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Future Development of EcoBoost Technology

2012-05-10
Ford's EcoBoost GTDI engine technology (Gasoline Direct Injection, Turbo-charging and Downsizing) is being successfully implemented in the market place with the EcoBoost option accounting for significant volumes in vehicle lines as diverse as the F150 pickup truck, Edge CUV and the Lincoln MKS luxury sedan. A logical question would be what comes after GTDI? This presentation will review some of the technologies that will be required for further improvements in CO2, efficiency and performance building on the EcoBoost foundation as well as some of the challenges inherent in the new technologies and approaches. Presenter Eric W. Curtis, Ford Motor Co.
Technical Paper

Gear Whine Improvements for an Automatic Transmission through Design Retargeting and Manufacturing Variability Reduction

2001-04-30
2001-01-1505
Gear whine in 1st gear for an automatic transmission that has been in production for nearly thirty years was identified as an NVH issue. Due to advances in vehicle level refinement, and reduction of other masking noises, the automatic transmission gear whine became an issue with the customer. Since the transmission was already in production, the improvements had to be within the boundaries of manufacturing feasibility with existing equipment to avoid costly and time consuming investment in new machines. The approach used was one of identifying optimum values of existing gear parameters to provide a reduction in passenger compartment noise. The problem was in a light truck application. Objective noise measurements were recorded for 10 transmissions from more than 50 driven in vehicles. The transmissions were disassembled and the gears inspected.
Technical Paper

Dimethoxy Methane in Diesel Fuel: Part 3. The Effect of Pilot Injection, Fuels and Engine Operating Modes on Emissions of Toxic Air Pollutants and Gas/Solid Phase PAH

2001-09-24
2001-01-3630
The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of pilot fuel injection on engine-out emissions of potentially toxic compounds from a modern diesel engine operated with different fuels including 15% v/v dimethoxy methane in a low-sulfur diesel fuel. Five diesel fuels were examined: a low-sulfur (∼1 ppm), low aromatic, hydrocracked fuel, the same low-sulfur fuel containing 15% v/v dimethoxy methane, a Fischer-Tropsch fuel, a California reformulated fuel, and a EPA number 2 certification fuel. A DaimlerChrysler OM611 CIDI engine was controlled with a SwRI Rapid Prototyping Electronic Control system. The pilot fuel injection was either turned off or turned on with engine control by either Location of Peak Pressure (LPP) of combustion or the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) calibration strategy. These three control strategies were compared over 2 speed-load modes run in triplicate. Thirty-three potentially toxic compounds were measured.
Technical Paper

An Ultra-Light Thin Sliding Door Design - A Multi-Product Multi-Material Solution

2002-03-04
2002-01-0391
Sliding door designs are applied to rear side doors on vans and other large vehicles with a trend towards dual sliding doors with power operation. It is beneficial for the vehicle user to reduce the weight of and space occupied by these doors. Alcoa, in conjunction with Ford, has developed a multi-product, multi-material-based solution, which significantly reduces the cost of an aluminum sliding door and provides both consumer delight and stamping-assembly plant benefits. The design was successfully demonstrated through a concept readiness/technology demonstration program.
Technical Paper

Ford P2000 Hydrogen Engine Dynamometer Development

2002-03-04
2002-01-0242
As part of the P2000 hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicle program, an engine dynamometer research project was conducted in order to systematically investigate the unique hydrogen related combustion characteristics cited in the literature. These characteristics include pre-ignition, NOx emissions formation and control, volumetric efficiency of gaseous fuel injection and related power density, thermal efficiency, and combustion control. To undertake this study, several dedicated, hydrogen-fueled spark ignition engines (compression ratios: 10, 12.5, 14.5 and 15.3:1) were designed and built. Engine dynamometer development testing was conducted at the Ford Research Laboratory and the University of California at Riverside. This engine dynamometer work also provided the mapping data and control strategy needed to develop the engine in the P2000 vehicle.
Technical Paper

Selective Reduction of NOx in Oxygen Rich Environments with Plasma-Assisted Catalysis: The Role of Plasma and Reactive Intermediates

2001-09-24
2001-01-3513
The catalytic activity of selected materials (BaY and NaY zeolites, and γ-alumina) for selective NOx reduction in combination with a non-thermal plasma was investigated. Our studies suggest that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, all materials that are active in plasma-assisted catalysis were found to be very effective for the thermal reduction of NOx in the presence of aldehydes. For example, the thermal catalytic activity of a BaY zeolite with aldehydes gives 80-90% NOx removal at 250°C with 200ppm NOx at the inlet and a VHSV=12,000 h-1. The hydrocarbon reductants, n-octane and 1-propyl alcohol, have also shown high thermal catalytic activity for NOx removal over BaY, NaY and γ-alumina.
Technical Paper

Products and Intermediates in Plasma-Catalyst Treatment of Simulated Diesel Exhaust

2001-09-24
2001-01-3512
A simulated diesel exhaust is treated with a nonthermal plasma discharge under steady state conditions. The plasma effluent is then passed through a sodium zeolite-Y (NaY) catalyst followed by a platinum oxidation catalyst. Detailed FTIR measurements of gas composition are taken before, between, and after the treatment stages. The plasma discharge causes oxidation of NO primarily to NO2, with methyl nitrate and nitric acid byproducts. At the same time, HC is partially oxidized, creating species such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, CO and other partial oxidation products. When this mixture passes over the NaY catalyst, part of the NOx is reduced to N2, with the remainder primarily in the form of NO. Methyl nitrate decomposes to form methanol and NOx, and nitric acid is consumed. There is little HC conversion on this catalyst. Small quantities of HCN and N2O are formed. When the mixture then passes over the platinum catalyst, further NOx conversion occurs.
Technical Paper

Cascade Processing of NOx by Two-Step Discharge/Catalyst Reactors

2001-09-24
2001-01-3509
We present here a phenomenological analysis of a cascade of two-step discharge-catalyst reactors. That is, each step of the cascade consists of a discharge reactor in series with a catalyst bed. These reactors are intended for use in the reduction of tailpipe emission of NOx from diesel engines. The discharge oxidizes NO to NO2, and partially oxidizes HC. The NO2 then reacts on the catalyst bed with hydrocarbons and partially oxidized HCs and is reduced to N2. The cascade may be essential because the best catalysts for this purpose that we have also convert significant fractions of the NO2 back to NO. As we show, reprocessing the gas may not only be necessary, but may also result in energy savings and increased device reliability.
Technical Paper

Laboratory Assessment of the Oxidation and Wear Performance Capabilities of Low Phosphorus Engine Oils

2001-09-24
2001-01-3541
Meeting upcoming stringent emission standards will require that exhaust gas catalyst systems become active very quickly, function at very high efficiencies and maintain those capabilities at high mileages. This means that contamination of the catalysts by engine oil derived poisons must be minimized. Phosphorus compounds, derived from the zinc dialkyldithio-phosphate (ZDTP) additives that provide antiwear and antioxidant activity, are a principal contaminant that can increase catalyst light off times and reduce catalyst efficiency. Therefore, reducing the concentration of, or eliminating, phosphorus in engine oils is desirable. Doing so, however, requires that oils be reformulated to ensure that wear protection will not be compromised and that oxidation stability will be maintained. To address these concerns, laboratory tests for evaluating oil oxidation and wear performance have been developed and used to evaluate developmental low phosphorus oils.
Technical Paper

Development of a Desulfurization Strategy for a NOx Adsorber Catalyst System

2001-03-05
2001-01-0510
The aggressive reduction of future diesel engine NOx emission limits forces the heavy- and light-duty diesel engine manufacturers to develop means to comply with stringent legislation. As a result, different exhaust emission control technologies applicable to NOx have been the subject of many investigations. One of these systems is the NOx adsorber catalyst, which has shown high NOx conversion rates during previous investigations with acceptable fuel consumption penalties. In addition, the NOx adsorber catalyst does not require a secondary on-board reductant. However, the NOx adsorber catalyst also represents the most sulfur sensitive emissions control device currently under investigation for advanced NOx control. To remove the sulfur introduced into the system through the diesel fuel and stored on the catalyst sites during operation, specific regeneration strategies and boundary conditions were investigated and developed.
Technical Paper

A Rational Approach to Qualifying Materials for Use in Fuel Systems

2000-06-19
2000-01-2013
About 10 years ago in the US, an automotive OEM consortium formed the Oxygenated Fuels Task Force which in turn created the SAE Cooperative Research Project Group 2 to develop a simple rational method for qualifying materials. At that time the focus was Methanol/Gasoline blends. This work resulted in SAE J1681, Gasoline/Methanol Mixtures for Materials Testing. Recently this document was rewritten to make it the single, worldwide, generic source for fuel system test fluids. The paper will describe the rationale for selecting the fuel surrogate fluids and why this new SAE standard should replace all existing test fuel or test fluid standards for fuel system materials testing.
Technical Paper

Design of an Integral Perforated Manifold, Muffler, and Catalyst

2001-03-05
2001-01-0222
The development of an integrated Perforated Manifold, Muffler, and Catalyst (PMMC) for an automotive engine exhaust system is described. The design aims to reduce tailpipe emissions and improve engine power while maintaining low sound output levels from the exhaust. The initial design, based on simplified acoustic and fluid dynamic considerations, is further refined through the use of a computational approach and bench tests. A final prototype is fabricated and evaluated using fired engine dynamometer experiments. The results confirm earlier analytical estimates for improved engine power and reductions of emissions and noise levels.
Technical Paper

Robustness Plan for Flex Fuel Vehicles

2004-11-16
2004-01-3301
This paper describes the steps utilized in the development of the Flex Fuel program by the Ford South America Product Development team to implement a reliability plan. A reliability plan, understood as series of tools to avoid failure mode occurrence, is particularly important when introducing a new technology. Robustness, as the ability of a system to perform its intended function in the presence of variable operational conditions, is contained in the reliability concept and is a key aspect of this plan. Several factors that could affect the vehicle performance were listed, classified and prioritized in order to establish a preventive action plan. The tools were used first at the vehicle level, and then cascaded down to subsystem and component level. Also, with the results of this analysis, design verification methods were enhanced to capture real world usage conditions.
Technical Paper

Optimum Gap Design And Durability Analysis of Catalytic Converter Assembly

2001-03-05
2001-01-0942
A method to predict gap distribution, can deformation and mounting force of catalytic converter during assembling and operation cycles has been developed using ABAQUS contact algorithm with user subroutine for material properties. Inherent in the methodology is the constitutive model for both vermiculite mat and wire mesh mounting materials, which is able to describe their nonlinear and thermal behaviors and shows good agreement with test results. A design optimization procedure is presented to achieve uniform gap design of can and substrate. The technology will enable engineers to generate robust converter can designs, substrate shape and stamping tools for minimum manufacturing failure rate and maximum durability performance once a mounting material is selected.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effect of Substrate Cell Shape on Conversion in Monolith Catalysts

2001-03-05
2001-01-0932
Mass transfer limitations from the bulk gas phase to the surface of the catalyst as well as mass transfer limitations within the washcoat itself have important effects on conversion in washcoated monolith catalysts. These factors depend upon the shape of the channel as well as the loading of washcoat material. This paper outlines a method to describe the washcoat distribution profile for different channel shapes and washcoat loadings. This allows for prediction of effectiveness factors and bulk mass transfer coefficients as a function of cell geometry and washcoat loading for the oxidation of propane. It was found that differences in the diffusion limitations within the washcoat control conversion in the catalyst more than differences in bulk mass transfer rates when comparing different cell shapes. The results show that optimum washcoat loadings exist for the geometry of each cell, and that these optimum loadings are a function of catalyst temperature.
Technical Paper

Estimating Real Time Diurnal Permeation from Constant Temperature Measurements

2001-03-05
2001-01-0730
Using the results of Constant Temperature (CT) Permeation Measurements to estimate Real Time Diurnal (RTD) permeation emissions has a number of practical advantages. In particular, Constant Temperature measurements are easier to set up and control in a laboratory environment, and Constant Temperature measurements provide for data checks using simple self-consistency tests that are not possible with Real Time Diurnal measurements. Furthermore, there is no need to repeat permeation measurements for each separate real-time temperature profile of interest. The same two Constant Temperature measurements can be used to estimate permeation performance for many different temperature cycles - for example, the temperature cycles prescribed by CARB, EPA, and EEC, or the different temperature profiles experienced by separate fuel system components during a vehicle SHED test.
Technical Paper

Correlating Stressed Environmental Testing of Structural Composites to Service

2001-03-05
2001-01-0094
A compact in-situ tensile stress fixture was designed for the study of the combined effects of stress and automotive environments on structural glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. With this fixture, a standardized 300 hour laboratory screening test was developed to compare the residual property loss of composite materials due to concurrent exposure to stress and environment. It is of great importance that the data gathered in the laboratory have correlation to on-vehicle (in-service) performance, and that both lab and real world data be taken with a test system (in-situ test fixtures) capable of providing accurate and consistent results under either test condition.
Technical Paper

The Impact of Engine Design Constraints on Diesel Combustion System Size Scaling

2010-04-12
2010-01-0180
A set of scaling laws were previously developed to guide the transfer of combustion system designs between diesel engines of different sizes [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ]. The intent of these scaling laws was to maintain geometric similarity of key parameters influencing diesel combustion such as in-cylinder spray penetration and flame lift-off length. The current study explores the impact of design constraints or limitations on the application of the scaling laws and the effect this has on the ability to replicate combustion and emissions. Multi dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were used to evaluate the relative impact of engine design parameters on engine performance under full load operating conditions. The base engine was first scaled using the scaling laws. Design constraints were then applied to assess how such constraints deviate from the established scaling laws and how these alter the effectiveness of the scaling effort.
Technical Paper

Ford 2011 6.7L Power Stroke® Diesel Engine Combustion System Development

2011-04-12
2011-01-0415
A new diesel engine, called the 6.7L Power Stroke® V-8 Turbo Diesel, and code named "Scorpion," was designed and developed by Ford Motor Company for the full-size pickup truck and light commercial vehicle markets. The combustion system includes the piston bowl, swirl level, number of nozzle holes, fuel spray angle, nozzle tip protrusion, nozzle hydraulic flow, and nozzle-hole taper. While all of these parameters could be explored through extensive hardware testing, 3-D CFD studies were utilized to quickly screen two bowl concepts and assess their sensitivities to a few of the other parameters. The two most promising bowl concepts were built into single-cylinder engines for optimization of the rest of the combustion system parameters. 1-D CFD models were used to set boundary conditions at intake valve closure for 3-D CFD which was used for the closed-cycle portion of the simulation.
Technical Paper

Ford GT Body Engineering - Delivering the Designer's Vision in 24 Months

2004-03-08
2004-01-1253
The objective was to engineer a world-class supercar body that faithfully reproduces the 2002 Concept and pays homage to the 1960's road racer. The car had to be designed, developed and launched in 24 months, while meeting tough requirements for function, weight, occupant package and aerodynamics. Challenging features such as the cantilevered door, “clamshell” engine decklid and a deeply contoured hood were to be included. This paper will discuss how a dedicated team of enthusiasts can have a flexible approach to the engineering process, material selections and manufacturing processes to achieve the designer's vision in 24 months (Figure 1).
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