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Technical Paper

An Investigation on the Effects of Fuel Chemistry and Engine Operating Conditions on HCCI Engine

2008-06-23
2008-01-1660
A HCCI engine has been run at different operating boundaries conditions with fuels of different RON and MON and different chemistries. The fuels include gasoline, PRF and the mixture of PRF and ethanol. Six operating boundaries conditions are considered, including different intake temperature (Tin), intake pressure (Pin) and engine speed. The experimental results show that, fuel chemistries have different effect on the combustion process at different operating conditions. It is found that CA50 (crank angle at 50% completion of heat release) shows no correlation with either RON or MON at some operating boundaries conditions, but correlates well with the Octane Index (OI) at all conditions. The higher the OI, the more the resistance to auto-ignition and the later is the heat release in the HCCI engine. The operating range is also correlation with the OI. The higher the OI, the higher IMEP can reach.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Boost Pressure and Fuel Chemistry on Combustion and Performance of a HCCI Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-0051
The influence of boost pressure (Pin) and fuel chemistry on combustion characteristics and performance of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine was experimentally investigated. The tests were carried out in a modified four-cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Four fuels were used during the experiments: 90-octane, 93-octane and 97-octane primary reference fuel (PRF) blend and a commercial gasoline. The boost pressure conditions were set to give 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2MPa of absolute pressure. The results indicate that, with the increase of boost pressure, the start of combustion (SOC) advances, and the cylinder pressure increases. The effects of PRF octane number on SOC are weakened as the boost pressure increased. But the difference of SOC between gasoline and PRF is enlarged with the increase of boost pressure. The successful HCCI operating range is extended to the upper and lower load as the boost pressure increased.
Technical Paper

Effect of EGR on HCCI Combustion fuelled with Dimethyl Ether (DME) and Methanol Dual-Fuels

2005-10-24
2005-01-3730
The effects of cooled EGR on combustion and emission characteristics in HCCI operation region was investigated on a single-cylinder diesel engine, which is fitted with port injection of DME and methanol. The results indicate that EGR rate can enlarge controlled HCCI operating region, but it has little effect on the maximum load of HCCI engine fuelled with DME/methanol dual-fuels. With the increase of EGR rate, the main combustion ignition timing (MCIT) delays, the main combustion duration (MCD) prolongs, and the peak cylinder pressure and the peak rate of heat release decreases. Compared with EGR, DME percentage has an opposite effect on HCCI combustion characteristics. The increase of indicated thermal efficiency is a combined effect of EGR rate and DME percentage. Both HC and CO emissions ascend with EGR rate increasing, and decrease with DME percentage increasing. In normal combustion, NOX emissions are near zero.
Technical Paper

The Effect of PRF Fuel Octane Number on HCCI Operation

2004-10-25
2004-01-2992
By mixing iso-octane with octane number 100 and normal heptane with octane number 0, it was possible to obtain a PRF fuel with octane rating between 0 and 100. The influence of PRF fuel’s octane number on the combustion characteristics, performance and emissions character of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine was investigated. The experiments were carried out in a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. The test results show that, with the increase of the octane number, the ignition timing delayed, the combustion rate decreased, and the cylinder pressure decreased. The HCCI combustion can be controlled and then extending the HCCI operating range by burning different octane number fuel at different engine mode, which engine burns low octane number fuel at low load mode and large octane number fuel at large load mode. There exists an optimum octane number that achieves the highest indicated thermal efficiency at different engine load.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study on the Effects of EGR and Octane Number of PRF Fuel on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of HCCI Engines

2005-04-11
2005-01-0174
The effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) and octane number of PRF fuel on combustion and emission characteristics in HCCI operation were investigated. The results show that EGR could delay the ignition timing, slow down the combustion reaction rate, reduce the pressure and average temperature in cylinder and extend the operation region into large load mode. With the increase of the fuel/air equivalence ratio or the fuel octane number (ON), the effect of EGR on combustion efficiency improves. With the increase of EGR rate, the combustion efficiency decreases. The optimum indicated thermal efficiency of different octane number fuels appears in the region of high EGR rate and large fuel/air equivalence ratio, which is next to the boundary of knocking. In the region of high EGR rate, HC emissions rise up sharply as the EGR rate increases. With the increase of octane number, this tendency becomes more obvious.
Technical Paper

Effects of Fuel Physical and Chemical Properties on Combustion and Emissions on Both Metal and Optical Diesel Engines and on a Partially Premixed Burner

2015-09-01
2015-01-1918
Effects of fuel physical and chemical properties on combustion and emissions were investigated on both metal and optical diesel engines. The new generation oxygenated biofuels, n-butanol and DMF (2,5-dimethylfuran) were blended into diesel fuel with 20% volume fraction and termed as Butanol20 and DMF20 respectively. The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates were varied from zero to ∼60% covering both conventional and low temperature combustion. Meanwhile, the reference fuels such as n-heptane, cetane, and iso-cetane were also used to isolate the effects of different fuel properties on combustion and emissions. In addition, to clarify the effects of oxygenated structures on combustion and emissions, a fundamental partially premixed burner was also used. Results based on metal and optical diesel engines show that fuel cetane number is the dominated factor to affect the auto-ignition timing and subsequent combustion process.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study on the Combustion Process of Dimethyl Ether (DME)

2003-10-27
2003-01-3194
Studies on combustion process of Dimethyl Ether (DME) were carried out on a constant volume combustion bomb (CVCB) and a visualization engine, and the photograph of combustion of DME was taken by high speed digital CCD. The results show that the ignition delay of DME is shorter than that of diesel fuel. When the fuel delivery amounts of DME and diesel in volume are the same, the combustion duration of DME is shorter than that of diesel fuel, and the flame temperature of DME is lower than that of diesel. At the end of combustion, the second injection occurred. The results of high-speed photograph in visualization engine show that, as soon as DME leaves the nozzle, it evaporates rapidly, and under the effect of air swirl, the spray“core” is blown off. Compared to diesel, the penetration of DME is shorter, and the wall combustion of DME is apparently smaller.
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