Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Video

Future Development of EcoBoost Technology

2012-05-10
Ford's EcoBoost GTDI engine technology (Gasoline Direct Injection, Turbo-charging and Downsizing) is being successfully implemented in the market place with the EcoBoost option accounting for significant volumes in vehicle lines as diverse as the F150 pickup truck, Edge CUV and the Lincoln MKS luxury sedan. A logical question would be what comes after GTDI? This presentation will review some of the technologies that will be required for further improvements in CO2, efficiency and performance building on the EcoBoost foundation as well as some of the challenges inherent in the new technologies and approaches. Presenter Eric W. Curtis, Ford Motor Co.
Technical Paper

Gear Whine Improvements for an Automatic Transmission through Design Retargeting and Manufacturing Variability Reduction

2001-04-30
2001-01-1505
Gear whine in 1st gear for an automatic transmission that has been in production for nearly thirty years was identified as an NVH issue. Due to advances in vehicle level refinement, and reduction of other masking noises, the automatic transmission gear whine became an issue with the customer. Since the transmission was already in production, the improvements had to be within the boundaries of manufacturing feasibility with existing equipment to avoid costly and time consuming investment in new machines. The approach used was one of identifying optimum values of existing gear parameters to provide a reduction in passenger compartment noise. The problem was in a light truck application. Objective noise measurements were recorded for 10 transmissions from more than 50 driven in vehicles. The transmissions were disassembled and the gears inspected.
Technical Paper

Laminate Dash Ford Taurus Noise and Vibration Performance

2001-04-30
2001-01-1535
Mastic material, constrained or non-constrained with doublers, is the traditional method in adding vibrational damping to a steel structure with the goal of reducing panel vibration and radiated sound. With the use of laminated vibration damped steel (LVDS), Ford has been able to reduce the dash panel vibration and optimize sound package design for powertrain noise attenuation. These NVH benefits are presented as the result of a study completed with a laminated dash on a Ford Taurus.
Technical Paper

Frictional and Acoustic Behavior of Automotive Interior Polymeric Material Pairs Under Environmental Conditions

2001-04-30
2001-01-1550
As automotive manufacturers continue to increase their use of thermoplastics for interior and exterior components, there is a likelihood of squeaks due to material contacts. To address this issue, Ford's Body Chassis NVH Squeak and Rattle Prevention Engineering Department has developed a tester that can measure friction, and any accompanying audible sound, as a function of sliding velocity, normal load, surface roughness, and environmental factors. The Ford team has been using the tester to address manufacturing plant issues and to develop a database of polymeric material pairings that will be used as a guide for current and future designs to eliminate potential noise concerns. Based upon the database, along with a physical property analysis of the various plastic (viscoelastic) materials used in the interior, we are in the process of developing an analytical model which will be a tool to predict frictional behavior.
Technical Paper

Analytical and Experimental Techniques in Solving the Plastic Intake Manifold NVH

2001-04-30
2001-01-1544
The intent of this paper is to summarize the work of the V8 power plant intake manifold radiated noise study. In a particular V8 engine application, customer satisfaction feedback provided observations of existing unpleasant noise at the driver's ear. A comprehensive analysis of customer data indicated that a range from 500 to 800 Hz suggests a potential improvement in noise reduction at the driver's ear. In this study the noise source was determined using various accelerometers located throughout the valley of the engine and intake manifold. The overall surface velocity of the engine valley was ranked with respect to the overall surface velocity of the intake manifold. An intensity mapping technique was also used to determine the major component noise contribution. In order to validate the experimental findings, a series of analysis was also conducted. The analysis model included not only the plastic intake manifold, but also the whole powertrain.
Technical Paper

Aluminum Rail Rivet and Steel Rail Weld DOE and CAE Studies for NVH

2001-04-30
2001-01-1608
Vehicle body with aluminum riveted construction instead of steel welded one will be a big challenge to NVH. In this paper, aluminum and steel rails with the dimensions similar to the rear rail portion of a typical mid-size sedan were fabricated. Rivets were used to assemble the aluminum rails while welds were used to assemble the steel rails. Adhesive, rivet/weld spacing, and rivet/weld location were the three major factors to be studied and their impact on NVH were investigated. The DOE matrix was developed using these three major factors. Modal tests were performed on those rails according to the DOE matrix. The FEA models corresponding to the hardware were built. CAE modal analysis were performed and compared with test data. The current in-house CAE modeling techniques for spot weld and adhesive were evaluated and validated with test data.
Technical Paper

Engine Excitation Decomposition Methods and V Engine Results

2001-04-30
2001-01-1595
Engine excitation forces have been studied in the past using one of two methods; a lumped sum or a totally distributed approach. The lumped sum approach gives the well-understood engine inherent unbalance and the totally distributed approach is used in engine CAE models to determine the overall engine response. The approach that will be described in this paper identifies an intermediate level of sophistication. The methodology implemented considers single cylinder forces on the engine block, piston side thrust and main bearing forces, and decomposes them into their order content. The forces are then phased and geometrically distributed appropriately for each cylinder and then each order is analyzed relative to know distributions that are NVH concerns, V-block breathing, block side wall breathing, and block lateral and vertical bending.
Technical Paper

Sound Package Design for a Convertible by Statistical Energy Analysis

2001-04-30
2001-01-1623
The application of SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) to the sound package design for a convertible is presented. SEA modeling was used optimize the soft-top construction and the acoustic insulation in the top-stack area (where the soft-top is stored) which were shown to be important transmission paths for tire noise. Correlation between measurement data and predictions from the SEA model is presented and good agreement shown. It is concluded that SEA can be applied to determine the special sound package requirements for convertible vehicles.
Technical Paper

Finite element simulation of drive shaft in truck/SUV frontal crash

2001-06-04
2001-06-0106
Drive shaft modelling effects frontal crash finite element simulation. A 35 mph rigid barrier impact of a body on frame SUV with an one piece drive shaft and a unibody SUV with a two piece drive shaft have been studied and simulated using finite element analyses. In the model, the drive shaft can take significant load in frontal impact crash. Assumptions regarding the drive shaft model can change the predicted engine motion in the simulation. This change influences the rocker @ B-pillar deceleration. Two modelling methods have been investigated in this study considering both joint mechanisms and material failure in dynamic impact. Model parameters for joint behavior and failure should be determined from vehicle design information and component testing. A body on frame SUV FEA model has been used to validate the drive shaft modeling technique by comparing the simulation results with crash test data.
Technical Paper

Fuel Economy Benefit of Cylinder Deactivation - Sensitivity to Vehicle Application and Operating Constraints

2001-09-24
2001-01-3591
A Variable Displacement Engine (VDE) improves fuel economy by deactivating half the cylinders at light load. The actual fuel economy benefit attained in the vehicle depends on how often cylinders can be deactivated, which is a function of test cycle, engine size, and vehicle weight. In practice, cylinder deactivation will also be constrained by NVH (noise, vibration, and harshness). This paper presents fuel economy projections for VDE in several different engine and vehicle applications. Sensitivity to NVH considerations is quantified by calculating fuel economy with and without cylinder deactivation in various operating modes: idle, low engine speed, 1st and 2nd gear, and warm-up after cold start. The effects of lug limits and calibration hysteresis are also presented.
Technical Paper

An Ultra-Light Thin Sliding Door Design - A Multi-Product Multi-Material Solution

2002-03-04
2002-01-0391
Sliding door designs are applied to rear side doors on vans and other large vehicles with a trend towards dual sliding doors with power operation. It is beneficial for the vehicle user to reduce the weight of and space occupied by these doors. Alcoa, in conjunction with Ford, has developed a multi-product, multi-material-based solution, which significantly reduces the cost of an aluminum sliding door and provides both consumer delight and stamping-assembly plant benefits. The design was successfully demonstrated through a concept readiness/technology demonstration program.
Technical Paper

Ultra Thin Wall Substrates - Trends for Performance in FTP and US06 Tests

2002-03-04
2002-01-0356
This paper compares the emissions performance of four ultra thin wall ceramic substrates with standard wall thickness product on a chassis dynamometer for two different substrate volumes. This comparison helps establish performance trends and provides useful information for selection of substrates in designing catalytic converter systems. This experimental study tests and compares four ultra thin wall products (400/4, 600/3, 600/4, and 900/2) with a standard wall product (400/6.5) at two different substrate volumes. Engine bench aging is used to simulate typical aged conditions. Temperature data as well as second by second and bag emissions data for hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen were used to evaluate the relative performances of the substrates. The US FTP and US06 driving cycles were used as protocols for the comparison. Results suggest that lower bulk density and higher geometric surface area interact to lead to lower emissions.
Technical Paper

Permanent Mold Casting and Creep Behavior of Mg - 4 Al - 4 X: (Ca, Ce, La, Sr) Alloys

2007-04-16
2007-01-1027
Creep-resistant magnesium alloys for automotive powertrain applications offer significant potential for vehicle weight reduction. In this study permanent mold casting, microstructure and creep behavior have been investigated for a series of ternary magnesium alloys (Mg-4Al-4X (X: Ca, Ce, La, Sr) wt%) and AXJ530 (Mg-5Al-3Ca-0.15Sr, wt%). A permanent mold was instrumented with twelve thermocouples and mold temperature was monitored during the casting process. Average mold temperature increased from 200°C to 400°C during a typical alloy casting series (fifteen to twenty castings). The cast microstructure for all alloys consists of primary α-Mg globular phase surrounded by eutectic structure which is composed of intermetallic(s) and α-Mg magnesium phases. The primary cell size of the AXJ530 increased from 18 to 24 μm with increasing mold temperature and a similar trend is expected for all alloys.
Technical Paper

Examination of the Corrosion Behavior of Creep-Resistant Magnesium Alloys in an Aqueous Environment

2007-04-16
2007-01-1023
An electrochemical testing protocol for assessing the intrinsic corrosion-resistance of creep-resistant magnesium alloys in aqueous environments, and effects of passivating surface films anticipated to develop in the presence of engine coolants is under development. This work reports progress in assessing the relative corrosion resistance of the base metals (AMC-SC1, MRI-202S, MRI-230D, AM50 and 99.98% Mg) in a common test environment, based on a near-neutral pH buffered saline solution, found to yield particularly stable values for the open-circuit or corrosion potential. This approach was found to provide a platform for the eventual assessment of the durability of certain passivating layers expected to develop during exposure of the magnesium alloys to aqueous coolants.
Technical Paper

Hybrid Powertrain with an Engine-Disconnecting Clutch

2002-03-04
2002-01-0930
Several types of hybrid-electric vehicles have been developed at Ford Research Laboratory. Among the parallel hybrid systems with a single electric motor, two types were studied. In the first type, the electric motor was attached directly to the crankshaft (mild hybrid) [1], to enable the engine start-stop and regeneration functions. In the second type (full hybrid) the electric motor was connected to the engine through the use of a clutch to allow electric launch of the vehicle and pure electric driving at low speeds. The full hybrid powertrain described in this paper uses a more powerful electric motor for enhanced regenerative braking and engine power assist. An engine-disconnecting clutch saves energy during both the electric propulsion and during vehicle braking. When the clutch is disengaged the engine is shut-off, which eliminates the energy otherwise spent on motoring the engine during electric propulsion.
Technical Paper

Selective Reduction of NOx in Oxygen Rich Environments with Plasma-Assisted Catalysis: The Role of Plasma and Reactive Intermediates

2001-09-24
2001-01-3513
The catalytic activity of selected materials (BaY and NaY zeolites, and γ-alumina) for selective NOx reduction in combination with a non-thermal plasma was investigated. Our studies suggest that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, all materials that are active in plasma-assisted catalysis were found to be very effective for the thermal reduction of NOx in the presence of aldehydes. For example, the thermal catalytic activity of a BaY zeolite with aldehydes gives 80-90% NOx removal at 250°C with 200ppm NOx at the inlet and a VHSV=12,000 h-1. The hydrocarbon reductants, n-octane and 1-propyl alcohol, have also shown high thermal catalytic activity for NOx removal over BaY, NaY and γ-alumina.
Technical Paper

Products and Intermediates in Plasma-Catalyst Treatment of Simulated Diesel Exhaust

2001-09-24
2001-01-3512
A simulated diesel exhaust is treated with a nonthermal plasma discharge under steady state conditions. The plasma effluent is then passed through a sodium zeolite-Y (NaY) catalyst followed by a platinum oxidation catalyst. Detailed FTIR measurements of gas composition are taken before, between, and after the treatment stages. The plasma discharge causes oxidation of NO primarily to NO2, with methyl nitrate and nitric acid byproducts. At the same time, HC is partially oxidized, creating species such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, CO and other partial oxidation products. When this mixture passes over the NaY catalyst, part of the NOx is reduced to N2, with the remainder primarily in the form of NO. Methyl nitrate decomposes to form methanol and NOx, and nitric acid is consumed. There is little HC conversion on this catalyst. Small quantities of HCN and N2O are formed. When the mixture then passes over the platinum catalyst, further NOx conversion occurs.
Technical Paper

Laboratory Assessment of the Oxidation and Wear Performance Capabilities of Low Phosphorus Engine Oils

2001-09-24
2001-01-3541
Meeting upcoming stringent emission standards will require that exhaust gas catalyst systems become active very quickly, function at very high efficiencies and maintain those capabilities at high mileages. This means that contamination of the catalysts by engine oil derived poisons must be minimized. Phosphorus compounds, derived from the zinc dialkyldithio-phosphate (ZDTP) additives that provide antiwear and antioxidant activity, are a principal contaminant that can increase catalyst light off times and reduce catalyst efficiency. Therefore, reducing the concentration of, or eliminating, phosphorus in engine oils is desirable. Doing so, however, requires that oils be reformulated to ensure that wear protection will not be compromised and that oxidation stability will be maintained. To address these concerns, laboratory tests for evaluating oil oxidation and wear performance have been developed and used to evaluate developmental low phosphorus oils.
Technical Paper

Impact of Decarburization on the Fatigue Life of Powder Metal Forged Connecting Rods

2001-03-05
2001-01-0403
A main requirement for a satisfactory function and service life of a forged powder metal connecting rod is the fatigue strength. Fatigue strength mainly depends on design, material, microstructure, and surface condition. Much work has been accomplished to optimize these factors, but still a variety of surface defects such as localized porosity, roughness, oxide penetration, decarburization, etc., can be developed during manufacturing. These surface defects impact the fatigue strength in various ways. The impact of the decarburized layer depth on the fatigue life of a forged powder metal connecting rod is the focus of this work. Several connecting rods were submitted to a Weibull test at the same loading pattern. After the fatigue tests, the connecting rods were divided into groups with different decarburized layer depths. Both Maximum Likelihood Estimates (MLE) and Rank Regression (RR) techniques were used to analyze test results from all the groups obtained.
Technical Paper

Applications of High Strength Steels in Hydroforming Dual Phase Vs. HSLA

2001-03-05
2001-01-1133
Dual Phase (DP) high strength steel is widely used in Europe and Japan for automotive component applications, and has recently drawn greater attention in the North American automotive industry for improving crash performance and reducing weight. In comparison with high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel grades with similar initial yield strength, DP steel has the following advantages: higher strain hardening, higher energy absorption, higher fatigue strength, higher bake hardenablility, and no yield point elongation. This paper compares the performance of DP and HSLA steel grades before, during, and after hydroforming. Computer simulation results show that DP steel demonstrates more uniform material flow during hydroforming, better crash performance and less wrinkling tendency.
X