Refine Your Search

Search Results

Technical Paper

Effect of Tumble Strength on Combustion and Exhaust Emissions in a Single-Cylinder, Four-Valve, Spark-Ignition Engine

1998-02-23
981044
Direct flame imaging and pressure analysis were applied to the combustion of gasoline and compressed natural gas (CNG) in a single-cylinder, four-valve spark-ignition engine equipped with optical access via quartz windows in the cylinder liner and piston crown. Tests were performed at three engine speed/load conditions and at equivalence ratios of 1.0, 0.9 and 0.8. The four-valve head incorporated two different port geometries, with and without metal sleeves to deflect the intake air flow, in order to investigate the effect of tumble strength on combustion and engine-out emissions of unburned hydrocarbons and NOx. The results showed that sleeving of the intake ports produced a significant increase in IMEP and a reduction in CoV IMEP for both CNG and gasoline, due to the greatly reduced bum duration.
Technical Paper

Measurements of the Lubricant Film Thickness in the Cylinder of a Firing Diesel Engine Using LIF

1998-10-19
982435
A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to obtain measurements of the instantaneous lubricant film thickness in the piston-cylinder assembly of a firing single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine. Measurements were made at top-dead-centre (TDC), mid-stroke and bottom-dead-centre (BDC) position by means of three fibre optic probes inserted into the cylinder liner and mounted flush with its surface. Following extensive repeatability tests, the cycle-averaged lubricant film thickness was estimated for different multi-grade oils as a function of engine speed, load and temperature. The results quantified the dependence of the film thickness ahead, under and behind the piston rings on oil chemistry and viscometric properties, thus confirming the important role of the LIF technique in the development and formulation of new engine oils.
Technical Paper

Cold-start Measurements of the Lubricant Film Thickness in the Cylinder of a Firing Diesel Engine

1998-10-19
982436
Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was used in the cylinder liner of a firing single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine to characterise the development of the lubricant film during the first 200 engine cycles under cold-start conditions. The results have provided information on the rate of oil film development which has proved to be a highly unsteady process due to the complicated oil transport processes through the ring-pack.
Technical Paper

Droplet Velocity/Size and Mixture Distribution in a Single-Cylinder Four-Valve Spark-Ignition Engine

1998-02-01
981186
Laser Doppler velocimetry, phase Doppler anemometry and Mie scattering were applied to a single-cylinder, four-valve, spark-ignition gasoline research engine equipped with a fully transparent liner and piston, to obtain information about the tumble flow and the droplet size and velocity distributions during induction and compression, for lean air/fuel mixture ratios of 17.5 and 24 and with closed-valve and open-valve fuel injection. The mixture distribution obtained with the two injection strategies was correlated with flame images, pressure analysis and exhaust emissions which confirmed the advantages of combining open-valve injection with tumble to allow stable and efficient engine operation at an air/fuel ratio of 24 through charge stratification and faster flame growth.
Technical Paper

Flow and Combustion in a Four-Valve, Spark-Ignition Optical Engine

1994-03-01
940475
The in-cylinder flow during induction and compression in the pentroof chamber of a four-valve, single-cylinder, spark-ignition optical engine was quantified by LDV and correlated with combustion development especially under lean mixture conditions. The tumble-generating capacity of the cylinder head was first characterised by a tumble adaptor under steady flow conditions and, subsequently, enhanced by two sleeves introduced into the intake ports which generated a stronger tumbling motion.
Technical Paper

An Approach to Charge Stratification in Lean-Burn, Spark- Ignition Engines

1994-10-01
941878
A constant-volume combustion chamber was used to examine injection of a small quantity of slightly rich fuel/air mixture towards the spark plug around the time of ignition, in an overall very lean mixture rotating at velocities representative of modern spark-ignition engines. The results show that it is possible to achieve 100% ignitability with overall air-fuel ratios in excess of 50 and much faster burn rates than those with initially homogenous mixtures of the same equivalence ratio with high swirl and turbulence. The advantages of this method of local charge stratification have been demonstrated in terms of both pressure measurements and shadowgraphs of the early flame development while the transient characteristics of the injected rich mixture at the spark plug gap were monitored by a fast flame ionization detector.
Technical Paper

Imaging of Lean Premixed Flames in Spark-Ignition Engines

1994-10-01
942052
Two optical single-cylinder spark-ignition engines equipped with two- and four-valve cylinder heads were used to examine the flow and flame interaction under lean mixture conditions. Images of the developing flame under quiescent, swirl, low tumble and high tumble flow conditions corresponding to a wide range of mean velocity and turbulence levels around the time of ignition were obtained with an image-intensified CCD camera using the light radiated by the flame and the flow in the vicinity of the spark plug was quantified by laser Doppler velocimetry. In the case of the tumbling flow, the flame images were software-processed to allow estimation of the total flame area, the displacement of its centre as a function of crank angle and their correlation with the cylinder pressure.
Technical Paper

Development of a Piston-Ring Lubrication Test-Rig and Investigation of Boundary Conditions for Modelling Lubricant Film Properties

1995-10-01
952468
A test-rig has been developed to simulate under idealised conditions the lubricating action between the piston-ring and the cylinder-liner in reciprocating engines. Complications arising in production engine piston-assemblies such as lubricant starvation, ring and piston dynamics, thermal and elastic deformations and blowby can thus be avoided so that the lubricant film characteristics are examined in isolation. The lubricant film thickness and friction at the piston-ring/liner interface were simultaneously measured throughout the stroke as a function of speed and load and compared with the solution of the Reynolds equation for a range of boundary conditions. The examined conditions included the Swift-Stieber (Reynolds), the separation and limiting cases of the Floberg and the Coyne & Elrod boundary conditions using a numerically efficient general purpose program.
Technical Paper

Effect of Fuel Injection Processes on the Structure of Diesel Sprays

1997-02-24
970799
A diesel spray model has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained for different injection and surrounding gas conditions to allow investigation of the relative importance of the different physical processes occurring during the spray development. The model is based on the Eulerian-Lagrangian approximation and the Navier-Stokes equations, simulating the gas motion, are numerically solved on a collocated non-uniform curvilinear non-orthogonal grid, while the spray equation is solved numerically using a Lagrangian particle tracking method. The injection conditions are determined by another recently developed model calculating the flow in the fuel injection system, the sac volume and injection holes area which accounts for the details of the injection velocity, the fuel injection rate per injection hole and occurrence of hole cavitation. Thus, differences between the sprays from inclined multihole injectors can be simulated and analysed.
Technical Paper

Transient Characteristics of Multi-Hole Diesel Sprays

1990-02-01
900480
The spatial and temporal characteristics of a diesel spray injected into the atmosphere through a multi-hole nozzle used in small DI Diesel engines have been investigated by laser techniques as a function of pump speed and load. The results showed that spray tip penetration and velocity depend on injection frequency rather than injected volume and the spray is asymmetric during the early and main part of the injection period. In the time/space domain different structures have been identified within the injection period, with the early injection period characterized by a well atomized cloud of droplets, the main period by the spray head and a dense core and the late injection period by the disintegrating dense core and the spray tail. IN DIRECT-INJECTION DIESEL ENGINES for passenger cars, fuel is injected through multi-hole nozzles at high pressure to promote mixing with the rapidly swirling air inside the combustion chamber.
Technical Paper

Swirl Center Precession in Engine Flows

1987-02-01
870370
The origin and development of swirl center precession in engine flows has been investigated in a steady flow rig, with and without a porous plate simulating a stationary piston, and in a model engine motored at 200rpm; swirl, in all cases, was generated by means of 60° vanes located in the axisymmetric inlet port. The swirl center performs a helical motion that originates as an instability in the forced-vortex core from its interaction with the axial flow at a free stagnation point and develops in the engine from the piston towards the cylinder head; an opposite trend has been observed in the steady flow case with the open-ended cylinder. In the ensemble-averaged measurements, swirl center precession has been identified by the increased tangential velocity fluctuations around the off-centre zero swirl velocity.
Technical Paper

Visualization of Flow/Flame Interaction in a Constant-Volume Combustion Chamber

1993-03-01
930868
A visualization study using shadowgraphy was performed in an optically-accessible, cylindrical constant-volume combustion chamber to identify the mechanism of flow/flame interaction in spark-ignited, lean propane-air mixtures. The effect of the flow on flame initiation and propagation was examined by varying the pre-ignition mean flow and turbulence within a range typical of modern four-valve spark-ignition (SI) engines, as well as the spark plug orientation relative to the mean flow. The initial flame development was quantified in terms of 2-D images which provided information about the projected flame area and the displacement of the flame center as a function of flow conditions, time from the spark initiation and spark plug orientation. The results showed that high mean flow velocities and turbulence levels can shorten combustion duration in lean mixtures and that the positioning of the ground electrode can have an important effect on the initial kernel formation.
Technical Paper

Flow and Combustion in a Hydra Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

1991-02-01
910177
Measurements of flow, spray, combustion and performance characteristics are reported for a Hydra direct-injection diesel, based on the Ford 2.5 L, engine and equipped with a variable-swirl port, a unit fuel injector and optical access through the liner and piston. The results provide links between the pre-combustion and combustion flow and, at the same time, between purpose-built single-cylinder optical engines and multi-cylinder production engines of nearly identical combustion chamber geometry. In particular, the spray penetration was found to depend on engine speed, rather than load, with velocities up to around 260 m/s at atmospheric pressure and temperature which are reduced by a factor of 2.5 under operating conditions and seem to be unaffected by swirl. The duration of combustion was reduced with increasing swirl and ignition delay increased linearly with engine speed.
Technical Paper

Coolant Flow in the Cylinder Head/Block of the Ford 2.5L DI Diesel Engine

1991-02-01
910300
Local measurements of the mean and rms velocities have been obtained by laser Doppler velocimetry in the coolant passages of a transparent model of a Ford 2.5L diesel cylinder head and block at a steady flowrate of 6.83 × 10-4 M3/s. The simulation of the coolant fluid by a mixture of hydrocarbon fluids at a predetermined constant temperature allowed accurate matching of the refractive index to that of the acrylic model, thus providing optical access for LDV measurements of the internal flow in sensitive areas where cooling is essential to prevent metal-fatigue failure. The results were obtained in sufficient detail to allow further validation of CFD coolant flow models.
Technical Paper

Correlation between Spark Ignition Characteristics and Flame Development in a Constant-Volume Combustion Chamber

1992-02-01
920413
The electrical characteristics of transistorized coil ignition (TCI) and capacitor discharge ignition (CDI) systems were investigated in spark-ignited quiescent and flowing propane/air mixtures within an optically-accessible, cylindrical constant-volume combustion chamber. Under quiescent flow conditions, the initial pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio of the mixture as well as the spark gap width and geometry were varied systematically in order to examine the relationship between ignition characteristics and flame initiation and development. The effect of the flow in the spark gap on the electrical characteristics of the ignition system, mixture ignitability and flame development was also examined by varying the pre-ignition mean flow and turbulence as well as the spark plug orientation relative to the mean flow.
Technical Paper

Gaseous Simulation of Diesel-Type Sprays in a Motored Engine

1989-02-01
890793
The effect of fuel injection on the flow and the spray/swirl and spray/piston interactions in direct-injection diesel engines have been investigated by simulating diesel sprays with gaseous jet(s) injected through centrally located, single- and multi-hole nozzles into the quiescent and swirling air of a motored engine running at 200rpm and incorporating a flat piston and a re-entrant piston-bowl. The axisymmetric velocity field with and without ‘fuel’ injection was characterised by laser velocimetry near TDC of compression in terms of spatially-resolved ensemble-averaged axial and swirl velocities, the ‘fuel’ concentration field was quantified by laser Rayleigh scattering and the two-dimensional flow was visualised by gated still photography using hollow microballoons as light scatterers.
Technical Paper

Tumbling Motion: A Mechanism for Turbulence Enhancement in Spark-Ignition Engines

1990-02-01
900060
The ability of certain induction systems to enhance turbulence levels at the time of ignition, through formation of long-lived tumbling vortices on the plane of the valve and cylinder axes, has been investigated in a two-valve spark-ignition engine by rotating the intake port at 90° and 45° to the orientation of production directed ports. Detailed measurements of the three velocity components, obtained by laser velocimetry, revealed that the 90° port generated a pure tumble motion, with a maximum tumbling vortex ratio of 1.5 at 295°CA, zero swirl, and 42% turbulence enhancement relative to the standard configuration, while the 45° port gave rise to a combined tumble/swirl structure with a maximum tumbling vortex ratio of 0.5 at 285°CA, swirl ratio of 1.0 at TDC, and turbulence enhancement of 24%. The implications of the two types of flow structures for combustion are discussed.
Technical Paper

Effect of Inlet Parameters on the Flow Characteristics in a Four-Stroke Model Engine

1982-02-01
820750
The flow structure in a four-stroke model engine motored at 200 rpm with a compression ratio of 3.5 has been investigated. Ensemble-averaged axial and swirl mean and rms velocities have been obtained by laser-Doppler anemometry downstream of an axisymmetrically located single valve with 30 and 60 degree seat angles and various lifts, with and without induction swirl. In all cases, the intake-generated flow structure in the axial plane disappears by the time the inlet valve closes and results in nearly homogeneous turbulence during compression with levels of 0.5–0.7 times the mean piston speed. The swirling flow, however, which is induced by means of vanes, persists through the compression stroke, evolving from a spiralling motion early during intake into solid body type of rotation near TDC of compression, with associated swirl ratios increasing with valve lift.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Flow Field in Four-Stroke Model Engines

1984-10-01
841360
Ensemble-averaged and in-cycle axial and swirl velocities have been measured by laser Doppler anemometry in the three-dimensional flow field of a four-stroke model engine motored at 200 rpm with a compression ratio of 6.7 and various cylinder head and piston geometries. The inlet configurations comprised an axisymmetric port with a shrouded valve and an off-centre port with two valve and swirl generating vane geometries. The piston configurations comprised flat, cylindrical and re-entrant axisymmetric piston-bowls. The results indicate that with the off-centre port a complex vortical flow pattern is generated during induction, which later either collapses in the absence of induction swirl or is transformed into a single rotating vortex in the transverse plane when swirl is present. The axisymmetric port with the shrouded valve gives rise to a double vortex structure and higher turbulence levels at TDC of compression compared to the off-centre port.
Technical Paper

The Application on Laser Rayleigh Scattering to a Reciprocating Model Engine

1984-02-01
840376
The Rayleigh light scattering technique has been used to quantify the mean and fluctuating concentration of a passive scalar used to simulate fuel injection in a reciprocating, two-stroke model engine motored at 200 rpm in the absence of compression. The transient concentration field, which results from injection of Freon-12 vapour through the centre of an axisymmetrically located permanently open valve, has been investigated for injection timings of 40 deg. before and at top-dead-centre as a function of spatial position and crank angle. The purpose-built Rayleigh system, with gated digital data acquisition and software dust particle filtering, was first evaluated in a Freon-12 free jet by comparing results to those obtained with a sampling probe.
X