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Technical Paper

Development of a Steer-by-Wire System for the GM Sequel

2006-04-03
2006-01-1173
Steer-by-wire systems (SBW) offer the potential to enhance steering functionality by enabling features such as automatic lane keeping, park assist, variable steer ratio, and advanced vehicle dynamics control. The lack of a steering intermediate shaft significantly enhances vehicle architectural flexibility. These potential benefits led GM to include steer-by-wire technology in its next generation fuel cell demonstration vehicle, called “Sequel.” The Sequel's steer-by-wire system consists of front and rear electromechanical actuators, a torque feedback emulator for the steering wheel, and a distributed electronic control system. Redundancy of sensors, actuators, controllers, and power allows the system to be fault-tolerant. Control is provided by multiple ECU's that are linked by a fault-tolerant communication system called FlexRay. In this paper, we describe the objectives for fault tolerance and performance that were established for the Sequel.
Technical Paper

The Mobile Wireless Ether - Finding Its Way Into the Automobile

2002-10-21
2002-21-0046
The application and usage of various wide-area (long range) to personal-area (short range) wireless technologies and associated services in automobiles has arrived. It is essential for implementers to understand the parameters and capabilities of these technologies, many of which utilize and depend upon remote data/information transport services across one or more physical and logical entities within an automobile. This dependence, coupled with unique and typically diverse operational characteristics and requirements of the various wireless technologies, presents significant integration challenges to the automotive OEM and systems/components providers. Investigating and providing insight into managing this complexity for currently and soon to be deployed wireless technologies is addressed in this paper.
Journal Article

Connected Car Architecture and Virtualization

2016-04-05
2016-01-0081
Connectivity has become an essential need for daily device users. With the car projected to be the “ultimate mobile device”, connectivity modules will eventually be mainstream in every car. Network providers are expanding their infrastructure and technology to accommodate the connected cars. Besides making voice and emergency calls the connected car will be sharing data with telematics service providers, back end systems and other vehicles. This trend will increase vehicle modules, complexity, entry points and vulnerabilities. This paper will present the current connected car architectures. The paper will present current architectural issues of the connected car and its vulnerabilities. The paper will present a new proposed architecture for the future connected car that enhances efficiency and security.
Journal Article

Ensuring Audio Signal Quality in Automotive Infotainment Systems

2013-04-08
2013-01-0163
In automotive infotainment systems, multiple types of digital audio signals are usually present. Some come from internal sources, such as a CD or USB stick, and some come from external sources, such as an internet stream or digital radio. These sources usually have different sample-rates, and may also be different from one or more system sample-rates. Managing and transporting these signals throughout the system over different sample-rate domains require detailed upfront architecture analysis and correct system design to ensure signal quality is maintained to the desired level. Incorrect design can add significant user-perceivable noise and distortion. This paper examines the key analysis factors, the effects of poor design and the approaches for achieving robust signal handling and ensuring desired signal quality.
Journal Article

Assessment of Automatic Volume Leveling for Automotive Sound Systems

2013-04-08
2013-01-0162
This paper presents an assessment of competing algorithms for normalizing volume levels between tracks and/or sources in an automotive infotainment system. Portable media players such as smartphones and iPod® devices are extremely popular for listening to music collections or streaming content from the Internet. The lack of normalization is a source of dissatisfaction if the user experiences significant changes in audio level between tracks. Several commercially available algorithms exist to solve this problem. This research includes a double-blind listening test comparing an audio sample processed with the different leveling algorithms to an unprocessed reference. The listener preference rating is recorded and results indicate which algorithm is preferred.
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