst. The process of NOx release and reduction is called regeneration. One method of obtaining the rich conditions for regeneration is to inject additional fuel into the engine cylinders while throttling the engine intake air flow to effectively run the engine at rich air:fuel ratios; this method is called “in-cylinder” regeneration. In-cylinder regeneration of LNT catalysts has been demonstrated and is a candidate emission control technique for commercialization of light-duty diesel vehicles to meet future emission regulations. In the study presented here, a 1.7-liter diesel engine with a LNT catalyst system was used to evaluate in-cylinder regeneration techniques.
Journal Article

Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration

2010-10-25
2010-01-2267
Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H₂, CO, NH₃, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.
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