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Technical Paper

A Numerical Study of Cavitating Flow Through Various Nozzle Shapes

1997-05-01
971597
The flow through diesel fuel injector nozzles is important because of the effects on the spray and the atomization process. Modeling this nozzle flow is complicated by the presence of cavitation inside the nozzles. This investigation uses a two-dimensional, two-phase, transient model of cavitating nozzle flow to observe the individual effects of several nozzle parameters. The injection pressure is varied, as well as several geometric parameters. Results are presented for a range of rounded inlets, from r/D of 1/40 to 1/4. Similarly, results for a range of L/D from 2 to 8 are presented. Finally, the angle of the corner is varied from 50° to 150°. An axisymmetric injector tip is also simulated in order to observe the effects of upstream geometry on the nozzle flow. The injector tip calculations show that the upstream geometry has a small influence on the nozzle flow. The results demonstrate the model's ability to predict cavitating nozzle flow in several different geometries.
Technical Paper

An Application of the Coherent Flamelet Model to Diesel Engine Combustion

1995-02-01
950281
A turbulent combustion model based on the coherent flamelet model was developed in this study and applied to diesel engines. The combustion was modeled in three distinct but overlapping phases: low temperature ignition kinetics using the Shell ignition model, high temperature premixed burn using a single step Arrhenius equation, and the flamelet based diffusion burn. Two criteria for transitions based on temperature, heat release rate, and the local Damköhler number were developed for the progression of combustion between each of these phases. The model was implemented into the computational computer code KIVA-II. Previous experiments on a Caterpillar model E 300, # 1Y0540 engine, a Tacom LABECO research engine, and a single cylinder version of a Cummins N14 production engine were used to validate the cylinder averaged predictions of the model.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Intake Flow Characteristics on Diesel Engine Combustion

1995-02-01
950282
The three-dimensional CFD codes KIVA-II and KIVA-3 have been used together to study the effects of intake generated in-cylinder flow structure on fuel-air mixing and combustion in a direct injected (DI) Diesel engine. In order to more accurately account for the effect of intake flow on in-cylinder processes, the KIVA-II code has been modified to allow for the use of data from other CFD codes as initial conditions. Simulation of the intake and compression strokes in a heavy-duty four-stroke DI Diesel engine has been carried out using KIVA-3. Flow quantities and thermodynamic field information were then mapped into a computational grid in KIVA-II for use in the study of mixing and combustion. A laminar and turbulent timescale combustion model, as well as advanced spray models, including wave breakup atomization, dynamic drop drag, and spray-wall interaction has been used in KIVA-II.
Technical Paper

Spark Anemometry of Bulk Gas Velocity at the Plug Gap of a Firing Engine

1995-10-01
952459
The objective of the present work was to investigate a rapid method of obtaining the convection velocity of the bulk gas near the spark plug gap of a firing engine at the time of ignition. To accomplish this, a simple model was developed which utilized both the secondary current and voltage signals, from a conventional spark discharge. The model assumed the spark path was elongated in a rectangular U-shape by the flow. Based on experimentally measured electrical signals the mean convection velocity was computed. The convection velocity calculated by the model first needed calibration which was accomplished with a bench test that used a hot wire anemometer. The technique has a weak correlation at low velocities of 1-2 m/s, but correlates well at higher velocities up to 15 m/s.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Intake Generated Turbulence and Resolved Flow Structures on Combustion in DI Diesel Engines

1996-02-01
960634
Previous studies have shown the importance of the in-cylinder flow field which exists prior to fuel injection on performance and emissions behavior of direct injected (DI) diesel engines. Key parameters in the flow field are the turbulence level and the resolved structures, such as swirl and tumble flow. These characteristics are known to have significant effects on the fuel vaporization, droplet break-up, and fuel-air mixing. The relative importance of these effects is investigated through simulation of injection into a stirred, heated, constant volume combustion bomb, using the computational fluid dynamics codes KIVA-3 [9] and KIVA-II [10]. Initial conditions for these simulations are based on in-cylinder conditions which exist in a heavy duty DI diesel engine immediately prior to fuel injection.
Technical Paper

Modeling Fuel Film Formation and Wall Interaction in Diesel Engines

1996-02-01
960628
A fuel film model has been developed and implemented into the KIVA-II code to help account for fuel distribution during combustion in diesel engines. Spray-wall interaction and spray-film interaction are also incorporated into the model. The model simulates thin fuel film flow on solid surfaces of arbitrary configuration. This is achieved by solving the continuity and momentum equations for the two dimensional film that flows over a three dimensional surface. The major physical effects considered in the model include mass and momentum contributions to the film due to spray drop impingement, splashing effects, various shear forces, piston acceleration, and dynamic pressure effects. In order to adequately represent the drop interaction process, impingement regimes and post-impingement behavior have been modeled using experimental data and mass, momentum and energy conservation constraints. The regimes modeled for spray-film interaction are stick, rebound, spread, and splash.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of Intake Flow Structures on Fuel/Air Mixing in a Direct-injected Spark-Ignition Engine

1996-05-01
961192
Multidimensional computations were carried out to simulate the in-cylinder fuel/air mixing process of a direct-injection spark-ignition engine using a modified version of the KIVA-3 code. A hollow cone spray was modeled using a Lagrangian stochastic approach with an empirical initial atomization treatment which is based on experimental data. Improved Spalding-type evaporation and drag models were used to calculate drop vaporization and drop dynamic drag. Spray/wall impingement hydrodynamics was accounted for by using a phenomenological model. Intake flows were computed using a simple approach in which a prescribed velocity profile is specified at the two intake valve openings. This allowed three intake flow patterns, namely, swirl, tumble and non-tumble, to be considered. It was shown that fuel vaporization was completed at the end of compression stroke with early injection timing under the chosen engine operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer of Fuel Films Resulting from Impinging Sprays

1998-02-23
980132
To help account for fuel distribution during combustion in diesel engines, a fuel film model has been developed and implemented into the KIVA-II code [1]. Spray-wall interaction and spray-film interaction are also incorporated into the model. Modified wall functions for evaporating, wavy films are developed and tested. The model simulates thin fuel film flow on solid surfaces of arbitrary configuration. This is achieved by solving the continuity, momentum and energy equations for the two dimensional film that flows over a three dimensional surface. The major physical effects considered in the model include mass and momentum contributions to the film due to spray drop impingement, splashing effects, various shear forces, piston acceleration, dynamic pressure effects, and convective heat and mass transfer.
Technical Paper

Combustion Modeling of Conventional Diesel-type and HCCI-type Diesel Combustion with Large Eddy Simulations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0958
A general combustion model, in the context of large eddy simulations, was developed to simulate the full range of combustion in conventional diesel-type and HCCI-type diesels. The combustion model consisted of a Chemkin sub-model and an Extended Flamelet Time Scale (EFTS) sub-model. Specifically, Chemkin was used to simulate auto-ignition process. In the post-ignition phase, the combustion model was switched to EFTS. In the EFTS sub-model, combustion was assumed to be a combination of two elementary combustion modes: homogeneous combustion and flamelet combustion. The combustion index acted as a weighting factor blending the contributions from these two modes. The Chemkin sub-model neglected the subgrid scale turbulence-chemistry interactions whereas the EFTS model took them into account through a presumed PDF approach. The model was used to simulate an early injection mode of a Cummins DI diesel engine and a mode of a Caterpillar DI diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Pulsed Regeneration for DPF Aftertreatment Devices

2011-09-11
2011-24-0182
DPF regenerations involve a trade-off between fuel economy and DPF durability. High temperature regenerations of DPFs have fewer fuel penalties but simultaneously tend to give higher substrate temperatures, which can reduce thermal reliability. In order to weaken the trade-off, the integrated system-level model [1,2,3,4] is used to conduct optimization studies and explore novel regeneration strategies for DPF aftertreatment devices. The integrated model developed in the Engine Research Center (ERC) includes sub-models for engines, emissions, aftertreatment devices and controllers. Based on the engine and regeneration fuel economy, multiple and single cycle regeneration tests are performed and analyzed. The optimal soot loadings to initiate and terminate regenerations are discussed. A pulsed regeneration strategy, which is characterized by injecting multiple pulses of fuel (upstream of a DOC) during regenerations, is investigated.
Technical Paper

Flamelet Modeling with LES for Diesel Engine Simulations

2006-04-03
2006-01-0058
Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with a flamelet time scale combustion model is used to simulate diesel combustion. The flamelet time scale model uses a steady-state flamelet library for n-heptane indexed by mean mixture fraction, mixture fraction variance, and mean scalar dissipation rate. In the combustion model, reactions proceed towards the flamelet library solution at a time scale associated with the slowest reaction. This combination of a flamelet solution and a chemical time scale helps to account for unsteady mixing effects. The turbulent sub-grid stresses are simulated using a one-equation, non-viscosity LES model called the dynamic structure model. The model uses a tensor coefficient determined by the dynamic procedure and the subgrid kinetic energy. The model has been expanded to include scalar mixing and scalar dissipation. A new model for the conditional scalar dissipation has been developed to better predict local extinction.
Technical Paper

A New Approach to Model DI-Diesel HCCI Combustion for Use in Cycle Simulation Studies

2005-10-24
2005-01-3743
An approach to accurately capture overall behavior in a system level model of DI Diesel HCCI engine operation is presented. The modeling methodology is an improvement over the previous effort [36], where a multi-zone model with detailed chemical kinetics was coupled with an engine cycle simulation code. This multi-zone technique was found to be inadequate in capturing the fuel spray dynamics and its impact on mixing. An improved methodology is presented in this paper that can be used to model fully and partially premixed charge compression ignition engines. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) driven model is used where the effects of fuel injection, spray evolution, evaporation, and turbulent mixing are considered. The modeling approach is based on the premise that once the initial spray dynamics are correctly captured, the overall engine predictions during the combustion process can be captured with good accuracy.
Technical Paper

Investigating the Effect of Spray Targeting and Impingement on Diesel Engine Cold Start

2000-03-06
2000-01-0269
Analysis of the cold-starting performance of diesel engines requires the development of advanced models to describe the multicomponent nature of the fuel as well as the spray impingement and wall film behavior. A new approach to modeling the multicomponent nature of commercial fuels was implemented. This model is based on a continuous distribution using a probability density function, rather than the use of discrete components, to capture more accurately the entire range of composition in commercial fuels. The model was applied to single droplet calculations to validate the predictions against experimental results. Previous discrete component wall-film modeling has been extended to include the continuous multicomponent fuel representation. A significant factor that has received little attention in analyzing the cold-start performance of diesel engines is the spray impingement angle and location. This has been investigated using the modified KIVA code.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study of Fuel/Air Mixture Preparation in a GDI Engine

1999-10-25
1999-01-3657
Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the fuel/air mixing preparation in a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine. A two-valve OHV engine with wedge combustion chamber is investigated since automobiles equipped with this type of engine are readily available in the U.S. market. Modifying and retrofitting these engines for GDI operation could become a viable scenario for some engine manufactures. A pressure-swirl injector and wide spacing injection layout are adapted to enhance mixture preparation. The primary interest is on preparing the mixture with adequate equivalence ratio at the spark plug under a wide range of engine operating conditions. Two different engine operating conditions are investigated with respect to engine speed and load. A modified version of the KIVA-3V multi-dimensional CFD code is used. The modified code includes the Linearized Instability Sheet Atomization (LISA) model to simulate the development of the hollow cone spray.
Technical Paper

Using Large Eddy Simulations to Study Mixing Effects in Early Injection Diesel Engine Combustion

2006-04-03
2006-01-0871
Early direct injection with HCCI like properties is characterized by the presence of an ignition dwell - the interval between end of fuel injection and start of combustion, during which fuel-air mixing occurs. Previous work by Jhavar and Rutland (2005) has focused on investigating different methods to affect fuel-air mixing during the ignition dwell. That study helped to evaluate the relative influence of various mixing control strategies to achieve ignition control. In this study, we attempt to look into the mixture preparation process in more detail. Therefore, turbulence is studied using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models in place of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) models. While LES is computationally more expensive than RANS, it depicts the flow structure more accurately. Therefore, it can be applied to engines in order to gain a better representation of local mixing as well as accurately simulate unsteady flow behavior in engines.
Technical Paper

Investigation of the Effect of DPF Loading and Passive Regeneration on Engine Performance and Emissions Using an Integrated System Simulation

2006-04-03
2006-01-0263
An integrated system model containing sub-models for a diesel engine, NOx and soot emissions, and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) has been used to simulate stead-state engine operating conditions. The simulation results have been used to investigate the effect of DPF loading and passive regeneration on engine performance and emissions. This work is the continuation of previous work done to create an overall diesel engine/exhaust system integrated model. As in the previous work, a diesel engine, exhaust system, engine soot emissions, and diesel particulate filter (DPF) sub-models have been integrated into an overall model using Matlab Simulink. For the current work new sub-models have been added for engine-out NOx emissions and an engine feedback controller. The integrated model is intended for use in simulating the interaction of the engine and exhaust aftertreatment components.
Technical Paper

Sensitivity Analysis of a Diesel Exhaust System Thermal Model

2004-03-08
2004-01-1131
A modeling study has been conducted in order to characterize the heat transfer in an automotive diesel exhaust system. The exhaust system model, focusing on 2 exhaust pipes, has been created using a transient 1-D engine flow network simulation program. Model results are in excellent agreement with experimental data gathered before commencement of the modeling study. Predicted pipe exit stream temperatures are generally within one percent of experimental values. Sensitivity analysis of the model was the major focus of this study. Four separate variables were chosen for the sensitivity analysis. These being the external convective heat transfer coefficient, external emissivity, mass flow rate of exhaust gases, and amplitude of incoming pressure fluctuations. These variables were independently studied to determine their contribution to changes in exhaust gas stream temperature and system heat flux. There are two primary benefits obtained from conducting this analysis.
Technical Paper

Optimization of Diesel Engine Operating Parameters Using Neural Networks

2003-10-27
2003-01-3228
Neural networks are useful tools for optimization studies since they are very fast, so that while capturing the accuracy of multi-dimensional CFD calculations or experimental data, they can be run numerous times as required by many optimization techniques. This paper describes how a set of neural networks trained on a multi-dimensional CFD code to predict pressure, temperature, heat flux, torque and emissions, have been used by a genetic algorithm in combination with a hill-climbing type algorithm to optimize operating parameters of a diesel engine over the entire speed-torque map of the engine. The optimized parameters are mass of fuel injected per cycle, shape of the injection profile for dual split injection, start of injection, EGR level and boost pressure. These have been optimized for minimum emissions. Another set of neural networks have been trained to predict the optimized parameters, based on the speed-torque point of the engine.
Technical Paper

Improvement of Neural Network Accuracy for Engine Simulations

2003-10-27
2003-01-3227
Neural networks have been used for engine computations in the recent past. One reason for using neural networks is to capture the accuracy of multi-dimensional CFD calculations or experimental data while saving computational time, so that system simulations can be performed within a reasonable time frame. This paper describes three methods to improve upon neural network predictions. Improvement is demonstrated for in-cylinder pressure predictions in particular. The first method incorporates a physical combustion model within the transfer function of the neural network, so that the network predictions incorporate physical relationships as well as mathematical models to fit the data. The second method shows how partitioning the data into different regimes based on different physical processes, and training different networks for different regimes, improves the accuracy of predictions.
Technical Paper

Experiments and CFD Modeling of Direct Injection Gasoline HCCI Engine Combustion

2002-06-03
2002-01-1925
The present study investigated HCCI combustion in a heavy-duty diesel engine both experimentally and numerically. The engine was equipped with a hollow-cone pressure-swirl injector using gasoline direct injection. Characteristics of HCCI combustion were obtained by very early injection with a heated intake charge. Experimental results showed an increase in NOx emission and a decrease in UHC as the injection timing was retarded. It was also found that optimization can be achieved by controlling the intake temperature together with the start-of-injection timing. The experiments were modeled by using an engine CFD code with detailed chemistry. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into KIVA-3V such that the chemistry and flow solutions were coupled. The model predicted ignition timing, cylinder pressure, and heat release rates reasonably well. The NOx emissions were found to increase as the injection timing was retarded, in agreement with experimental results.
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