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Technical Paper

High Efficient LED Headlamp Design-Styling versus Light Performance

2007-04-16
2007-01-0874
First LED headlamps will be released into the market in 2007. Special permissions allow this introduction although the official regulation is still under discussion in ECE. The LED technology for front lighting has entered into a new phase from theoretical, prototype status to real and practical applications. Additionally in Europe the legislation, which is under preparation, defines LED modules with one or more LED chips in a row which should be replaceable. With this boundary conditions headlamp suppliers needs to balance between an attractive and innovative styling, demanded by car manufacturers and the light performance to gurantee good visibility at night. The paper describes the methods how to design an LED headlamp with high efficiency by keeping in mind the parameters: packaging, weight, styling and light perfromance. Results with specific design proposals are shown.
Technical Paper

Design Parameter Tradeoffs for LED Headlamp Applications

2007-04-16
2007-01-0871
High-power LEDs and LED headlamps have become a serious consideration for the automotive industry. White LEDs have achieved the required performance for initial automotive headlamp applications. However tradeoffs among several attributes such as efficiency, cost, weight and performance profoundly affect LED headlamp development and need to be addressed by vehicle manufacturers, lamp set makers and LED source suppliers in order for LED headlamps to be effective. The solutions to these tradeoffs relates to the behavior of the LED sources, the thermo-mechanical integration of LEDs in a headlamp environment and input from the vehicle manufacturer regarding styling and packaging for an LED headlamp on the respective targeted vehicles.
Technical Paper

Towards Development of Thermal Standards for the Design of LED Lamps

2007-04-16
2007-01-1037
Even though the use of LED's in automotive industry is continuously increasing, the test standards used for the thermal design of the lamps do not address the unique needs of LED based lamps. The challenge becomes more significant because LED's are semiconductor devices with lower maximum operating temperatures and photometric properties that depend on temperature. This paper presents sunload test results and lamp thermal data measured on vehicles undergoing simulated driving conditions in a lab environment. The data clearly indicates substantial differences in the measured data versus the test conditions to which the lamps are designed today. It is recommended to modify test standards that the lamps must meet to more closely emulate the field conditions.
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