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Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of the Sensitivity of the Performance Criteria of an Automotive Cyclone Particle Separator to CFD Modeling Parameters

2009-04-20
2009-01-1176
Predicting the optimum performance parameters of an automotive cyclone particle separator (separation efficiency and pressure drop) using computational fluid dynamics by varying its geometrical parameters is challenging and a time consuming process due to the highly swirling nature of the flow. This study presents results of three investigations of the performance and design of a cyclone separator: a sensitivity analysis, deterministic optimization and a reliability based design optimization. All three cases involved variation of four geometric parameters that characterize the design of the cyclone.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Fuel Cell Performance and Water Accumulation in a Transparent PEM Fuel Cell

2009-04-20
2009-01-1006
Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells have grown in research and development for many applications due to their high efficiency and humble operating condition requirements. Water management in the cathode region of the PEM fuel cell is an essential and sensitive phenomenon for cold environments and fuel cell’s performance. This paper investigates the behavior of water production by constructing a transparent-cathode PEM fuel cell. The effects of pressure, relative humidity, and cathode stoichiometric ratio on the production of water as a function of time were studied. Each test set is compared to a reference state. The images of water liquid accumulation inside the cathode bipolar plate channels are shown with the corresponding polarization curves.
Technical Paper

An Application of Variation Simulation - Predicting Interior Driveline Vibration Based on Production Variation of Imbalance and Runout

2011-05-17
2011-01-1543
An application of variation simulation for predicting vehicle interior driveline vibration is presented. The model, based on a “Monte Carlo”-style approach, predicts the noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) response of the vehicle driveline based on distributions of imbalance and runout derived from manufacturing production variation (the forcing function) and the vehicle's sensitivity to the forcing function. The model is used to illustrate the change in vehicle interior vibration that results when changes are made to production variation for runout and imbalance of driveline components, and how those same changes result in different responses based on vehicle sensitivity.
Technical Paper

Tensile Test for Polymer Plastics with Extreme Large Elongation Using Quad-Camera Digital Image Correlation

2016-04-05
2016-01-0418
Polymer plastics are widely used in automotive light weight design. Tensile tests are generally used to obtain material stress-strain curves. Due to the natural of the plastic materials, it could be elongated more than several hundred percent of its original length before breaking. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) Analysis is a precise, full field, optical measurement method. It has been accepted as a practical in-field testing method by the industry. However, with the traditional single-camera or dual-camera DIC system, it is nearly impossible to measure the extreme large strain. This paper introduces a unique experimental procedure for large elongation measurement. By utilization of quad-camera DIC system and data stitch technique, the strain history for plastic material under hundreds percent of elongation can be measured. With a quad-camera DIC system, the correlation was conducted between two adjacent cameras.
Technical Paper

Friction Coefficient Evaluation on Aluminum Alloy Sheet Metal Using Digital Image Correlation

2018-04-03
2018-01-1223
The coefficient of friction between surfaces is an important criterion for predicting metal behavior during sheet metal stamping processes. This research introduces an innovative technique to find the coefficient of friction on a lubricated aluminum sheet metal surface by simulating the industrial manufacturing stamping process while using 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC) to track the deformation. During testing, a 5000 series aluminum specimen is placed inside a Stretch-Bend-Draw Simulator (SBDS), which operates with a tensile machine to create a stretch and bend effect. The friction coefficient at the contact point between an alloy sheet metal and a punch tool is calculated using an empirical equation previously developed. In order to solve for the unknown friction coefficient, the load force and the drawback force are both required. The tensile machine software only provides the load force applied on the specimen by the load cell.
Technical Paper

Reliability and Resiliency Definitions for Smart Microgrids Based on Utility Theory

2017-03-28
2017-01-0205
Reliability and resiliency (R&R) definitions differ depending on the system under consideration. Generally, each engineering sector defines relevant R&R metrics pertinent to their system. While this can impede cross-disciplinary engineering projects as well as research, it is a necessary strategy to capture all the relevant system characteristics. This paper highlights the difficulties associated with defining performance of such systems while using smart microgrids as an example. Further, it develops metrics and definitions that are useful in assessing their performance, based on utility theory. A microgrid must not only anticipate load conditions but also tolerate partial failures and remain optimally operating. Many of these failures happen infrequently but unexpectedly and therefore are hard to plan for. We discuss real life failure scenarios and show how the proposed definitions and metrics are beneficial.
Technical Paper

A Decision Analytic Approach to Incorporating Value of Information in Autonomous Systems

2018-04-03
2018-01-0799
Selecting the right transportation platform is challenging, whether it is at a personal level or at an organizational level. In settings where predominantly the functional aspects rule the decision making process, defining the mobility of a vehicle is critical for comparing different offerings and making acquisition decisions. With the advent of intelligent vehicles, exhibiting partial to full autonomy, this challenge is exacerbated. The same vehicle may traverse independently and with greater tolerance for acceleration than human occupied vehicles, while, at the same time struggle with obstacle avoidance. The problem presents itself at the individual vehicle sensing level and also at the vehicle/fleet level. At the sensing and information level, one can be looking at issues of latency, bandwidth and optimal information fusion from multiple sources including privileged sensing. At the overall vehicle level, one focuses more on the ability to complete missions.
Technical Paper

Modified Experimental Approach to Investigate Coefficient of Friction and Wear under Lubricated Fretting Condition by Utilizing SRV Test Machine

2018-04-03
2018-01-0835
Fretting is an important phenomenon that happens in many mechanical parts. It is the main reason in deadly failures in automobiles, airliners, and turbine engines. The damage is noticed between two surfaces clamped together by bolts or rivets that are nominally at rest, but have a small amplitude oscillation because of vibration or local cyclic loading. Fretting damage can be divided into two types. The first type is the fretting fatigue damage where a crack would initiate and propagate at specific location at the interface of the mating surfaces. Cracks usually initiate in the material with lower strength because of the local cyclic loading conditions which eventually lead to full failure. The second type is the fretting wear damage because of external vibration. Researchers have investigated this phenomenon by theoretical modeling and experimental approaches. Although a lot of research has been done on fretting damage, some of the parameters have not been well studied.
Technical Paper

The Role of Second Phase Hard Particles on Hole Stretchability of Two AA6xxx Alloys

2017-03-28
2017-01-0307
The hole stretchability of two Aluminum Alloys (AA6111 and AA6022) are studied by using a two stages integrated finite element framework where the edge geometry and edge damages from the hole piercing processes were considered in the subsequent hole expansion processes. Experimentally it has been found that AA6022 has higher hole expansion ratios than those of AA6111. This observation has been nicely captured by finite element simulations. The main cause of differences have been identified to the volume fractions of the random distributed second phase hard particles which play a critical role in determining the fracture strains of the materials.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study of Springback (Side-Wall-Curl) of Sheet Metal based on the DBS System

2019-04-02
2019-01-1088
Springback is a common phenomenon in automotive manufacturing processes, caused by the elastic recovery of the internal stresses during unloading. A thorough understanding of springback is essential for the design of tools used in sheet metal forming operations. A DBS (Draw-bead Simulator) has been used to simulate the forming process for two different sheet metals: aluminum and steel. Two levels of pulling force and two die radii have been enforced to the experimental process to get different springback. Also, the Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system has been adopted to capture the sheet contour and measure the amount of side-wall-curl (sheet springback) after deformation. This paper presents the influence of the material properties, force, and die radius on the deformation and springback after forming. A thorough understanding of this phenomenon is essential, seeing that any curvature in the part wall can affect quality and sustainability.
Technical Paper

Optical Measurement of Residual Stress at the Deep-Rolled Crankshaft Fillet

2004-03-08
2004-01-1500
Crankshaft fillet is subjected to a cyclic bending stress during operation. Fatigue cracks are observed at the fillet during the fatigue test. Compressive stresses are generated by deep-rolling process in order to increase the surface hardness and improve the fatigue strength. To examine the deep-rolling effect, the residual stresses at the fillet need to be investigated. Incremental hole drilling and ISSR (interferometric strain/slope rosette) method is applied to measure the residual stresses at the bottom of the fillet. Incremental hole drilling process is to gradually remove material and mill a hole on the specimen surface in order to relax stress. The ISSR is composed of three micro-indentations, which are indented near the hole and would generate interferometric fringe patterns upon incident laser beam. With incremental drilling, stress relaxation causes the relieved strains, which in turn cause the shifts of interferometric patterns.
Technical Paper

Determination of Whole Field Residual Strain Measurement Using 3D-DSPI and Incremental Hole Drilling

2006-04-03
2006-01-0764
An experimental setup utilizing 3D-Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) 1,2 and Incremental hole drilling is being applied for the non-contact, fast and accurate determination of residual strain as a function of depth. From the measured phase maps using the DSPI technique we can determine the surface deformations in a whole field area around a drilled hole and thus relate these released strains to the residual strains existing in the material. Incremental hole drilling3,4 has been coupled with residual stress measurement to provide a means to estimate the residual stresses as a function of depth. Unlike the traditional holography with a manualevaluation5 in this case the system can quantitatively determine the deformation data in x, y and z directions for various depth increments and thus finally provides us with the residual strains as a function of depth.
Technical Paper

Design Optimization and Reliability Estimation with Incomplete Uncertainty Information

2006-04-03
2006-01-0962
Existing methods for design optimization under uncertainty assume that a high level of information is available, typically in the form of data. In reality, however, insufficient data prevents correct inference of probability distributions, membership functions, or interval ranges. In this article we use an engine design example to show that optimal design decisions and reliability estimations depend strongly on uncertainty characterization. We contrast the reliability-based optimal designs to the ones obtained using worst-case optimization, and ask the question of how to obtain non-conservative designs with incomplete uncertainty information. We propose an answer to this question through the use of Bayesian statistics. We estimate the truck's engine reliability based only on available samples, and demonstrate that the accuracy of our estimates increases as more samples become available.
Technical Paper

Cycle-Averaged Heat Flux Measurements in a Straight-Pipe Extension of the Exhaust Port of an SI Engine

2006-04-03
2006-01-1033
This paper presents an experimental study of the cycle-averaged, local surface heat transfer, from the exhaust gases to a straight pipe extension of the exhaust port of a four-cylinder spark-ignition (SI) engine, over a wide range of engine operating conditions, from 1000 rpm, light load, through 4000 rpm, full load. The local steady-state heat flux was well correlated by a Nusselt-Reynolds number relationship that included entrance effects. These effects were found to be the major contributor to the local heat transfer augmentation. The Convective Augmentation Factor (CAF), which is defined as the ratio of the measured heat flux to the corresponding heat flux for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow, was found to decrease with increasing Reynolds number and increasing axial distance from the entrance of the test section.
Technical Paper

An Efficient Possibility-Based Design Optimization Method for a Combination of Interval and Random Variables

2007-04-16
2007-01-0553
Reliability-based design optimization accounts for variation. However, it assumes that statistical information is available in the form of fully defined probabilistic distributions. This is not true for a variety of engineering problems where uncertainty is usually given in terms of interval ranges. In this case, interval analysis or possibility theory can be used instead of probability theory. This paper shows how possibility theory can be used in design and presents a computationally efficient sequential optimization algorithm. The algorithm handles problems with only uncertain or a combination of random and uncertain design variables and parameters. It consists of a sequence of cycles composed of a deterministic design optimization followed by a set of worst-case reliability evaluation loops. A crank-slider mechanism example demonstrates the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed sequential algorithm.
Technical Paper

Engine Simulation of a Restricted FSAE Engine, Focusing on Restrictor Modelling

2006-12-05
2006-01-3651
One-dimensional (1D) engine simulation packages are limited in modeling flows through an adverse pressure gradient where boundary layer separation is more likely to occur, as in the case of the diffuser part of the restrictor. The restrictor modeling difficulty usually manifests itself as an engine model that consumes a lot of effort (both computational and from the user) in the modeling of the restrictor. The approach sought in this work was to provide a flow vs pressure drop dependency to the code such that it does not consume too much effort in the analysis of the restrictor. This approach is similar to that used for the valve flow, where a look up table is typically provided for determining the flow. Experimentally determined flow measurements on a thin-plate orifice, a short restrictor and a long restrictor are presented and discussed. The developed model gave excellent results in an acyclic steady-state simulation and is being integrated in the full engine model.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Transient Flow Effects on the Separation Parameters of a Reverse Flow Type Cyclone Particle Separator

2008-04-14
2008-01-0419
This study is concerned with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of flow in an automotive reverse flow type cyclone particle separator using the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) turbulence model. Steady simulations were found to never fully converge, with pressure, velocity and vorticity results exhibiting small oscillations as the solution was iterated further. Transient simulations showed the presence of a main vortex precession that resulted in periodic fluctuations of the flow parameters. Fourier analysis was used to characterize this semi-periodic flow feature and to assess its effect on the two main performance measures of the cyclone: overall pressure drop and particle separation efficiency.
Technical Paper

“The Creation, Development and Implementation of a Lean Systems Course at Oakland University, Rochester, MI”

2005-04-11
2005-01-1798
Countless articles and publications3,4,5 have documented and proven the efficacy, benefits and value of operating within a lean system. Furthermore, there exists common agreement amongst leading organizations successfully implementing a lean system that in order to do so it must take into consideration the entire enterprise, that is, from supplier to customer and everything in between6. One of the core issues this paper addresses is when the optimal time is to train and educate the people who currently have, or will have, influence over the ‘enterprise’.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Aluminum Edge Stretching Limit Using 3D Digital Image Correlation

2015-04-14
2015-01-0594
This paper introduces an industrial application of digital image correlation technique on the measurement of aluminum edge stretching limit. In this study, notch-shape aluminum coupons with three different pre-strain conditions are tested. The edge stretching is proceeded by standard MTS machine. A dual-camera 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system is used for the full field measurement of strain distribution in the thickness direction. Selected air brush is utilized to form a random distributed speckle pattern on the edge of sheet metal. A pair of special optical lens systems are used to observe the small measurement edge area. From the test results, it demonstrate that refer to the notched coupon thickness, pre-tension does not affect the fracture limit; refer to the virgin sheet thickness, the average edge stretch thinning limits show a consistent increasing trend as the pre-stretch strain increased.
Technical Paper

Relative Contributions of Intake and Exhaust Tuning on SI Engine Breathing - A Computational Study

2007-04-16
2007-01-0492
This study examines the contributions and interactions of intake and exhaust tuning on a 4-stroke single-cylinder engine for various engine speeds and valve timings. The parametric study was performed using a 1-D engine simulation model, the combustion sub-model of which was calibrated based on experimental pressure data. Mechanisms by which tuning changes the volumetric efficiency of an engine were studied. Simulation results are compared with established empirical correlations which predict pipe lengths for maximum volumetric efficiency. It was found that intake tuning has a more dominant role in the breathing capability of the engine compared to exhaust tuning and that both are independent from each other. Valve timing was found to have no effect on intake tuning characteristics but to affect exhaust tuning.
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