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Technical Paper

The Rand-Cam Engine: A Pistonless Four Stroke Engine

1994-03-01
940518
The Rand-Cam engine is a positive displacement machine, operating on a four stroke cycle, which consists of a rotor with multiple axial vanes forming combustion chambers as the rotor and vanes rotate in a cam shaped housing. The cam housing, consisting of two “half-housings” or stators, contains a toroidal trough of varying depth machined into each stator. The two stators are phased so that the shallowest point on one trough corresponds to the deepest on the other. A set of six vanes, able to move axially through machined holes in the rotor, traverses the troughs creating six captured zones per side. These zones vary in volume with rotor rotation. Since each trough has two deep sections and two shallow sections with ramps in between, full four stroke operation is obtained between each pair of vanes in each trough, corresponding to twelve power “strokes” per revolution.
Technical Paper

Basic Design of the Rand Cam Engine

1993-03-01
930062
The Rand Cam engine is a novel design which avoids the use of pistons in favor of a cavity of varying size and shape. A set of vanes protrudes from a rotor into a circular trough in a stator. The vanes seal to the walls and base of the trough, which is of varying depth, and progress around the trough with rotation of the rotor. These vanes therefore pass through the rotor and are constrained to move parallel to the rotational axis. Intake and exhaust processes occur through ports in the stator wall which are revealed by the passing vanes. Advantages of the basic design include an absence of valves, reduction in reciprocating masses, presence of an integral flywheel in the rotor and strong fluid movement akin a swirl induced by the relative velocity between the rotor and stator.
Technical Paper

A Model for a Planetary - CVT Mechanism: Analysis and Synthesis

1993-03-01
930065
This paper describes the strategy for engineering design, modeling, and analysis of a planetary - CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission) system. The uniqueness of this mechanism arrangement resides in the combination of features associated to two conventional systems, namely a planetary gear train and a CVT pulley system, acting as a power circulation control unit. The pulley system features a manually activated control over the variable pitch ratios of the CVT, by means of which the overall system input/output velocity and power ratios can be controlled according the operational requirements. By using the belt drive as a feedback control unit (as opposed to the main driveline), one of the major problems or limitations of conventional CVT arrangements is overcome, namely the belt capacity of the system. Specifically, the output torque obtained through the planetary output shaft is greater than the torque circulating through the pulleys.
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