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Technical Paper

CFD Analysis of Flow Field and Pressure Losses in Carburetor Venturi

2006-11-13
2006-32-0113
A commercial CFD package was used to develop a three-dimensional, fully turbulent model of the compressible flow across a complex-geometry venturi, such as those typically found in small engine carburetors. The results of the CFD simulations were used to understand the effect of the different obstacles in the flow on the overall discharge coefficient and the static pressure at the tip of the fuel tube. It was found that the obstacles located at the converging nozzle of the venturi do not cause significant pressure losses, while those obstacles that create wakes in the flow, such as the fuel tube and throttle plate, are responsible for most of the pressure losses. This result indicated that an overall discharge coefficient can be used to correct the mass flow rate, while a localized correction factor can be determined from three-dimensional CFD simulations in order to calculate the static pressure at locations of interest within the venturi.
Technical Paper

Numerical and Theoretical Fuel Flow Analysis of Small Engine Carburetor Idle Circuits

2006-11-13
2006-32-0111
This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the fuel and air flows within the idle circuit found in simple carburetors. The idle circuit is modeled numerically using a dynamic model that considers the resistances of the flow paths as well as the inertia of the fuel. The modeling methodology is flexible, in that the organization and techniques can be applied to any configuration and geometry. The numerical model calculates the fuel flow response of carburetor idle/transition circuits to pressure variations associated with air flow through the venturi and around the throttle plate. The model is implemented for a typical small engine carburetor and the nominal results are presented for this specific design.
Technical Paper

Simulation of the Effect of Spatial Fuel Distribution Using a Linear-Eddy Model

2007-10-29
2007-01-4131
Prior HCCI optical engine experiments utilizing laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of stratified fuel-air mixtures have demonstrated the utility of probability density function (PDF) statistics for correlating mixture preparation with combustion. However, PDF statistics neglect all spatial details of in-cylinder fuel distribution. The current computational paper examines the effects of spatial fuel distribution on combustion using a novel combination of a 3-D CFD model with a 1-D linear-eddy model of turbulent mixing. In the simulations, the spatial coarseness of initial fuel distribution prior to the start of heat release is varied while keeping PDF statistics constant. Several cases are run, and as the initial mixture is made coarser, combustion phasing monotonically advances due to high local equivalence ratios that persist longer. The effect of turbulent mixing is more complex.
Technical Paper

Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Mixing and Combustion of a Two-Stroke Direct-Injection Spark Ignition Engine

2001-03-05
2001-01-1228
Multi-Dimensional modeling was carried out for a Mercury Marine two-stroke DISI engine. Recently developed spray, ignition, and combustion models were applied to medium load cases with an air-fuel ratio of 30:1. Three injection timings, 271, 291 and 306 ATDC were selected to investigate the effects of the injection timing on mixture formation, ignition and combustion. The results indicate that at this particular load condition, earlier injection timing allows more fuel to evaporate. However, because the fuel penetrates further toward the piston, a leaner mixture is created near the spark plug; thus, a slower ignition process with a weaker ignition kernel was found for the SOI 271 ATDC case. The measured and computed combustion results such as average in-cylinder pressure and NOx are in good agreements. The later injection case produces lower NOx emission and higher CO emission; this is due to poor mixing and is in agreement with experimental measurements.
Technical Paper

Development of an Ignition and Combustion Model for Spark-Ignition Engines

2000-10-16
2000-01-2809
A new ignition and combustion model has been developed and tested for use in premixed spark-ignition engines. The ignition model is referred to as the Discrete Particle Ignition Kernel (DPIK) model, and it uses Lagrangian markers to track the flame-front growth. The model includes the effects of electrode heat transfer on the early flame kernel growth process, and it is used in conjunction with a characteristic-time-scale combustion model once the ignition kernel has grown to a size where the effects of turbulence on the flame must be considered. A new term which accounts for the effect of air-fuel ratio, was added to the combustion model for modeling combustion in very lean and very rich mixtures. The flame kernel size predicted by the DPIK model was compared with measurements of Maly and Vogel. Furthermore, predictions of the electrode heat transfer were compared with data of Kravchik and Heywood. In both comparisons the model predictions were in good agreement with the experiments.
Technical Paper

On Non-Equilibrium Turbulence Corrections in Multidimensional HSDI Diesel Engine Computations

2001-03-05
2001-01-0997
The introduction of high-pressure injection systems in D.I. diesel engines has highlighted already known drawbacks of in-cylinder turbulence modeling. In particular, the well known equilibrium hypothesis is far from being valid even during the compression stroke and moreover during the spray injection and combustion processes when turbulence energy transfer between scales occurs under non-equilibrium conditions. The present paper focuses on modeling in-cylinder engine turbulent flows. Turbulence is accounted for by using the RNG k-ε model which is based on equilibrium turbulence assumptions. By using a modified version of the Kiva-3 code, different mathematically based corrections to the computed macro length scale are proposed in order to account for non-equilibrium effects. These new approaches are applied to a simulation of a recent generation HSDI Diesel engine at both full load and partial load conditions representative of the emission EUDC cycle.
Technical Paper

Fuel Injection and Mean Swirl Effects on Combustion and Soot Formation in Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-0912
High-speed video imaging in a swirl-supported (Rs = 1.7), direct-injection heavy-duty diesel engine operated with moderate-to-high EGR rates reveals a distinct correlation between the spatial distribution of luminous soot and mean flow vorticity in the horizontal plane. The temporal behavior of the experimental images, as well as the results of multi-dimensional numerical simulations, show that this soot-vorticity correlation is caused by the presence of a greater amount of soot on the windward side of the jet. The simulations indicate that while flow swirl can influence pre-ignition mixing processes as well as post-combustion soot oxidation processes, interactions between the swirl and the heat release can also influence mixing processes. Without swirl, combustion-generated gas flows influence mixing on both sides of the jet equally. In the presence of swirl, the heat release occurs on the leeward side of the fuel sprays.
Technical Paper

Theoretical Analysis of Waste Heat Recovery from an Internal Combustion Engine in a Hybrid Vehicle

2006-04-03
2006-01-1605
This paper presents a theoretical study of different strategies of waste heat recovery in an internal combustion engine, operating in a hybrid vehicle (spark ignition engine and electric motor). Many of the previous studies of energy recovery from waste heat focused on running thermodynamic cycles with the objective of supplying air-conditioning loads. There are two elements of this study that are different from previous studies: first, the end use of the recovered waste heat is the generation of electric power, and, second, the implementation of these heat recovery strategies takes place in a hybrid vehicle. The constant load conditions for the SI-engine in the hybrid vehicle are a potential advantage for the implementation of a heat recovery system. Three configurations of Rankine cycles were considered: a cycle running with the exhaust gases, a cycle with the engine coolant system, and a combined exhaust-engine coolant system.
Technical Paper

Product Selectivity During Regeneration of Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

2006-10-16
2006-01-3441
NOx reduction product speciation during regeneration of a fully formulated lean NOx trap catalyst has been investigated using a bench-scale flow reactor. NH3 and N2O were both observed during the regeneration phase of fast lean/rich cycles that simulated engine operation. Formation of both products increased with higher reductant concentrations and lower temperatures. Steady flow experiments were used to decouple the regeneration reactions from the NOx storage and release processes. This approach enabled a detailed investigation into the reactions that cause both formation and destruction of non-N2 reduction products. Pseudo-steady state experiments with simultaneous flow of NOx and reductant indicated that high concentrations of CO or H2 drive the reduction reactions toward NH3 formation, while mixtures that are stoichiometric for N2 formation favor N2. These experiments also showed that NH3 is readily oxidized by both NO and O2 over the LNT catalyst.
Technical Paper

Effects of Engine Operating Parameters on near Stoichiometric Diesel Combustion Characteristics

2007-04-16
2007-01-0121
Stoichiometric combustion could enable a three-way catalyst to be used for treating NOx emissions of diesel engines, which is one of the most difficult species for diesel engines to meet future emission regulations. Previous study by Lee et al. [1] showed that diesel engines can operate with stoichiometric combustion successfully with only a minor impact on fuel consumption. Low NOx emission levels were another advantage of stoichiometric operation according to that study. In this study, the characteristics of stoichiometric diesel combustion were evaluated experimentally to improve fuel economy as well as exhaust emissions The effects of fuel injection pressure, boost pressure, swirl, intake air temperature, combustion regime (injection timing), and engine load (fuel mass injected) were assessed under stoichiometric conditions.
Technical Paper

A Computational Investigation into the Effects of Spray Targeting, Bowl Geometry and Swirl Ratio for Low-Temperature Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-0119
A computational study was performed to evaluate the effects of bowl geometry, fuel spray targeting and swirl ratio under highly diluted, low-temperature combustion conditions in a heavy-duty diesel engine. This study is used to examine aspects of low-temperature combustion that are affected by mixing processes and offers insight into the effect these processes have on emissions formation and oxidation. The foundation for this exploratory study stems from a large data set which was generated using a genetic algorithm optimization methodology. The main results suggest that an optimal combination of spray targeting, swirl ratio and bowl geometry exist to simultaneously minimize emissions formation and improve soot and CO oxidation rates. Spray targeting was found to have a significant impact on the emissions and fuel consumption performance, and was furthermore found to be the most influential design parameter explored in this study.
Technical Paper

Assessment of Diesel Engine Size-Scaling Relationships

2007-04-16
2007-01-0127
Engine development is both time consuming and economically straining. Therefore, efforts are being made to optimize the research and development process for new engine technologies. The ability to apply information gained by studying an engine of one size/application to an engine of a completely different size/application would offer savings in both time and money in engine development. In this work, a computational study of diesel engine size-scaling relationships was performed to explore engine scaling parameters and the fundamental engine operating components that should be included in valid scaling arguments. Two scaling arguments were derived and tested: a simple, equal spray penetration scaling model and an extended, equal lift-off length scaling model. The simple scaling model is based on an equation for the conservation of mass and an equation for spray tip penetration developed by Hiroyasu et al. [1].
Technical Paper

Flamelet Modeling with LES for Diesel Engine Simulations

2006-04-03
2006-01-0058
Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with a flamelet time scale combustion model is used to simulate diesel combustion. The flamelet time scale model uses a steady-state flamelet library for n-heptane indexed by mean mixture fraction, mixture fraction variance, and mean scalar dissipation rate. In the combustion model, reactions proceed towards the flamelet library solution at a time scale associated with the slowest reaction. This combination of a flamelet solution and a chemical time scale helps to account for unsteady mixing effects. The turbulent sub-grid stresses are simulated using a one-equation, non-viscosity LES model called the dynamic structure model. The model uses a tensor coefficient determined by the dynamic procedure and the subgrid kinetic energy. The model has been expanded to include scalar mixing and scalar dissipation. A new model for the conditional scalar dissipation has been developed to better predict local extinction.
Technical Paper

Modeling Early Injection Processes in HSDI Diesel Engines

2006-04-03
2006-01-0056
Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the combustion process in the Premixed Compression Ignition (PCI) regime in a light-duty diesel engine. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V release 2 code to simulate combustion and emission characteristics using reduced chemistry. The test engine used for validation data was a single cylinder version of a production 1.9L four-cylinder HSDI diesel engine. The engine operating condition considered was 2,000 rev/min and 5 bar BMEP load. Because high EGR levels are required for combustion retardation to make PCI combustion possible, the EGR rate was set at a relatively high level (40%) and injection timing sweeps were considered. Since injection timings were very advanced, impingement of the fuel spray on the piston bowl wall was unavoidable. To model the effects of fuel films on exhaust emissions, a drop and wall interaction model was implemented in the present code.
Technical Paper

Comparison of the Characteristic Time (CTC), Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF), and Direct Integration with Detailed Chemistry Combustion Models against Optical Diagnostic Data for Multi-Mode Combustion in a Heavy-Duty DI Diesel Engine

2006-04-03
2006-01-0055
Three different approaches for modeling diesel engine combustion are compared against cylinder pressure, NOx emissions, high-speed soot luminosity imaging, and 2-color thermometry data from a heavy-duty DI diesel engine. A characteristic time combustion (KIVA-CTC) model, a representative interactive flamelet (KIVA-RIF) model, and direct integration using detailed chemistry (KIVA-CHEMKIN) were integrated into the same version of the KIVA-3v computer code. In this way, the computer code provides a common platform for comparing various combustion models. Five different engine operating strategies that are representative of several different combustion regimes were explored in the experiments and model simulations. Two of the strategies produce high-temperature combustion with different ignition delays, while the other three use dilution to achieve low-temperature combustion (LTC), with early, late, or multiple injections.
Technical Paper

Development and Application of a Non-Gradient Step-Controlled Search Algorithm for Engine Combustion Optimization

2006-04-03
2006-01-0239
A new search technique, called Non-Gradient Step-Controlled algorithm (NGSC), is presented. The NGSC was applied independently from pre-selected starting points and as a supplement to a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to optimize a HSDI diesel engine using split injection strategies. It is shown that the NGSC handles well the challenges of a complex response surface and factor high-dimensionality, which demonstrates its capability as an efficient and accurate tool to seek “local” convergence on complex surfaces. By directly tracking the change of a merit function, the NGSC places no requirement on response surface continuity / differentiability, and hence is more robust than gradient-dependent search techniques. The directional search mechanism takes factor interactions into consideration, and search step size control is adopted to facilitate search efficiency.
Technical Paper

Spark Ignition Engine Combustion Modeling Using a Level Set Method with Detailed Chemistry

2006-04-03
2006-01-0243
A level set method (G-equation)-based combustion model incorporating detailed chemical kinetics has been developed and implemented in KIVA-3V for Spark-Ignition (SI) engine simulations for better predictions of fuel oxidation and pollutant formation. Detailed fuel oxidation mechanisms coupled with a reduced NOX mechanism are used to describe the chemical processes. The flame front in the spark kernel stage is tracked using the Discrete Particle Ignition Kernel (DPIK) model. In the G-equation model, it is assumed that after the flame front has passed, the mixture within the mean flame brush tends to local equilibrium. The subgrid-scale burnt/unburnt volumes of the flame containing cells are tracked for the primary heat release calculation. A progress variable concept is introduced into the turbulent flame speed correlation to account for the laminar to turbulent evolution of the spark kernel flame.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Numerical Results and Experimental Data on Emission Production Processes in a Diesel Engine

2001-03-05
2001-01-0656
Simulations of DI Diesel engine combustion have been performed using a modified KIVA-II package with a recently developed phenomenological soot model. The phenomenological soot model includes generic description of fuel pyrolysis, soot particle inception, coagulation, and surface growth and oxidation. The computational results are compared with experimental data from a Cummins N14 single cylinder test engine. Results of the simulations show acceptable agreement with experimental data in terms of cylinder pressure, rate of heat release, and engine-out NOx and soot emissions for a range of fuel injection timings considered. The numerical results are also post-processed to obtain time-resolved soot radiation intensity and compared with the experimental data analyzed using two-color optical pyrometry. The temperature magnitude and KL trends show favorable agreement.
Technical Paper

Non-Intrusive Low Cost Cylinder Pressure Transducer for Internal Combustion Engine Monitoring and Control

2009-04-20
2009-01-0245
The objective of this research is to develop a concept for a low cost, non-intrusive sensor to enable the monitoring of in-cylinder pressure on internal combustion engines. This research should enable the use of cylinder pressure information to be extended into smaller in-service internal combustion engines particularly when “closed loop” control is required to control combustion. This paper details the development results of a new concept for a low cost non-intrusive cylinder pressure sensor utilizing the movement of an engine valve when subjected to cylinder pressure. The conclusions drawn in this paper are that a system for measuring in-cylinder pressure using a valve movement sensor is possible at the required accuracy and could be lower cost than the current best technology.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of In-Cylinder Processes Under Dual-Injection Conditions in a DI Diesel Engine

2004-06-08
2004-01-1843
Fuel-injection schedules that use two injection events per cycle (“dual-injection” approaches) have the potential to simultaneously attenuate engine-out soot and NOx emissions. The extent to which these benefits are due to enhanced mixing, low-temperature combustion modes, altered combustion phasing, or other factors is not fully understood. A traditional single-injection, an early-injection-only, and two dual-injection cases are studied using a suite of imaging diagnostics including spray visualization, natural luminosity imaging, and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of nitric oxide (NO). These data, coupled with heat-release and efficiency analyses, are used to enhance understanding of the in-cylinder processes that lead to the observed emissions reductions.
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