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Technical Paper

Improving Steering Feel for the National Advanced Driving Simulator

1997-02-24
970567
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC) plans to evolve the state-of-the-art of steering system modeling for driving simulators with the ultimate goal being the development of a high fidelity steering feel model for the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS). The VRTC plans on developing reliable research tools that can be used to determine the necessary features for a steering model that will provide good objective and subjective steering feel. This paper reviews past and continuing work conducted at the VRTC and provides a plan for future work that will achieve this goal.
Technical Paper

Validation Results from Using NADSdyna Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

1997-02-24
970565
This paper presents an evaluation of a vehicle dynamics model intended to be used for the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS). Dynamic validation for high performance simulation is not merely a comparison between experimental and simulation plots. It involves strong insight of vehicle's subsystems mechanics, limitations of the mathematical formulations, and experimental predictions. Lateral, longitudinal, and ride dynamics are evaluated using field test data, and analytical diagnostics. The evaluation includes linear and non-linear range of vehicle dynamics response.
Technical Paper

NVH Research Facilities at The Ohio State University: Existing Facilities and Envisioned Enhancements

1997-05-20
971899
The automotive NVH research infrastructure at Ohio State includes the Center for Automotive Research, the Acoustics and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Gear Dynamics and Gear Noise Research Laboratory. This paper describes the facilities of these laboratories. Two unique existing facilities, namely the transmission error measurement of gears and a laboratory for the experimental measurement of engine breathing systems, will be emphasized. Also covered are the enhancements that are envisioned through a recent grant from the Ohio Board of Regents.
Technical Paper

Soil Compaction of Four-Wheel Drive and Tracked Tractors Under Various Draft Loads

1995-09-01
952098
The soil response to traffic loads as affected by tire inflation pressure, track width and drawbar pull was measured. The change in soil physical properties caused by a John Deere 8870 tractor at two tire pressure settings and CATERPILLAR Challenger 65 and 75 tractors with 64 and 89 cm wide belt tracks, were measured at two load levels; no draft (tractor only) and tractor pulling a 12.5 m field cultivator. The Ohio State University Soil Physical Properties Measurement System was used to measure cone penetration resistance, air permeability, air-filled porosity, and bulk density. The results show the dual overinflated tires caused the greatest change, followed by the CATERPILLAR Challenger 65 track, then the CATERPILLAR Challenger 75 track, and finally dual correctly inflated tires caused the least effect on soil physical properties. These results were consistent at each depth. The effects of the two draft levels give the same ranking of the tractive units.
Technical Paper

The Impact of Injection Timing on In-Cylinder Fuel Distribution in a Natural Gas Powered Engine

1997-05-01
971708
One obstacle hindering the use of port fuel injection in natural gas engines is poor idle performance due to incomplete mixing of the cylinder charge prior to ignition. Fuel injection timing has a strong influence on the mixing process. The purpose of this work is to determine the impact of fuel injection timing on in-cylinder fuel distribution. Equivalence ratio maps have been acquired by Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence in an optical engine with a production cylinder head. Experimental results have been used to determine the injection timing which produces the most uniform fuel distribution for the given engine.
Technical Paper

Tractor-Semitrailer Stability Following a Steer Axle Tire Blowout at Speed and Comparison to Computer Simulation Models

2013-04-08
2013-01-0795
This paper documents the vehicle response of a tractor-semitrailer following a sudden air loss (Blowout) in a steer axle tire while traveling at highway speeds. The study seeks to compare full-scale test data to predicted response from detailed heavy truck computer vehicle dynamics simulation models. Full-scale testing of a tractor-semitrailer experiencing a sudden failure of a steer axle tire was conducted. Vehicle handling parameters were recorded by on-board computers leading up to and immediately following the sudden air loss. Inertial parameters (roll, yaw, pitch, and accelerations) were measured and recorded for the tractor and semitrailer, along with lateral and longitudinal speeds. Steering wheel angle was also recorded. These data are presented and also compared to the results of computer simulation models. The first simulation model, SImulation MOdel Non-linear (SIMON), is a vehicle dynamic simulation model within the Human Vehicle Environment (HVE) software environment.
Technical Paper

A Statistical Approach to Assess the Impact of Road Events on PHEV Performance using Real World Data

2011-04-12
2011-01-0875
Plug in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have gained interest over last decade due to their increased fuel economy and ability to displace some petroleum fuel with electricity from power grid. Given the complexity of this vehicle powertrain, the energy management plays a key role in providing higher fuel economy. The energy management algorithm on PHEVs performs the same task as a hybrid vehicle energy management but it has more freedom in utilizing the battery energy due to the larger battery capacity and ability to be recharged from the power grid. The state of charge (SOC) profile of the battery during the entire driving trip determines the electric energy usage, thus determining overall fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

Addressing Drivability in an Extended Range Electric Vehicle Running an Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy (ECMS)

2011-04-12
2011-01-0911
The EcoCAR Challenge team at The Ohio State University has designed an extended-range electric vehicle capable of 50 miles all-electric range via a 22 kWh lithium-ion battery pack, with range extension and limited parallel operation supplied by a 1.8 L dedicated E85 engine. This vehicle is designed to drastically reduce fuel consumption, while meeting Tier II Bin 5 emissions standards. This vehicle design is implemented in a GM crossover utility vehicle as part of the EcoCAR Challenge. This paper explains the implementation of the vehicle's control strategy in order to maintain high efficiency and improve drivability. The vehicle control strategy employs both distinct operating modes and an Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy (ECMS) to find the most efficient operating point. The ECMS strategy does an online search for the most efficient torque split in order to meet the driver's command.
Technical Paper

Validation of a Roll Simulator for Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles

2012-04-16
2012-01-0241
A two-degree-of-freedom Roll Simulator has been developed to study the occupant kinematics of Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles (ROVs). To validate the roll simulator, test data was collected on a population of ROVs on the market today. J-turn maneuvers were performed to find the minimum energy limits required to tip up the vehicles. Two sets of tests were performed: for the first set, 10 vehicles were tested, where the motion was limited by safety outriggers to 10-15 degrees of roll; and for the second set, three of these vehicles were re-tested with outriggers removed and the vehicle motion allowed to reach 90 degrees of roll. These quarter-turn rollover tests were performed autonomously using an Automatic Steering Controller (ASC) and a Brake and Throttle Robot (BTR). Lateral and longitudinal accelerations as well as roll rate and roll angle were recorded for all tests.
Technical Paper

A Study of In-Cylinder Mixing in a Natural Gas Powered Engine by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorcence

1996-05-01
961102
There is currently a large effort in industry to make natural gas a viable alternative fuel for internal combustion engines. While the use of natural gas offers several advantages such as reduced emissions and potentially higher efficiency, it also has some inherent difficulties. Among these is the challenge of producing a consistently homogeneous air/fuel mixture while retaining the advantages which accompany modern, multi-point, fuel injection systems. The purpose of the research described here is to investigate the in-cylinder mixture formation process in a port injected natural gas fueled engine. Planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to produce qualitative air fuel ratio maps in the engine cylinder, in selected planes, throughout the intake and compression strokes. The process consists of impinging a sheet of ultraviolet laser light on various planes parallel to, and normal to, the cylinder axis.
Journal Article

Thermal Mapping of an Automotive Rear Drive Axle

2011-04-12
2011-01-0718
In recent years, there has been a sustained effort by the automotive OEMs and suppliers to improve the vehicle driveline efficiency. This has been in response to customer demands for greater vehicle fuel economy and increasingly stringent government regulations. The automotive rear axle is one of the major sources of power loss in the driveline, and hence represents an area where power loss improvements can have a significant impact on overall vehicle fuel economy. Both the friction induced mechanical losses and the spin losses vary significantly with the operating temperature of the lubricant. Also, the preloads in the bearings can vary due to temperature fluctuations. The temperatures of the lubricant, the gear tooth contacting surfaces, and the bearing contact surfaces are critical to the overall axle performance in terms of power losses, fatigue life, and wear.
Journal Article

An Iterative Markov Chain Approach for Generating Vehicle Driving Cycles

2011-04-12
2011-01-0880
For simulation and analysis of vehicles there is a need to have a means of generating drive cycles which have properties similar to real world driving. A method is presented which uses measured vehicle speed from a number of vehicles to generate a Markov chain model. This Markov chain model is capable of generating drive cycles which match the statistics of the original data set. This Markov model is then used in an iterative fashion to generate drive cycles which match constraints imposed by the user. These constraints could include factors such number of stops, total distance, average speed, or maximum speed. In this paper, systematic analysis was done for a PHEV fleet which consists of 9 PHEVs that were instrumented using data loggers for a period of approximately two years. Statistical analysis using principal component analysis and a clustering approach was carried out for the real world velocity profiles.
Journal Article

Advanced Control Strategies for a Roll Simulator - A Feedback Linearization Technique Explored

2013-04-08
2013-01-0683
This paper presents a feedback linearization control technique as applied to a Roll Simulator. The purpose of the Roll Simulator is to reproduce in-field rollovers of ROVs and study occupant kinematics in a laboratory setting. For a system with known parameters, non-linear dynamics and trajectories, the feedback linearization algorithm cancels out the non-linearities such that the closed-loop dynamics behave in a linear fashion. The control inputs are computed values that are needed to attain certain desired motions. The computed values are a form of inverse dynamics or feed-forward calculation. With increasing system eigenvalue, the controller exhibits greater response time. This, however, puts a greater demand on the translational actuator. The controller also demonstrates that it is able to compensate for and reject a disturbance in force level.
Journal Article

Ignition Delay Correlation for Predicting Autoignition of a Toluene Reference Fuel Blend in Spark Ignition Engines

2011-04-12
2011-01-0338
An ignition delay correlation was developed for a toluene reference fuel (TRF) blend that is representative of automotive gasoline fuels exhibiting two-stage ignition. Ignition delay times for the autoignition of a TRF 91 blend with an antiknock index of 91 were predicted through extensive chemical kinetic modeling in CHEMKIN for a constant volume reactor. The development of the correlation involved determining nonlinear least squares curve fits for these ignition delay predictions corresponding to different inlet pressures and temperatures, a number of fuel-air equivalence ratios, and a range of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates. In addition to NO control, EGR is increasingly being utilized for managing combustion phasing in spark ignition (SI) engines to mitigate knock. Therefore, along with other operating parameters, the effects of EGR on autoignition have been incorporated in the correlation to address the need for predicting ignition delay in SI engines operating with EGR.
Technical Paper

Establishing Occupant Response Metrics on a Roll Simulator

2012-04-16
2012-01-0099
This paper presents the results of an in-depth study of the measurement of occupant kinematic response on the S-E-A Roll Simulator. This roll simulator was built to provide an accurate and repeatable test procedure for the evaluation of occupant protection and restraint systems during roll events within a variety of occupant compartments. In the present work this roll simulator was utilized for minimum-energy, or threshold type, rollover events of recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs). Input profiles for these tests were obtained through a separate study involving autonomous full vehicle tests [1]. During simulated roll events anthropomorphic test device (ATD) responses were measured using on-board high speed video, an optical three-dimensional motion capture system (OCMS) and an array of string potentiometers.
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