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Aircraft Humidification

2016-10-21
WIP
AIR1609B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
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FAULT ISOLATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORTS

1977-08-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1266
This AIR outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. However, the specific concern applies only to use with Environmental Control Systems in commercial transports. In particular, automatic Built In Test Equipment (BITE) with manual initiation and software programs are covered as systems already in use.
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THE ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM (AECS) COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR STEADY STATE ANALYSIS AND PRELIMINARY SYSTEM SIZING

1986-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706A
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated "company proprietary" and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
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The Advanced Environmental Control System (AECS) Computer Program for Steady State Analysis and Preliminary System Sizing

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706B
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated “company proprietary” and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
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Spacecraft Life Support Systems

2012-10-15
CURRENT
AIR1168/14A
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management.
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Spacecraft Life Support Systems

1994-01-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/14
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management.
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Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

2017-02-07
CURRENT
AIR1812B
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
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Environmental Control Systems Life Cycle Cost

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1812A
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
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ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS LIFE CYCLE COST

1985-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1812
This report contains background information on life cycle cost elements and key ECS cost factors. Elements of life cycle costs are defined from initial design phases through operational use. Information on how ECS designs affect overall aircraft cost and information on primary factors affecting ECS costs are discussed. Key steps or efforts for comparing ECS designs on the basis of LCC are outlined. Brief descriptions of two computer programs for estimating LCC of total aircraft programs and their use to estimate ECS LCC, are included.
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ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM TRANSIENT ANALYSIS COMPUTER PROGRAM (EASY)

1994-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1823
The Environmental Control Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. Development of this computer program initially was sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. (See References 1, 2, 3, and 4.) It provides techniques for determination of steady state and dynamic (transient) ECS performance, and of control system stability; and for synthesis of optimal ECS control systems. The program is available from the U.S. Air Force, or as a proprietary commercial version. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
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Engineering Analysis System (EASY) Computer Program for Dynamic Analysis of Aircraft ECS

1996-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1823A
The Engineering Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. It provides techniques for analysis of steady-state and dynamic (transient) environmental control system (ECS) performance, control system stability, and for synthesis of optimal ECS. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
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The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP987A
The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) to review the problem of moisture in avionics equipment, (2) to outline methods for correcting conditions of excess moisture in existing avionics installations, and (3) to recommend design practices for new avionics cooling system installations which will minimize the adverse effects of moisture.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

2010-06-17
CURRENT
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
Standard

TEMPERATURE CONTROL EQUIPMENT, AUTOMATIC, AIRPLANE CABIN

1956-03-15
HISTORICAL
ARP89B
This recommended practice covers automatic cabin temperature control systems of the following types for pressurized and unpressurized cabins: Type I - Proportioning. Type II - On-Off, or Cycling. Type III - Floating, including modifications thereof.
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TEMPERATURE CONTROL EQUIPMENT, AUTOMATIC, AIRCRAFT COMPARTMENT

1992-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP89C
The recommendations of this ARP are primarily intended to be applicable to temperature control of compartments, occupied or unoccupied, of civil aircraft whose prime function is the transporting of passengers or cargo. The recommendations will apply, however, to a much broader category of civil and military aircraft where automatic temperature control systems are applicable.
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