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Technical Paper

Injection and Ignition Effects on Two-Stroke Direct Injection Emissions and Efficiency

1996-08-01
961803
To help understand the fundamental processes involved in direct injection, a research project was conducted using a single-cylinder, two-stroke research engine at a mid-speed, boat load operating condition. A 24 statistical factorial experimental design was applied. Of the factors tested at this operating condition, spray type was the most important factor affecting hydrocarbon emissions, followed by in-cylinder flow-related factors. Injection spray was also most important for nitrogen oxide emissions, carbon monoxide emissions, and efficiency. The dominant mechanism influencing the results was misfire, with other mechanisms present for specific responses.
Technical Paper

Spray Combustion and Emissions in a Direct-Injection Two Stroke Engine With Wall-Stabilization of an Air-Assisted Spray

1997-02-24
970360
Previous experiments using an air-assisted spray in a two-stroke direct-injected engine demonstrated a significant improvement in combustion stability at part-load conditions when a wide injection spray was used. It was hypothesized that the decrease in variability was due to the spray following the combustion chamber wall, making it less affected by variations in the in-cylinder gas flows. For this study, experiments were conducted to investigate engine spray combustion for cases where engine performance was not dominated by cyclic variation. Combustion and emission performance data was collected for a wide range of injection timings at several speed/load conditions. Experimental data for combustion shows that combustion stability is relatively unaffected by injection timing changes over a 40 to 100 degree window, and tolerant to spark gap projections over a range of 0.7 to 5.2 mm, depending on operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Comparison Between Air-Assisted and Single-Fluid Pressure Atomizers for Direct-Injection SI Engines Via Spatial and Temporal Mass Flux Measurements

1997-02-24
970630
Two distinct atomization strategies are contrasted through the measurement of time and spatially dependent mass flux. The two systems investigated include a pressure atomizer (6.9 MPa opening pressure) and an air-assist atomizer. Both systems have potential for use in direct injection spark ignition engines. The mass flux data presented were obtained using a spray patternator that was developed to allow phased sampling of the spray. The temporal mass related history of the spray was reconstructed as volume versus time plots and interpolated mass flux contour plots. Results indicate substantial differences in the distribution of both mass and mass flux in space and time for the two injection systems. For example, the pressure atomizer at high mass delivery rates produced a spray that collapsed into a dispersed cylindrical shape while at low rates, generated a hollow cone structure.
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