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Technical Paper

Variability of Head Injury Criteria with the Hybrid III Dummy

1996-02-01
960094
Drop testing of the Hybrid III dummy head was conducted to determine variations in Head Injury Criteria values with the point of head impact, and how the variations relate to actual head injuries. Head drop tests indicated that impacts to the temple and lower forehead posed the greatest injury risks. Moreover, the application of chamois or chalk over the head, a common practice among safety researchers to detect racial lacerations and head contacts, was found to significantly lower Head Injury Criteria values for all impact locations.
Technical Paper

Comprehensive Computational Rollover Sensitivity Study Part 2: Influence of Vehicle, Crash, and Occupant Parameters on Head, Neck, and Thorax Response

2011-04-12
2011-01-1115
Fatalities resulting from vehicle rollover events account for over one-third of all U.S. motor vehicle occupant fatalities. While a great deal of research has been directed towards the rollover problem, few studies have attempted to determine the sensitivity of occupant injury risk to variations in the vehicle (roof strength), crash (kinematic conditions at roof-to-ground contact), and occupant (anthropometry, position and posture) parameters that define the conditions of the crash. A two-part computational study was developed to examine the sensitivity of injury risk to changes in these parameters. The first part of this study, the Crash Parameter Sensitivity Study (CPSS), demonstrated the influence of parameters describing the vehicle and the crash on vehicle response using LS-DYNA finite element (FE) simulations.
Technical Paper

Neck Validation of Multibody Human Model under Frontal and Lateral Impacts using an Optimization Technique

2015-04-14
2015-01-1469
Multibody human models are widely used to investigate responses of human during an automotive crash. This study aimed to validate a commercially available multibody human body model against response corridors from volunteer tests conducted by Naval BioDynamics Laboratory (NBDL). The neck model consisted of seven vertebral bodies, and two adjacent bodies were connected by three orthogonal linear springs and dampers and three orthogonal rotational springs and dampers. The stiffness and damping characteristics were scaled up or down to improve the biofidelity of the neck model against NBDL volunteer test data because those characteristics were encrypted due to confidentiality. First, sensitivity analysis was performed to find influential scaling factors among the entire set using a design of experiment.
Technical Paper

The Causes of Head Injury in Vehicle-Pedestrian Impacts: Comparing the Relative Danger of Vehicle and Road Surface

2006-04-03
2006-01-0462
This research uses simulations of vehicle-pedestrian collisions to determine if the risk of pedestrian head injury is greater from impact with the vehicle or from impact with the ground, and to determine the influence of vehicle speed, vehicle type, and pedestrian stance on the injury risk. Five speeds, two vehicle types and four pedestrian stances are examined. In addition, a smaller set of simulations is included to determine the influence of body orientation just prior to ground impact. As anticipated, risk of head injury from both the vehicle and the ground tends to increase with vehicle speed, but injury risk from the ground is less predictable. At lower speeds, the vehicle tends to pose a greater risk of injury than does the ground, while at higher speeds the probability of injury from both the vehicle and ground is typically very large.
Technical Paper

A Comparative Evaluation of Pedestrian Kinematics and Injury Prediction for Adults and Children upon Impact with a Passenger Car

2004-03-08
2004-01-1606
Studies show that the pedestrian population at high risk of injury consists of both young children and adults. The goal of this study is to gain understanding in the mechanisms that lead to injuries for children and adults. Multi-body pedestrian human models of two specific anthropometries, a 6year-old child and a 50th percentile adult male, are applied. A vehicle model is developed that consists of a detailed rigid finite element mesh, validated stiffness regions, stiff structures underlying the hood and a suspension model. Simulations are performed in a test matrix where anthropometry, impact speed and impact location are variables. Bumper impact occurs with the tibia of the 50th percentile adult male and with the thigh of the 6-year-old child. The head of a 50th percentile male impacts the lower windshield, while the 6-year-old child's head impacts the front part of the hood.
Journal Article

Improving Earpiece Accelerometer Coupling to the Head

2008-12-02
2008-01-2978
As accurate measuring of head accelerations is an important aspect in predicting head injury, it is important that the measuring sensor be well-coupled to the head. Various sensors and sensor mounting schemes have been attempted in the past with varying results. This study uses a small, implantable acceleration sensor pack in the ear to study impact coupling with the human skull. The output from these ear-mounted accelerometers is compared to laboratory reference accelerometers rigidly attached to the skull of two cadaveric head specimens for both low-amplitude oscillatory tests and high-amplitude impact drop tests. The combination of sensor type and mounting scheme demonstrates the feasibility of using ear mounted sensors to predict head acceleration response. Previously reported progressive phase lag was not seen in this study, with the comparison between ear mounted accelerometers and rigidly mounted head accelerometers ranging from very good to excellent.
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