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Standard

Use of Terms Yield Strength and Yield Point

2002-02-27
HISTORICAL
J450_200202
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to describe the terms yield strength and yield point. Included are definitions for both terms and recommendations for their use and application.
Standard

Use of Terms Yield Strength and Yield Point

1984-06-01
HISTORICAL
J450_198406
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to describe the terms yield strength and yield point. Included are definitions for both terms and recommendations for their use and application.
Standard

Use of Terms Yield Strength and Yield Point

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J450_199106
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to describe the terms yield strength and yield point. Included are definitions for both terms and recommendations for their use and application.
Standard

Use of Terms Yield Strength and Yield Point

2017-10-10
CURRENT
J450_201710
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to describe the terms yield strength and yield point. Included are definitions for both terms and recommendations for their use and application.
Standard

Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated Wrought Steels

1978-11-01
HISTORICAL
J413B_197811
The figures in this SAE Information Report illustrate the principle that, regardless of composition, steels of the same cross-sectional hardness produced by tempering after through hardening will have approximately the same longitudinal tensile strength at room temperature. Figure 1 shows the relation between hardness and longitudinal tensile strength of 0.30 to 0.50% carbon steels in the fully hardened and tempered, as rolled, normalized, and annealed conditions. Figure 2 showing the relation between longitudinal tensile strength and yield strength, and Figure 3 illustrating longitudinal tensile strength versus reduction of area, are typical of steels in the quenched and tempered condition. Figure 3 shows the direct relationship between ductility and hardness and illustrates the fact that the reduction of area decreases as hardness increases, and that, for a given hardness, the reduction of area is generally higher for alloy steels than for plain carbon steels.
Standard

Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated Wrought Steels

1990-06-01
HISTORICAL
J413_199006
The figures in this SAE Information Report illustrate the principle that, regardless of composition, steels of the same cross-sectional hardness produced by tempering after through hardening will have approximately the same longitudinal tensile strength at room temperature. Figure 1 shows the relation between hardness and longitudinal tensile strength of 0.30 to 0.50% carbon steels in the fully hardened and tempered, as rolled, normalized, and annealed conditions. Figure 2 showing the relation between longitudinal tensile strength and yield strength, and Figure 3 illustrating longitudinal tensile strength versus reduction of area, are typical of steels in the quenched and tempered condition. Figure 3 shows the direct relationship between ductility and hardness and illustrates the fact that the reduction of area decreases as hardness increases, and that, for a given hardness, the reduction of area is generally higher for alloy steels than for plain carbon steels.
Standard

Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated Wrought Steels

2011-10-27
CURRENT
J413_201110
The figures in this SAE Information Report illustrate the principle that, regardless of composition, steels of the same cross-sectional hardness produced by tempering after through hardening will have approximately the same longitudinal1 tensile strength at room temperature. Figure 1 shows the relation between hardness and longitudinal tensile strength of 0.30 to 0.50% carbon steels in the fully hardened and tempered, as rolled, normalized, and annealed conditions. Figure 2 showing the relation between longitudinal tensile strength and yield strength, and Figure 3 illustrating longitudinal tensile strength versus reduction of area, are typical of steels in the quenched and tempered condition. Figure 3 shows the direct relationship between ductility and hardness and illustrates the fact that the reduction of area decreases as hardness increases, and that, for a given hardness, the reduction of area is generally higher for alloy steels than for plain carbon steels.
Standard

New Steel Designation System for Wrought or Rolled Steel

2005-07-20
CURRENT
J402_200507
This SAE Standard describes a new alphanumeric designation system for wrought steel used to designate wrought ferrous materials, identify chemical composition, and any other requirements listed in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices. The previous SAE steel designation coding system consisted of four or five numbers used to designate standard carbon and alloy steels specified to chemical composition ranges. Using SAE 1035 as an example, the 35 represents the nominal weight % carbon content for the grade. Using SAE 52100 as an example, the 100 represents the nominal weight % carbon content. The first two numbers of this four or five number series are used to designate the steel grade carbon or alloy system with variations in elements other than carbon. These are described in Table 1. In addition to the standard four or five number steel designation above, a letter was sometimes added to the grade code to denote a non-standard specific element being added to the standard grade.
Standard

CASE HARDENABILITY OF CARBURIZED STEELS

1997-11-01
CURRENT
J1975_199711
This SAE Information Report summarizes the characteristics of carburized steels and factors involved in controlling hardness, microstructure, and residual stress. Methods of determining case hardenability are reviewed, as well as methods to test for freedom from non-martensitic structures in the carburized case. Factors influencing case hardenability are also reviewed. Methods of predicting case hardenability are included, with examples of calculations for several standard carburizing steels. A bibliography is included in 2.2. The references provide more detailed information on the topics discussed in this document.
Standard

Case Hardenability of Carburized Steels

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1975_199106
This SAE Information Report summarizes the characteristics of carburized steels and factors involved in controlling hardness, microstructure, and residual stress. Methods of determining case hardenability are reviewed, as well as methods to test for freedom from non-martensitic structures in the carburized case. Factors influencing case hardenability are also reviewed. Methods of predicting case hardenability are included, with examples of calculations for several standard carburizing steels. A bibliography is included in 2.2. The references provide more detailed information on the topics discussed in this document.
Standard

Selecting and Specifying Hot-Rolled Steel Bar Products

1997-05-01
HISTORICAL
J2281_199705
This SAE Information Report relates to hot-rolled steel bar products. It is intended as a guideline to assist in the selection and specification of hot-rolled steel bar; however, it is not to be interpreted as a material specification in itself. To provide general information about steel bar products and to provide a guideline for their selection and specification.
Standard

Selecting and Specifying Hot-Rolled Steel Bar Products

2010-03-01
CURRENT
J2281_201003
This SAE Information Report relates to hot-rolled steel bar products. It is intended as a guideline to assist in the selection and specification of hot-rolled steel bar; however, it is not to be interpreted as a material specification in itself.
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