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Technical Paper

Challenges and Opportunities for the Transition to Highly Energy-Efficient Passenger Cars

2011-06-09
2011-37-0013
Maintaining the current ratio between certified and the customer-observed fuel consumption even with future required levels poses a considerable challenge. Increasing the efficiency of the driveline enables certified fuel consumption down to a feasible level in the order of 80 g CO₂/km using fossil fuels. Mainly affecting off-cycle fuel consumption, energy amounts used to create good interior climate as well as energy-consuming options and features threaten to further increase. Progressing urbanization will lead to decreasing average vehicle speeds and driving distances. Highly efficient powertrains come with decreased amounts of waste energy traditionally used for interior climate conditioning, thus making necessary a change of auxiliary systems.
Technical Paper

Optimizing the Natural Gas Engine for CO2 reduction

2016-04-05
2016-01-0875
With alternative fuels having moved more into market in light of their reduction of emissions of CO2 and other air pollutants, the spark ignited internal combustion engine design has only been affected to small extent. The development of combustion engines running on natural gas or Biogas have been focused to maintain driveability on gasoline, creating a multi fuel platform which does not fully utilise the alternative fuels’ potential. However, optimising these concepts on a fundamental level for gas operation shows a great potential to increase the level of utilisation and effectiveness of the engine and thereby meeting the emissions legislation. The project described in this paper has focused on optimising a combustion concept for CNG combustion on a single cylinder research engine. The ICE’s efficiency at full load and the fuels characteristics, including its knock resistance, is of primary interest - together with part load performance and overall fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

Development of the Combustion System for Volvo Cars Euro6d VEA Diesel Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0713
The demands for a future diesel engine in terms of emission compliance, CO2 emissions, performance and cost effectiveness set new requirements for the development process of the combustion system. This paper focuses on the development of the next generation Volvo Cars diesel combustion system, which should comply with Euro 6d including Real Driving Emissions (RDE), with emphasis on the novel methods applied throughout the process. The foundation of a high performing combustion system is formed by first determining the requirements for the system, after which the key factors that affect system performance are selected, such as the charge motion, combustion chamber geometry and injector nozzle geometry. Based on the requirements, a robust charge motion with desired flow characteristics is defined. A new automated CFD optimization process for combustion chamber geometry and spray target is developed.
Technical Paper

Interaction between Fuel Jets and Prevailing Combustion During Closely-Coupled Injections in an Optical LD Diesel Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0551
Two imaging techniques are used to investigate the interaction between developed combustion from earlier injections and partially oxidized fuel (POF) of a subsequent injection. The latter is visualized by using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of formaldehyde and poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. High speed imaging captures the natural luminescence (NL) of the prevailing combustion. Three different fuel injection strategies are studied. One strategy consists of two pilot injections, with modest separations after each, followed by single main and post injections. Both of the other two strategies have three pilots followed by single main and post injections. The separations after the second and third pilots are several times shorter than in the reference case (making them closely-coupled). The closely-coupled cases have more linear heat release rates (HRR) which lead to much lower combustion noise levels.
Technical Paper

Location of the First Auto-Ignition Sites for Two HCCI Systems in a Direct Injection Engine

2004-03-08
2004-01-0564
To elucidate the processes controlling the auto-ignition timing and overall combustion duration in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, the distribution of the auto-ignition sites, in both space and time, was studied. The auto-ignition locations were investigated using optical diagnosis of HCCI combustion, based on laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of formaldehyde in an optical engine with fully variable valve actuation. This engine was operated in two different modes of HCCI. In the first, auto-ignition temperatures were reached by heating the inlet air, while in the second, residual mass from the previous combustion cycle was trapped using a negative valve overlap. The fuel was introduced directly into the combustion chamber in both approaches. To complement these experiments, 3-D numerical modeling of the gas exchange and compression stroke events was done for both HCCI-generating approaches.
Technical Paper

Detailed Heat Release Analyses with Regard to Combustion of RME and Oxygenated Fuels in an HSDI Diesel Engine

2007-04-16
2007-01-0627
Experiments on a modern DI Diesel engine were carried out: The engine was fuelled with standard Diesel fuel, RME and a mixture of 85% standard Diesel fuel, 5% RME and 10% higher alcohols under low load conditions (4 bar IMEP). During these experiments, different external EGR levels were applied while the injection timing was chosen in a way to keep the location of 50% heat release constant. Emission analysis results were in accordance with widely known correlations: Increasing EGR rates lowered NOx emissions. This is explained by a decrease of global air-fuel ratio entailing longer ignition delay. Local gas-fuel ratio increases during ignition delay and local combustion temperature is lowered. Exhaust gas analysis indicated further a strong increase of CO, PM and unburned HC emissions at high EGR levels. This resulted in lower combustion efficiency. PM emissions however, decreased above 50% EGR which was also in accordance with previously reported results.
Technical Paper

Digital Human Models' Appearance Impact on Observers' Ergonomic Assessment

2005-06-14
2005-01-2722
The objective of this paper is to investigate whether different appearance modes of the digital human models (DHM or manikins) affect the observers when judging a working posture. A case where the manikin is manually assembling a battery in the boot with help of a lifting device is used in the experiment. 16 different pictures were created and presented for the subjects. All pictures have the same background, but include a unique posture and manikin appearance combination. Four postures and four manikin appearances were used. The subjects were asked to rank the pictures after ergonomic assessment based on posture of the manikin. Subjects taking part in the study were either manufacturing engineering managers, simulation engineers or ergonomists. Results show that the different appearance modes affect the ergonomic judgment. A more realistic looking manikin is rated higher than the very same posture visualized with a less natural appearance.
Technical Paper

Ion Current Sensing in an Optical HCCI Engine with Negative Valve Overlap

2007-01-23
2007-01-0009
Ion current sensors have high potential utility for obtaining feedback signals directly from the combustion chamber in internal combustion engines. This paper describes experiments performed in a single-cylinder optical engine operated in HCCI mode with negative valve overlap to explore this potential. A high-speed CCD camera was used to visualize the combustion progress in the cylinder, and the photographs obtained were compared with the ion current signals. The optical data indicate that the ions responsible for the chemiluminescence from the HCCI combustion have to be in contact with the sensing electrode for an ion current to start flowing through the measurement circuit. This also means that there will be an offset between the time at which 50% of the fuel mass has burned and 50% of the ion current peak value is reached, which is readily explained by the results presented in the paper.
Technical Paper

Reducing Pressure Fluctuations at High Loads by Means of Charge Stratification in HCCI Combustion with Negative Valve Overlap

2009-06-15
2009-01-1785
Future demands for improvements in the fuel economy of gasoline passenger car engines will require the development and implementation of advanced combustion strategies, to replace, or combine with the conventional spark ignition strategy. One possible strategy is homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) achieved using negative valve overlap (NVO). However, several issues need to be addressed before this combustion strategy can be fully implemented in a production vehicle, one being to increase the upper load limit. One constraint at high loads is the combustion becoming too rapid, leading to excessive pressure-rise rates and large pressure fluctuations (ringing), causing noise. In this work, efforts were made to reduce these pressure fluctuations by using a late injection during the later part of the compression. A more appropriate acronym than HCCI for such combustion is SCCI (Stratified Charge Compression Ignition).
Technical Paper

Testing and Verification of Adaptive Cruise Control and Collision Warning with Brake Support by Using HIL Simulations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0728
This paper presents how hardware in the loop (HIL) simulations have been used for testing during the development of the adaptive cruise control (ACC) and collision warning with brake support (CWBS) functions implemented in the Volvo S80. Both the brake system controller and the controller where the ACC and CWBS functions were implemented were tested. The HIL simulator was used for automated batch simulations in which different controller software releases were analyzed from both system, fail-safe and functional performance perspectives. This paper presents the challenges and the benefits of using HIL simulations when developing distributed active safety functions. Some specific simulation results are analyzed and discussed. The conclusion shows that although it is difficult and time-consuming to develop a complete HIL simulation environment for active safety functions such as ACC and CWBS, the benefits justify the investment.
Technical Paper

Lessons Learned from Model Based Development of a Distributed Embedded Automotive Control System

2004-03-08
2004-01-0713
Model based development promises to facilitate the development of embedded control systems, including design, early verification and validation as well as implementation. Existing tools are beginning to support the development of distributed control systems. There are however still challenges when it comes to integration with mechanics and methodologies for such interdisciplinary systems.
Technical Paper

European Side-markers Effect on Traffic Safety

1999-03-01
1999-01-0091
In 1993 new European legislation regarding side-markers for passenger cars became effective. Volvo requested the TNO-Human Factors Research Institute (HFRI) to investigate the possible safety benefit of this European side-markers configuration. A test panel at TNO- HFRI was used to determine the difference in response time and detection error of drivers, confronted with slides of vehicles with and without the mentioned new vehicle side-marker configuration in several visibility conditions, crossing illumination and different vehicle approach angles. The investigation showed a significant faster vehicle recognition with less detection errors in case the approaching car was equipped with the bright amber side-markers. This improved vehicle conspicuity can be a benefit in crash avoidance, especially when the driver approaches a crossing with complex light environment and reduced visibility.
Technical Paper

On the Underbody Flow of a Simplified Estate

2000-03-06
2000-01-0485
The demand for more energy efficient vehicles is driven by environmental considerations and alternative engine technology. In order to reduce fuel consumption on future vehicles the power needed to propel the car has to be lowered. Hence, considerable efforts are needed to improve the aerodynamics. For a modern vehicle the potential for further improvements on drag is mainly to be found in the underbody region, Howell (1991). This requires more knowledge of the underbody flow and the flow around the wheels. In the present work the flow in the underbody region has been studied using a combination of experiments and calculations to obtain a more comprehensive database. The model chosen for this work was the so called ASMO model from Daimler Benz, which is a well known geometry that is available for the public on the internet. A simple model was preferred since the goal was to study the basic mechanisms behind drag generated by the underbody flow.
Technical Paper

Conceptual Design of Distributed by-Wire Systems

2002-03-04
2002-01-0271
A design method for ultra-dependable control-by-wire systems is presented here. With a top-down approach, exploiting the system's intrinsic redundancy combined with a scalable software redundancy, it is possible to meet dependability requirements cost-effectively. The method starts with the system's functions, which are broken down to the basic elements; task, sensor or actuator. A task graph shows the basic elements interrelationships. Sensor and actuator nodes form a non-redundant hardware architecture. The functional task-graph gives input when allocating software on the node architecture. Tasks are allocated to achieve low inter-node communication and transient fault tolerance using scalable software redundancy. Hardware is added to meet the dependability requirements. Finally, the method describes fault handling and bus scheduling. The proposed method has been used in two cases; a fly-by-wire aircraft and a drive-by-wire car.
Technical Paper

Comparison Between CFD and PIV Measurements in a Passenger Compartment

2000-03-06
2000-01-0977
Numerical simulations of the flow inside a passenger compartment are compared with experimental data obtained from velocity field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Comparisons are made in the front part of the passenger compartment with the air-distribution system operated in a ventilation mode. The sensitivty of the CFD-model to the boundary conditions was investigated and two different turbulence models were tested. Computations and experiments resulted in similar results for the overall flow field, however, rather large differences were found in the vertical spreading of the jet from the dashboard nozzle. The width of the jet was lower in the measurements than in the simulations. This difference is believed to be caused by the high diffusivity obtained when using a k-epsilon model in combination with an unstructured grid.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Hazard Identification Methods in the Automotive Domain

2006-10-16
2006-21-0045
Many automotive electronic systems must be developed using a safety process. A preliminary hazard analysis is a first and an important step in such a process. This experimental study evaluates two methods for hazard identification using an electrical steering column lock system. Both methods are found to be applicable for hazard identification in an automotive context. It is also concluded that the induction with the failure modes method is less time consuming and easier to use than the method based on induction with generic low level hazards. Further, two proposals are presented to improve efficiency and consistency, reuse of generic hazards by component profiles and a domain specific catalogue of vehicle phases.
Technical Paper

A Reference Architecture for Infotainment Systems

2006-10-16
2006-21-0013
Volvo Car Corporation has developed a Reference Architecture for PAG1 Infotainment Systems. A Reference Architecture is an architecture scoping over more than a single system, i.e. an architecture aimed for a family of systems. The Infotainment Reference Architecture has since 2001 been successfully applied for the PAG family which so far covers the infotainment systems of Volvo XC90, Volvo S40/V50, Jaguar XK, Aston Martin DB9 and the brand new Volvo S80. In 1999, the system design departments started up with the clear objective to develop a system solution aiming for the PAG infotainment system family. The work was carried out according to the established development process at Volvo Cars. A year later a discouraging design review was performed. The number of involved functions, the level of function interaction and the distribution of functionalities between ECUs resulted in a non-manageable system solution.
Journal Article

An Evaluation of Different Combustion Strategies for SI Engines in a Multi-Mode Combustion Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-0426
Future pressures to reduce the fuel consumption of passenger cars may require the exploitation of alternative combustion strategies for gasoline engines to replace, or use in combination with the conventional stoichiometric spark ignition (SSI) strategy. Possible options include homogeneous lean charge spark ignition (HLCSI), stratified charge spark ignition (SCSI) and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), all of which are intended to reduce pumping and thermal losses. In the work presented here four different combustion strategies were evaluated using the same engine: SSI, HLCSI, SCSI and HCCI. HLCSI was achieved by early injection and operating the engine lean, close to its stability limits. SCSI was achieved using the spray-guided technique with a centrally placed multi-hole injector and spark-plug. HCCI was achieved using a negative valve overlap to trap hot residuals and thus generate auto-ignition temperatures at the end of the compression stroke.
Technical Paper

Supporting an Automotive Safety Case through Systematic Model Based Development - the EAST-ADL2 Approach

2008-04-14
2008-01-0127
Automotive electronic systems are becoming safety related causing a need for more systematic and stringent approaches for demonstrating the functional safety. The safety case consists of an argumentation, supported by evidence, of why the system is safe to operate in a given context. It is dependent on referencing and aggregating information which is part of the EAST-ADL2, an architecture description language for automotive embedded systems. This paper explores the possibilities of integrating the safety case metamodel with the EAST-ADL2, enabling safety case development in close connection to the system model. This is done by including a safety case object in EAST-ADL2, and defining the external and internal relations.
Technical Paper

The Volvo 5-Cylinder Engine with 4-Valve Technology - A New Member of Volvos Modular Engine Family

1991-09-01
911906
During 1991 Volvo Car Corporation has introduced the new Volvo 850 GLT model featuring front wheel drive with transverse installation of the engine and gearbox. The powertrain; consists of a new in-line five-cylinder engine in combination with a four speed electronically controlled automatic gearbox or a five speed manual gearbox. The engine features DOHC 20 valves, V-VIS (Volvo Variable Induction System), well tuned exhaust system and microprocessor controlled engine management systems. The engine was designed and developed as a new member of Volvo's modular engine family. The first member was the in-line six-cylinder engine B6304F [1] introduced in 1990. The modular engines have a large number of identical components and the major components are machined in common transfer lines which makes the manufacturing process highly rational and cost-effective.
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