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Technical Paper

Global Failure Criteria for SOFC Positive/Electrolyte/Negative (PEN) Structure

2007-04-16
2007-01-0997
Due to mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN (positive/electrolyte/ negative) structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), thermal stresses and warpage on the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. In order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC, it is necessary to develop failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures based on the initial flaws occurred during cell sintering and stack assembly.
Technical Paper

Macroscopic Constitutive Behaviors of Aluminum Honeycombs Under Dynamic Inclined Loads

2007-04-16
2007-01-0979
Macroscopic constitutive behaviors of aluminum 5052-H38 honeycombs under dynamic inclined loads with respect to the out-of-plane direction are investigated by experiments. The results of the dynamic crush tests indicate that as the impact velocity increases, the normal crush strength increases and the shear strength remains nearly the same for a fixed ratio of the normal to shear displacement rate. The experimental results suggest that the macroscopic yield surface of the honeycomb specimens as a function of the impact velocity under the given dynamic inclined loads is not governed by the isotropic hardening rule of the classical plasticity theory. As the impact velocity increases, the shape of the macroscopic yield surface changes, or more specifically, the curvature of the yield surface increases near the pure compression state.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Hydroforming on the Mechanical Properties and Crush Behaviors of Aluminum Tubes

2007-04-16
2007-01-0986
The effect of hydroforming on the mechanical properties and dynamic crush behaviors of tapered aluminum 6063-T4 tubes with octagonal cross section are investigated by experiments. First, the thickness profile of the hydroformed tube is measured by non-destructive examination technique using ultrasonic thickness gauge. The effect of hydroforming on the mechanical properties of the tube is investigated by quasi-static tensile tests of specimens prepared from different regions of the tube based on the thickness profile. The effect of hydroforming on the dynamic crush behaviors of the tube is investigated by axial crush tests under dynamic loads. Specimens and tubes are tested in two different heat treatment conditions: hydroformed-T4 (as-received) and T6. The results of the quasi-static tensile tests for the specimens in hydroformed-T4 condition show different amounts of work hardening depending on the regions, which the specimens are prepared from.
Technical Paper

Optimizing the Advanced Ceramic Material for Diesel Particulate Filter Applications

2007-04-16
2007-01-1124
This paper describes the application of pore-scale filtration simulations to the advanced ceramic material (ACM) developed for use in advanced diesel particulate filters. The application required the generation of a three-dimensional substrate geometry to provide the boundary conditions for the flow model. An innovative stochastic modeling technique was applied matching chord length distribution and the porosity profile of the material. Additional experimental validation was provided by the single-channel experimental apparatus. Results show that the stochastic reconstruction techniques provide flexibility and appropriate accuracy for the modeling efforts. Early investigation efforts imply that needle length may provide a mechanism for adjusting performance of the ACM for diesel particulate filter (DPF) applications. New techniques have been developed to visualize soot deposition in both traditional and new DPF substrate materials.
Technical Paper

Visualization Techniques for Single Channel DPF Systems

2007-04-16
2007-01-1126
New techniques have been developed to visualize soot deposition in both traditional and new diesel particulate filter (DPF) substrate materials using a modified cyanoacrylate fuming technique. Loading experiments have been conducted on a variety of single channel DPF substrates to develop a deeper understanding of soot penetration, soot deposition characteristics, and to confirm modeling results. Early results indicate that stabilizing the soot layer using a vaporized adhesive (Cynoacrylate) may allow analysis of the layer with new methods.
Technical Paper

Selective Reduction of NOx in Oxygen Rich Environments with Plasma-Assisted Catalysis: The Role of Plasma and Reactive Intermediates

2001-09-24
2001-01-3513
The catalytic activity of selected materials (BaY and NaY zeolites, and γ-alumina) for selective NOx reduction in combination with a non-thermal plasma was investigated. Our studies suggest that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, all materials that are active in plasma-assisted catalysis were found to be very effective for the thermal reduction of NOx in the presence of aldehydes. For example, the thermal catalytic activity of a BaY zeolite with aldehydes gives 80-90% NOx removal at 250°C with 200ppm NOx at the inlet and a VHSV=12,000 h-1. The hydrocarbon reductants, n-octane and 1-propyl alcohol, have also shown high thermal catalytic activity for NOx removal over BaY, NaY and γ-alumina.
Technical Paper

Cascade Processing of NOx by Two-Step Discharge/Catalyst Reactors

2001-09-24
2001-01-3509
We present here a phenomenological analysis of a cascade of two-step discharge-catalyst reactors. That is, each step of the cascade consists of a discharge reactor in series with a catalyst bed. These reactors are intended for use in the reduction of tailpipe emission of NOx from diesel engines. The discharge oxidizes NO to NO2, and partially oxidizes HC. The NO2 then reacts on the catalyst bed with hydrocarbons and partially oxidized HCs and is reduced to N2. The cascade may be essential because the best catalysts for this purpose that we have also convert significant fractions of the NO2 back to NO. As we show, reprocessing the gas may not only be necessary, but may also result in energy savings and increased device reliability.
Technical Paper

Multi-Step Discharge/Catalyst Processing of NOx in Synthetic Diesel Exhaust

2001-09-24
2001-01-3510
In the discharge-catalyst treatment of diesel exhaust the discharge chemistry is known to oxidize NO to NO2 as well as to produce partially oxidized hydrocarbons for the heterogeneous reduction step. We find NO2 to be much more easily reduced to N2 on our catalysts, as long as there is a sufficient supply of reductant present. Unfortunately we typically find that a fraction of the NO2 is only partially reduced back to NO. Since much of the original hydrocarbon survives both the plasma and our catalyst, a subsequent stage of plasma will oxidize NO back to NO2 while at the same time replenishing the supply of partially oxidized hydrocarbon for another stage of heterogeneous catalysis. We present experimental evidence illustrating the advantages of multi-step discharge-catalyst treatment of NOx in simulated diesel exhaust.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Acid Sites in Ion-exchanged and Solid State-exchanged Zeolites

2001-09-24
2001-01-3571
Brønsted acidity of solution ion-exchanged and solid-state exchanged zeolites was compared for NaY, BaY, CaY, NaX, and CaX zeolites. These materials were chosen because they all exhibit catalytic activity in SCR of NOx in combination with a non-thermal plasma. Brønsted acidity was characterized qualitatively with retinol as an indicator dye. Our results show that the solid-state exchange using a chloride salt creates zeolites with lower acidity than zeolites obtained by conventional solution ion-exchange. NO2 adsorption was also found to create a significant quantity of acid sites at room temperature and a slight increase in acidity at 200°C. We speculate that the acid sites created by NO2 adsorption, because of their vicinity to metal cation sites in the zeolite, may lead to preferential reactions that lead to NOx reduction. BaY made by solution ion-exchange and BaY made by solid-state exchange using a chloride salt were tested for NOx reduction in a plasma-catalyst reactor system.
Technical Paper

Plasma-Facilitated SCR of NOx in Heavy-Duty Diesel Exhaust

2001-09-24
2001-01-3570
This paper describes two independent studies on γ-alumina as a plasma-activated catalyst. γ-alumina (2.5 - 4.3 wt%) was coated onto the surface of mesoporous silica to determine the importance of aluminum surface coordination on NOx conversion in conjunction with nonthermal plasma. Results indicate that the presence of 5- and 6- fold aluminum coordination sites in γ-alumina could be a significant factor in the NOx reduction process. A second study examined the effect of changing the reducing agent on NOx conversion. Several hydrocarbons were examined including propene, propane, isooctane, methanol, and acetaldehyde. It is demonstrated that methanol was the most effective reducing agent of those tested for a plasma-facilitated reaction over γ-alumina.
Technical Paper

Lean-NOx and Plasma Catalysis Over γ-Alumina for Heavy Duty Diesel Applications

2001-09-24
2001-01-3569
The NOx reduction performance under lean conditions over γ-alumina was evaluated using a micro-reactor system and a non-thermal plasma-equipped bench test system. Various alumina samples were obtained from alumina manufacturers to assess commercial alumina materials. In addition, γ-alumina samples were synthesized at Caterpillar with a sol-gel technique in order to control alumina properties. The deNOx performances of the alumina samples were compared. The alumina samples were characterized with analytical techniques such as inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and surface area measurements (BET) to understand physical and chemical properties. The information derived from these techniques was correlated with the NOx reduction performance to identify key parameters of γ-alumina for optimizing materials for lean-NOx and plasma assisted catalysis.
Technical Paper

Formability Investigation of Aluminum Extrusions under Hydroforming Conditions

2000-10-03
2000-01-2675
The transportation industry is finding an ever-increasing number of applications for products manufactured using the tubular hydroforming process. Most of the current hydroforming applications use steel tubes. However, with the mounting regulatory pressure to reduce vehicle emissions, aluminum alloys appear attractive as an alternative material to reduce vehicle weight. The introduction of aluminum alloys to tubular hydroforming requires knowledge of their forming limits. The current work investigates the forming limits of AA6061 in both the T4 and T6 tempers under laboratory conditions. These experimental results are compared to theoretical forming limit diagrams calculated via the M-K method. Free hydroforming results and forming limit diagrams are also compared to components produced under commercial hydroforming conditions.
Technical Paper

Formability and Fatigue of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks

2000-10-03
2000-01-2664
Tailor welded blanks are finding increasing application in automotive structures as a powerful method to reduce weight through material minimization. As consumer demand and regulatory pressure direct the automotive industry toward improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions, aluminum alloys are also becoming an attractive automotive structural material with their potential ability to reduce vehicle weight. The combination of aluminum and tailor welded blanks thus appears attractive as a method to further minimize vehicle weight. Two major concerns regarding the application of aluminum tailor welded blanks are the formability and durability of the weld materials. The current work experimentally and numerically investigates aluminum tailor welded blanks ductility, and experimentally investigates their fatigue resistance.
Technical Paper

Development of a Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor Electrical Model for Optimum NOx Removal Performance

2000-10-16
2000-01-2893
A double dielectric barrier discharge reactor driven by an alternating voltage is a relatively simple approach to promote oxidation of NO to NO2 for subsequent reduction in a catalyst bed. The chemical performance of such a non-thermal plasma reactor is determined by its current and electric field behavior in the gap, and by the fraction of the current carried by electrons, because the key reactants which initiate the NO oxidation and accompanying chemical changes are produced there, mostly by electron impact. We have tried to determine by models and experiments the bounds on performance of double dielectric barrier reactors and guidelines for optimization. Models reported here predict chemical results from time-resolved applied voltage and series sense capacitor data.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Plasma-Catalyst and Lean NOx Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction

2000-10-16
2000-01-2895
Projected NOx and fuel costs are compared for a plasma-catalyst system and an active lean NOx catalyst system. Comparisons are based on modeling of FTP cycle performance. The model uses steady state laboratory device characteristics, combined with measured vehicle exhaust data to predict NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalties. The plasma system uses a proprietary catalyst downstream of a plasma discharge. The active lean NOx catalyst uses a catalyst along with addition of hydrocarbons to the exhaust. For the plasma catalyst system, NOx conversion is available over a wide temperature range. Increased electrical power improves conversion but degrades vehicle fuel economy; 10 J/L energy deposition costs roughly 3% fuel economy. Improved efficiency is also available with larger catalyst size or increased exhaust hydrocarbon content. For the active lean NOx system, NOx conversion is available only in a narrow temperature range.
Technical Paper

Lean NOx Reduction in Two Stages: Non-thermal Plasma Followed by Heterogeneous Catalysis

2000-10-16
2000-01-2896
We present data in this paper showing that non-thermal plasma in combination with heterogeneous catalysis is a promising technique for the treatment of NOx in diesel exhaust. Using a commonly available zeolite catalyst, sodium Y, to treat synthetic diesel exhaust we report approximately 50% chemical reduction of NOx over a broad, representative temperature range. We have measured the overall efficiency as a function of the temperature and hydrocarbon concentration. The direct detection of N2 and N2O when the background gas is replaced by helium confirms that true chemical reduction is occurring.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Corona Reactors of Several Geometries for a Plasma Assisted Nitrogen Oxide Emission Reduction Device

2000-10-16
2000-01-2899
Proposed vehicle emissions regulations for the near future have prompted automotive manufactures and component suppliers to focus heavily on developing more efficient exhaust aftertreatment devices to lower emissions from spark and compression ignition engines. One of the primary pollutants from lean-burn engines, especially from diesels, are oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Current three-way catalytic converters will not have adequate performance to meet future emission reduction requirements. Therefore, there is a need for researchers and engineers to develop efficient exhaust aftertreatment devices that will reduce NOx emissions from lean-burn engines. These devices must have very high conversion of NOx gases, be unaffected by exhaust-gas impurity such as sulfur, and have minimal impact on vehicle operations and fuel economy. An effective technology for NOx control that is currently receiving a lot of attention is a non-thermal plasma system.
Technical Paper

Application of Non-Thermal Plasma Assisted Catalyst Technology for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction

2000-08-21
2000-01-3088
With new legislation and federal regulation for vehicle emission levels, automotive and truck manufacturers have been prompted to focus on emission control technologies that limit the level of exhaust pollutants. One of the primary pollutants, especially from diesel engines, is oxides of nitrogen (NOx). One possible solution to this pollution challenge is to design a more efficient internal combustion engine, which would require better engine operating parameter controls. However, there are limitations associated with such tight engine management. This need has led researchers and engineers to focus on the development of exhaust aftertreatment devices that will reduce NOx emissions with current diesel engines. An optimum aftertreatment device must be unaffected by exhaust-gas impurity poisoning such as sulfur products, and must have minimal impact on vehicle operations and fuel economy.
Technical Paper

Effects of Manufacturing Processes and In-Service mperature Variations on the Properties of TRIP Steels

2007-04-16
2007-01-0793
This paper examines some key aspects of the manufacturing process that “ Transformation Induced Plasticity” (TRIP) steels would be exposed to, and systematically evaluate how the forming and thermal histories affect final strength and ductility of the material. We evaluate the effects of in-service temperature variations, such as under hood and hot/cold cyclic conditions, to determine whether these conditions influence final strength, ductility and energy absorption characteristics of several available TRIP steel grades. As part of the manufacturing thermal environment evaluations, stamping process thermal histories are included in the studies. As part of the in-service conditions, different pre-straining levels are included. Materials from four steel suppliers are examined. The thermal/straining history versus material property relationship is established over a full range of expected thermal histories and selected loading modes.
Technical Paper

Failure Predictions for Aluminum Tube Hydroforming Processes

2006-04-03
2006-01-0543
Two analytical tools for failure predictions in free-expansion tube hydroforming, namely “Process Window Diagram” (PWD) and forming limit curve (FLC), are discussed in this paper. The PWD represents the incipient failure conditions of buckling, wrinkling and bursting of free-expansion tube hydroforming processes in the plane of process parameters, e.g. internal pressure versus axial compression. The PWD is a useful tool for design engineers to quickly assess part producibility and process design for tube hydroforming. An attempt is also made to draw the differences between FLCs for sheet and tube so that the appropriate FLC could be used to estimate the bursting or fracture limits in free-expansion tube hydroforming processes.
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