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Technical Paper

Wall-scale Reaction Models in Diesel Particulate Filters

2007-04-16
2007-01-1130
Following the successful market introduction of diesel particulate filters (DPFs), this class of emission control devices is expanding to include additional functionalities such as gas species oxidation (such as CO, HC and NO), storage phenomena (such as NOx and NH3 storage) to the extent that we should today refer not to DPFs but to Multifunctional Reactor Separators. This trend poses many challenges for the modeling of such systems since the complexity of the coupled reaction and transport phenomena makes any direct general numerical approach to require unacceptably high computing times. These multi-functionalities are urgently needed to be incorporated into system level emission control simulation tools in a robust and computationally efficient manner. In the present paper we discuss a new framework and its application for the computationally efficient implementation of such phenomena.
Technical Paper

The Optimum Cell Density for Wall-Flow Monolithic Filters: Effects of Filter Permeability, Soot Cake Structure and Ash Loading

2004-03-08
2004-01-1133
A major challenge in the development of diesel filter systems is the selection of the appropriate filter medium in terms of its geometric configuration (cell density, wall thickness) and its physical properties (porosity, pore size). This selection aims to achieve minimization of the filter pressure drop as well as more efficient filter regeneration. The aim of the present work is to provide engineering criteria to support the design and selection of suitably sized wall-flow monolithic filters for diesel particulate control.
Technical Paper

Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters

2008-04-14
2008-01-0623
A new platform of advanced ceramic composite filter materials for diesel particulate matter and exhaust gas emission control has been developed. These materials exhibit high porosity, narrow pore-size distribution, robust thermo-mechanical strength, and are extruded into high cell density honeycomb structures for wall-flow filter applications. These new high porosity filters provide a structured filtration surface area and a highly connected wall pore space which is fully accessible for multi-phase catalytic reactions. The cross-linked microstructure (CLM™) pore architecture provides a large surface area to host high washcoat/catalyst loadings, such as those required for advanced multi-functional catalysts (4-way converter applications).
Technical Paper

Growth and Restructuring Phenomena of Deposits in Particulate Filters

2018-04-03
2018-01-1265
As use of Particulate Filters (PFs) is growing not only for diesel but also for gasoline powered vehicles, the need for better understanding of deposit structure, growth dynamics and evolution arises. In the present paper we address a number of deposit growth and restructuring phenomena within particulate filters with the aim to improve particulate filter soot load estimation. To this end we investigate the dynamic factors that quantify the amount of particles that are stored within the wall and the restructuring of soot deposits. We demonstrate that particle accumulation inside the porous wall is dynamically controlled by the dimensionless Peclet number and provide a procedure for the estimation of parameters of interest such as the loaded filter wall permeability, the wall-stored soot mass at the onset of cake filtration.
Technical Paper

Microstructural Aspects of Soot Oxidation in Diesel Particulate Filters

2004-03-08
2004-01-0693
Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) behavior depends strongly on the microstructural properties of the deposited soot aggregates. In the past the issue of the growth process of soot deposits in honeycomb ceramic filters has been addressed under non-reactive conditions and the influence of the filter operating conditions has been defined in terms of the dimensionless Peclet number. In the present work appropriate soot cake microstructural descriptors are studied under reactive conditions for different oxidation modes. To this end the effect of deposit microstructure on the soot oxidation kinetics is investigated. Different microstructural models for the reacting soot deposit are examined in a unified fashion and a generalized constitutive equation is obtained, describing several modes of microstructure evolution (shrinking layer, shrinking density, discrete columnar and continuous columnar).
Technical Paper

A Multi-Reactor Assembly for Screening of Diesel Particulate Filters

2006-04-03
2006-01-0874
In this paper a fast DPF screening procedure is proposed using small-scale filter samples of different technologies in a well-controlled environment but under realistic engine exhaust conditions. The DPF samples are evaluated in a specially built Multi-Reactor Assembly (MRA) with respect to their flow resistance, filtration efficiency, soot loading behavior, soot oxidation behavior, as well as their ash induced ageing behavior.
Technical Paper

A Selective Particle Size Sampler Suitable for Biological Exposure Studies of Diesel Particulate

2006-04-03
2006-01-1075
The objective of this study is the design, construction and evaluation of a Selective Particle Size (SPS) sampler able to provide continuous delivery of diesel soot particles of specific size ranges. The design of the sampler combines principles of aerosol transport phenomena and separation technologies. Particles smaller than a given size are removed from the exhaust by diffusional deposition, while removal of particles above a given size is achieved by low pressure inertial impaction. The main application of the developed sampler is the exposure of biological samples such as cell and tissue cultures to selected sizes of diesel exhaust particles. By applying the SPS sampler to diesel exhaust it is demonstrated that it is possible to obtain two aerosol streams with widely separated particle size distributions (of nanometric dimensions), suitable for biological exposure studies.
Technical Paper

Study on the Filter Structure of SiC-DPF with Gas Permeability for Emission Control

2005-04-11
2005-01-0578
The pore structure of DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) is one of the key factors in contributing the fuel consumption and the emission control performance of a vehicle. The pressure loss of mini samples (1 in. in diameter, 2 in. in length) with various pore structures was measured at relatively low filtration velocity (< 5 cm/sec). Then the obtained data were evaluated by using an index of “permeability”. As a result, among the parameters which characterize the pore structure, it was found that the size of the pore diameter and the sharpness of pore distribution were the most contributing factors in reducing pressure loss which in turn is related to the fuel consumption performance when the cell structure was fixed. On the other hand, it was found that the gas permeability was not affected significantly by any parameter when the catalyst was coated because the coating caused a broadening of the pore distribution.
Technical Paper

Optimized Filter Design and Selection Criteria for Continuously Regenerating Diesel Particulate Traps

1999-03-01
1999-01-0468
Upcoming (2005) particulate matter standards for diesel powered vehicles are likely to require the deployment of aftertreatment devices, such as particulate filters to ensure emissions compliance. A major challenge in the development of diesel filter systems has been the achievement of filter regeneration by the oxidation of the collected particulate matter in a reliable and cost-effective manner. Recently the emergence of the so-called continuously regenerating trap (CRT™) in conjunction with the future availability of very low-sulphur diesel fuel, represents a promising solution to the diesel particulate control problem. In the present study, design and selection criteria are devised, regarding the sizing of wall flow diesel particulate filters for application in CRT™ systems, employing a range of analytical and 3-D CFD tools validated against experimental data.
Technical Paper

Periodically Reversed Flow Regeneration of Diesel Particulate Traps

1999-03-01
1999-01-0469
Diesel particulate filter regeneration (through oxidation of the collected soot particles) is not currently possible under all engine operating conditions without additional external thermal energy. The exploitation of the autothermal properties of the reverse flow reactor has been suggested to reduce further the soot ignition temperature and hereby is studied for the periodically reversed flow regeneration of soot particulate filters, with the aid of a mathematical model for the regeneration process, validated against experimental data. The numerical results confirm the capability of the new technique to effectively succeed where conventional regeneration fails, extending thus the operating limits of already practiced regeneration techniques (thermal or catalyst-assisted) and setting the stage for the construction of an industrial prototype.
Technical Paper

Study on Catalyzed-DPF for Improving the Continuous Regeneration Performance and Fuel Economy

2007-04-16
2007-01-0919
It is a big challenge how to satisfy both the purification of exhaust gas and the decrease of fuel penalty, that is, carbon-dioxide emission. Regarding the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) applied in the diesel after-treatment system, it must be effective for lowering the fuel penalty to prolong the interval and reduce the frequency of the DPF regeneration operation. This can be achieved by a DPF that has high Particulate Matter (PM) mass limit and high PM oxidation performance that is enough to regenerate the DPF continuously during the normal running operation. In this study, the examination of the pore structure of the wall of a DPF that could expand the continuous regeneration region in the engine operation map was carried out. Several porous materials with a wide range of pore structure were prepared and coated with a Mixed Oxide Catalyst (MOC). The continuous regeneration performance was evaluated under realistic conditions in the exhaust of a diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Soot Oxidation Kinetics in Diesel Particulate Filters

2007-04-16
2007-01-1129
Direct catalytic soot oxidation is expected to become an important component of future diesel particulate emission control systems. The development of advanced Catalytic Diesel Particulate Filters (CDPFs relies on the interplay of chemistry and geometry in order to enhance soot-catalyst proximity. An extensive set of well-controlled experiments has been performed to provide direct catalytic soot oxidation rates in CDPFs employing small-scale side-stream sample exposure. The experiments are analyzed with a state-of-the-art diesel particulate filter simulator and a set of kinetic parameters are derived for direct catalytic soot oxidation by fuel-borne catalysts as well as by catalytic coatings. The influence of soot-catalyst proximity, on catalytic soot oxidation is found to be excellently described by the so-called Two-Layer model, developed previously by the authors.
Technical Paper

Multi-Functional Reactor for Emission Reduction of Future Diesel Engine Exhaust

2009-04-20
2009-01-0287
Future diesel emission control systems have to effectively operate under non-conventional low-temperature combustion engine operating conditions. In this work the research and development efforts for the realization of a Multi-Functional catalyst Reactor (MFR) for the exhaust of the upcoming diesel engines is presented. This work is based on recent advances in catalytic nano-structured materials synthesis and coating techniques. Different catalytic functionalities have been carefully distributed in the filter substrate microstructure for maximizing the direct and indirect (NO2-assisted) soot oxidation rate, the HC and CO conversion efficiency as well as the filtration efficiency. Moreover, a novel filter design has been applied to enable internal heat recovery capability by the implementation of heat exchange between the outlet and the inlet to the filter flow paths.
Technical Paper

A Mobile Laboratory for On-board and Ambient Level Emissions Measurement

2008-04-14
2008-01-0756
Although engine emissions per vehicle have been reduced for twenty years with technical developments in the fields of engine, after-treatment technologies and fuels the urban air pollution problem still exists in many cities around the world. Forthcoming emission regulations will require further development of new complex technologies to reach low emissions. On-board driving assessment of such technologies offers significant advantages in the development phase of novel emission reduction. In this paper we present the design, development and commissioning of a mobile laboratory able to monitor on-board along the exhaust line gaseous and particulate pollutants as well as measure these pollutants in the ambient environment around the vehicle.
Journal Article

Micro-Simulation of NO-NO2 Transport and Reaction in the Wall of a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter

2008-04-14
2008-01-0442
Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filters (CDPFs) continue to be an important emission control solution and are now also expanding to include additional functionalities such as gas species oxidation (such as CO, hydrocarbons and NO) and even storage phenomena (such as NOx and NH3 storage). Therefore an in depth understanding of the coupled transport - reaction phenomena occurring inside a CDPF wall can provide useful guidance for catalyst placement and improved accuracy over idealized effective medium 1-D and 0-D models for CDPF operation. In the present work a previously developed 3-D simulation framework for porous materials is applied to the case of NO-NO2 turnover in a granular silicon carbide CDPF. The detailed geometry of the CDPF wall is digitally reconstructed and micro-simulation methods are used to obtain detailed descriptions of the concentration and transport of the NO and NO2 species in the reacting environment of the soot cake and the catalyst coated pores of the CDPF wall.
Journal Article

Catalytic Nano-structured Materials for Next Generation Diesel Particulate Filters

2008-04-14
2008-01-0417
The increasing need for controlled diesel engine emissions and the strict regulations in the abatement of diesel exhaust products lead to an ever increasing use of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) in OEM applications. The periodic regeneration of DPFs (oxidation of soot particles) demands temperatures that rarely appear during engine operation. It is therefore necessary to employ direct or indirect catalytic measures. In the present work, the development and synthesis via aerosol-based routes, of nanostructured base metal oxides for direct soot oxidation, along with their characterization and their evaluation in engine exhaust is described. The synthesized powders were characterized with respect to their phase composition and morphology. XRD, SEM and TEM analysis have shown the nanostructured character of the powders, while Raman spectroscopy was employed for the preliminary characterization of the materials surface chemistry.
Technical Paper

Advanced Catalyst Coatings for Diesel Particulate Filters

2008-04-14
2008-01-0483
Novel catalytic coatings with a variety of methods based on conventional and novel synthesis routes are developed for Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs). The developed catalytic composition exhibits significant direct soot oxidation as evaluated by reacting mixtures of diesel soot and catalyst powders in a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA). The catalyst composition was further deposited on oxide and non-oxide porous filter structures that were evaluated on an engine bench with respect to their filtration efficiency, pressure drop behavior and direct soot oxidation activity under realistic conditions. The effect of the catalyst amount on the filtration efficiency of non-oxide filters was also investigated. Evaluation of the indirect soot oxidation was conducted on non-oxide catalytic filters coated with precious metal.
Technical Paper

A Methodology for the Fast Evaluation of the Effect of Ash Aging on the Diesel Particulate Filter Performance

2009-04-20
2009-01-0630
Establishing a certain maintenance-free time period regarding modern diesel exhaust emission control systems is of major importance nowadays. One of the most serious problems Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) manufacturers face concerning system's durability is the performance deterioration due to the filter aging because of the accumulation of the ash particles. The evaluation of the effect of the ash aging on the filter performance is a time and cost consuming task that slows down the process of manufacturing innovative filter structures and designs. In this work we present a methodology for producing filter samples aged by accumulating ash produced by the controlled pyrolysis of oil-fuel solutions. Such ash particles bear morphological (size) and compositional similarity to ash particles collected from engine aged DPFs. The ash particles obtained are compared to those from real engine operation.
Technical Paper

Spatial Non-Uniformities in Diesel Particulate Trap Regeneration

2001-03-05
2001-01-0908
Diesel particulate trap regeneration is a complex process involving the interaction of phenomena at several scales. A hierarchy of models for the relevant physicochemical processes at the different scales of the problem (porous wall, filter channel, entire trap) is employed to obtain a rigorous description of the process in a multidimensional context. The final model structure is validated against experiments, resulting in a powerful tool for the computer-aided study of the regeneration behavior. In the present work we employ this tool to address the effect of various spatial non-uniformities on the regeneration characteristics of diesel particulate traps. Non-uniformities may include radial variations of flow, temperature and particulate concentration at the filter inlet, as well as variations of particulate loading. In addition, we study the influence of the distribution of catalytic activity along the filter wall.
Technical Paper

Microstructural Properties of Soot Deposits in Diesel Particulate Traps

2002-03-04
2002-01-1015
As demand for wall-flow Diesel particulate filters (DPF) increases, accurate predictions of DPF behavior, and in particular of the accumulated soot mass, under a wide range of operating conditions become important. This effort is currently hampered by a lack of a systematic knowledge of the accumulated particulate deposit microstructural properties. In this work, an experimental and theoretical study of the growth process of soot cakes in honeycomb ceramic filters is presented. Particular features of the present work are the application of first- principles measurement and simulation methodology for accurate determination of soot cake packing density and permeability, and their systematic dependence on the filter operating conditions represented by the Peclet number for mass transfer. The proposed measurement methodology has been also validated using various filters on different Diesel engines.
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