Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Search Results

Technical Paper

Compressor Body Temperature and Lubrication

2013-04-08
2013-01-1501
The paper addresses compressor body temperature (crankcase) importance to the vehicle AC system long-term durability. Majority of OEM vehicle test evaluation is to see if AC system can pass compressor discharge temperature and discharge pressure targets. Most OEMs adopt 130°C max compressor discharge temperature and 2350 kpag head pressure as the target. From the field, although some of the compressor failure results from a high compression ratio, and compressor discharge temperature that are caused by the poor front end airflow, etc., high percentage compressor failed systems exhibit not too high compression ratio and compressor discharge temperature, but having the trace of high temperature in the shaft area, gasket area, etc. With introducing more and more variable swash plate compressor applications, OEMs start to see more and more compressor failures that are not related to a high compressor discharge temperature but the trace of high compressor body temperature.
Technical Paper

Human Factors Flight Test Evaluation of an Airport Surface Display with Indications & Alerts (SURF IA)

2010-09-30
2010-01-1663
This paper presents the results of a human factors flight test evaluation of a display of Enhanced Traffic Situational Awareness on the Airport Surface with Indications and Alerts (SURF IA). The study is an element of the FAA-sponsored Surface Conflict Detection and Alerting with Consideration of Arrival Applications program. The objective of the flight test was to conduct a comparative evaluation of two candidate SURF IA displays: a detailed Airport Surface Situation Awareness (ASSA) display and a runways-only Final Approach Runway Occupancy Awareness (FAROA) display. Six pilots with a current Air Transport Pilot Certificate each completed 18 scenarios. A Beechcraft King Air C-90 and a Cessna Citation Sovereign aircraft were deployed for the flight tests. The scenarios were conducted at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and at Snohomish County Paine Field Airport, with each aircraft acting as ‘traffic’ for the other aircraft.
Journal Article

Assessment of Automatic Volume Leveling for Automotive Sound Systems

2013-04-08
2013-01-0162
This paper presents an assessment of competing algorithms for normalizing volume levels between tracks and/or sources in an automotive infotainment system. Portable media players such as smartphones and iPod® devices are extremely popular for listening to music collections or streaming content from the Internet. The lack of normalization is a source of dissatisfaction if the user experiences significant changes in audio level between tracks. Several commercially available algorithms exist to solve this problem. This research includes a double-blind listening test comparing an audio sample processed with the different leveling algorithms to an unprocessed reference. The listener preference rating is recorded and results indicate which algorithm is preferred.
Journal Article

Ensuring Audio Signal Quality in Automotive Infotainment Systems

2013-04-08
2013-01-0163
In automotive infotainment systems, multiple types of digital audio signals are usually present. Some come from internal sources, such as a CD or USB stick, and some come from external sources, such as an internet stream or digital radio. These sources usually have different sample-rates, and may also be different from one or more system sample-rates. Managing and transporting these signals throughout the system over different sample-rate domains require detailed upfront architecture analysis and correct system design to ensure signal quality is maintained to the desired level. Incorrect design can add significant user-perceivable noise and distortion. This paper examines the key analysis factors, the effects of poor design and the approaches for achieving robust signal handling and ensuring desired signal quality.
Technical Paper

Key Aspects of Electronics Automotive Components Testing

2013-10-07
2013-36-0569
Electronics components are estimated to be between 9 to 15 % of a total vehicle cost, and this trend will remain strong for the next years. The amount of electronics content in a vehicle has grown steadily since 1970's, and as a result, development challenges such as testing and validation are a key aspect of its overall development costs. Testing costs can amount easily to US$ 500 k in medium complex automotive parts of a vehicle (e.g. instrument cluster) depending on a specific OEM customer demand, and this on top of limited regional laboratory capacity can also lead to increased testing time. The goal of this paper is to outline key aspects of electronics in vehicle components testing, including overall costs and timing, and propose a lean approach to optimize such costs & timing. The key aspects of such optimization include not only resources, but also laboratories and upfront OEM customer planning.
Technical Paper

Statistical Modeling of Fatigue Crack Growth in Wing Skin Fastener Holes

2012-04-16
2012-01-0482
Estimation and prediction of residual life and reliability are serious concerns in life cycle management for aging structures. Laboratory testing replicating fatigue loading for a typical military aircraft wing skin was undertaken. Specimens were tested until their fatigue life expended reached 100% of the component fatigue life. Then, scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify the size and location of fatigue cracks within the high stress regions of simulated fastener holes. Distributions for crack size, nearest neighbor distances, and spatial location were characterized statistically in order to estimate residual life and to provide input for life cycle management. Insights into crack initiation and growth are also provided.
Journal Article

A New Automotive Air Conditioning System Simulation Tool Developed in MATLAB/Simulink

2013-04-08
2013-01-0850
Accurate evaluation of vehicles' transient total power requirement helps achieving further improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency. When operated, the air-conditioning (A/C) system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle, therefore accurate evaluation of the load it places on the vehicle's engine and/or energy storage system is especially important. Vehicle simulation models, such as "Autonomie," have been used by OEMs to evaluate vehicles' energy performance. However, the load from the A/C system on the engine or on the energy storage system has not always been modeled in sufficient detail. A transient A/C simulation tool incorporated into vehicle simulation models would also provide a tool for developing more efficient A/C systems through a thorough consideration of the transient A/C system performance. The dynamic system simulation software MATLAB/Simulink® is frequently used by vehicle controls engineers to develop new and more efficient vehicle energy system controls.
Technical Paper

Vibration Test Specification for Automotive Products Based on Measured Vehicle Load Data

2006-04-03
2006-01-0729
A test load specification is required to validate an automotive product to meet the durability and design life requirements. Traditionally in the automotive industry, load specifications for design validation tests are directly given by OEMs, which are generally developed from an envelop of generic customer usage profiles and are, in most cases, over-specified. In recent years, however, there are many occasions that a proposed load specification for a particular product is requested. The particular test load specification for a particular product is generated based on the measured load data at its mounting location on the given type of vehicles, which contains more realistic time domain load levels and associated frequency contents. The measured time domain load is then processed to frequency domain test load data by using the fast Fourier transform and damage equivalent techniques.
Technical Paper

Combustion Characteristics Detection for Low Pressure Direct Injection Engines Using Ionization Signal

2006-10-16
2006-01-3317
It is well-known that in-cylinder ionization signals can be used for detecting combustion characteristics of IC (Internal Combustion) engines. For example, engine misfire, incomplete combustion (or partial-burn), knock, MBT (Minimum spark advance for Best Torque) timing and combustion stability can be detected using in-cylinder ionization signals. In addition, closed loop combustion spark timing control strategies have been developed to control engine MBT timing and to manage spark timing advance (knock) and retard (incomplete combustion) limits. In-cylinder ionization signals can also be used for closed loop control of maximum equivalence ratio (lean limit) at a desired combustion stability level. Up to now, most of the ionization applications have been for PFI (Port Fuel Injection) engines. This paper presents ionization detection for gasoline Direct Injection (DI) engines.
Technical Paper

An Efficient Alternative for Computing Algorithm Detection Thresholds

2006-04-03
2006-01-0009
Commonly, a significant event is detected when a normally stable engine parameter (ex. sensor voltage, sensor current, air flow, pedal position, fuel level, tire pressure, engine acceleration, etc.) transiently exceeds a calibrated detection threshold. Many implementations of detection thresholds rely on multi-input lookup tables or functions and are complex and difficult to calibrate. An approach is presented to minimize threshold calibration effort and complexity, while improving detection performance, by dynamically computing thresholds on-line based on current real-time data. Determining engine synchronization without a camshaft position sensor is presented as an illustrative application.
Technical Paper

New Designs and Concepts for Vehicle Entertainment Systems

2006-11-21
2006-01-2828
The need for entertainment is a constant desire since human beans started to use vehicles for short and long distance travel. The radio, a home entertainment revolution, was the first one to be incorporated. The information and entertainment that initially brought the radio to the vehicles also started a major change on the interior and electrical systems. This revolution will require changes in vehicle design to accommodate the new concepts and features.
Technical Paper

Fuel Rail Pressure Relief

2006-04-03
2006-01-0626
A major source of engine-off evaporative hydrocarbon emissions is fuel injector leakage. Methods and devices to relieve fuel rail pressure after key-off, and thus reduce leakage are introduced. Impact on fuel manifold re-pressurization is considered. The basic principles governing this behavior: fuel thermal expansion, fuel vapor pressure, and dissolved gasses in liquid are elaborated. Fuel pressure relief data is shown.
Technical Paper

A Table Update Method for Adaptive Knock Control

2006-04-03
2006-01-0607
Knock correction is the spark angle retard applied to the optimum ignition timing to eliminate knock. In adaptive knock control, this amount of spark retard at an operating point (i.e. Speed, load) is stored in a speed/load characteristic map. It will be reused when the engine is operated in this range once more. In this paper, a method to learn the knock correction values into a speed/load characteristic map is described. This method proportionally distributes the knock correction into the characteristic map according to the distance between the speed/load of these nodes and the current operating point. The distributed knock correction value is filtered and accumulated in its adjacent nodes. Simulation examples demonstrate that the retrieved values from the map by the proposed method are smoother than those produced by the method of [2][3]. The mathematical basis for this method is developed. The one and two independent variable cases are illustrated.
Technical Paper

Prediction of Vehicle Steering System NVH from Component-Level Test Data

2006-04-03
2006-01-0483
This work demonstrates a practical method for predicting vehicle-level automotive steering system NVH performance from component-level NVH measurements of hydraulic steering pumps. For this method, in-vehicle measurements were completed to quantify vehicle noise path characteristics, including steering system structure borne, fluid borne and airborne paths. At the component level, measurements of steering pump reaction forces, sound power and dynamic hydraulic pressure were also completed. The vehicle-level measurement data was used to construct NVH transfer functions for the vehicle. These transfer functions were in turn combined with the pump component data measured on a test stand to create a prediction for steering pump order vehicle interior noise. The accuracy of these predicted values was assessed through comparison with actual vehicle interior noise measurements.
Technical Paper

Statistical Identification and Analysis of Vehicle Noise Transfer Paths

2005-05-16
2005-01-2511
Identification of vibration transfer paths is critical to proper isolation of vibration excitations from becoming objectionable noise in a vehicle. Traditional transfer path methods involve comparing vibration inputs to the outputs of each joint. This method can be time consuming and inefficient due to a complexity of paths. A new statistical method was developed to improve the efficiency of testing. This method requires the measurement of the excitation vibration input at each joint of the source component and response sound measurements in the vehicle. Identification of transfer paths using regression analysis will determine the trouble paths to scrutinize.
Technical Paper

Multivariate Statistical Methods for the Analysis of NVH Data

2005-05-16
2005-01-2518
The present work discusses the application of multivariate statistical methods for the analysis of NVH data. Unlike conventional statistical methods which generally consider single-value, or univariate data, multivariate methods enable the user to examine multiple response variables and their interactions simultaneously. This characteristic is particularly useful in the examination of NVH data, where multiple measurements are typically used to assess NVH performance. In this work, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was used to examine the NVH data from a benchmarking study of hydraulic steering pumps. A total of twelve NVH measurements for each of 99 pump samples were taken. These measurements included steering pump orders and overall levels for vibration and sound pressure level at two microphone locations. Application of the PCA method made it possible to examine the entire set of data at once.
Technical Paper

Development of a Steer-by-Wire System for the GM Sequel

2006-04-03
2006-01-1173
Steer-by-wire systems (SBW) offer the potential to enhance steering functionality by enabling features such as automatic lane keeping, park assist, variable steer ratio, and advanced vehicle dynamics control. The lack of a steering intermediate shaft significantly enhances vehicle architectural flexibility. These potential benefits led GM to include steer-by-wire technology in its next generation fuel cell demonstration vehicle, called “Sequel.” The Sequel's steer-by-wire system consists of front and rear electromechanical actuators, a torque feedback emulator for the steering wheel, and a distributed electronic control system. Redundancy of sensors, actuators, controllers, and power allows the system to be fault-tolerant. Control is provided by multiple ECU's that are linked by a fault-tolerant communication system called FlexRay. In this paper, we describe the objectives for fault tolerance and performance that were established for the Sequel.
Technical Paper

Broadband Noise Source Models as Aeroacoustic Tools in Designing Low NVH HVAC Ducts

2006-04-03
2006-01-1192
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an integral part of product development at Visteon Climate Systems with a validated set of CFD tools for airflow and thermal management processes. As we increasingly build CAE capabilities to design not only thermal comfort, but quiet systems, developing noise prediction capabilities becomes a high priority. Two Broadband Noise Source (BNS) models will be presented, namely Proudman's model for quadrupole source and Curle's boundary layer model for dipole source. Both models are derived from Lighthill's acoustic analogy which is based on the Navier-Stokes equations. BNS models provide aeroacoustic tools that are effective in screening air handling systems with higher noise levels and identifying components or surfaces that generate most of the noise, hence providing opportunities for early design changes. In this paper, BNS models were used as aeroacoustic design tools to redesign an automotive HVAC center duct with high levels of NVH.
Technical Paper

A Filter Seal Model for Point Mobility Prediction of Air Induction Systems

2006-04-03
2006-01-1209
Virtual design validation of an air induction system (AIS) requires a proper finite element (FE) assembly model for various simulation based design tasks. The effect of the urethane air filter seal within an AIS assembly, however, still poses a technical challenge to the modeling of structural dynamic behaviors of the AIS product. In this paper, a filter seal model and its modeling approach for AIS assemblies are introduced, by utilizing the feature finite elements and empiric test data. A bushing element is used to model the unique nonlinear stiffness and damping properties of the urethane seal, as a function of seal orientation, preloading, temperature and excitation frequency, which are quantified based on the test data and empiric formula. Point mobility is used to character dynamic behaviors of an AIS structure under given loadings, as a transfer function in frequency domain.
Technical Paper

Automotive Axle Simulation and Correlation

2006-04-03
2006-01-1255
Up to date, computer aided engineering (CAE) has been used in improvement of design quality and reduction of cost and delivery time. Although it has been widely accepted as a standard product development tool by the engineering community, CAE still faces many challenges in improving simulation process efficiency through process integration and automation, and simulation accuracy by analytical model/physical testing correlation. CAE engineers are constantly improving the accuracy of their analytical models through test correlation to deliver higher confidence for their analysis result. Although laboratory testing has provided an effective way to accelerate product development, analytical simulation of the lab test has been used frequently to further reduce the development cost and time throughout many industries. This paper presents a case study of CAE correlation of a finite element (FE) model of an automotive beam axle assembly in a laboratory test environment.
X