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Technical Paper

A Validation Study of Vehicle Dynamics Simulations for Heavy Truck Handling Maneuvers

2001-03-05
2001-01-0139
This paper deals with the ongoing efforts at The Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC) in East Liberty, Ohio in promoting the safe operation of heavy trucks. The associated research evaluated two vehicle dynamics simulations for their accuracy in predicting tractor-trailer handling metrics. The goals of the research were threefold: 1. Establish a generic “benchmark” parametric data set for the three-axle truck/two-axle trailer vehicle 2. Demonstrate the accuracy of experimental data that was collected for the tractor-trailer vehicle of this study 3. Demonstrate the accuracy of two vehicle simulations by comparing their predicted responses to experimentally observed vehicle responses and metrics.
Technical Paper

Improving Steering Feel for the National Advanced Driving Simulator

1997-02-24
970567
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC) plans to evolve the state-of-the-art of steering system modeling for driving simulators with the ultimate goal being the development of a high fidelity steering feel model for the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS). The VRTC plans on developing reliable research tools that can be used to determine the necessary features for a steering model that will provide good objective and subjective steering feel. This paper reviews past and continuing work conducted at the VRTC and provides a plan for future work that will achieve this goal.
Technical Paper

Validation Results from Using NADSdyna Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

1997-02-24
970565
This paper presents an evaluation of a vehicle dynamics model intended to be used for the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS). Dynamic validation for high performance simulation is not merely a comparison between experimental and simulation plots. It involves strong insight of vehicle's subsystems mechanics, limitations of the mathematical formulations, and experimental predictions. Lateral, longitudinal, and ride dynamics are evaluated using field test data, and analytical diagnostics. The evaluation includes linear and non-linear range of vehicle dynamics response.
Technical Paper

Parameter Measurement and Development of a NADSdyna Validation Data Set for a 1994 Ford Taurus

1997-02-24
970564
This paper discusses the development of a 1994 Ford Taurus vehicle model for the National Advanced Driving Simulator's planned vehicle dynamics simulation, NADSdyna. The front and rear suspensions of the Taurus are modeled using recursive rigid body dynamics formulations. To complement vehicle dynamics, subsystems models that include steering, braking, and tire forces are included. These models provide state-of-the-art high fidelity vehicle handling dynamics for real-time simulation. The realism of a particular formulation depend heavily on how the parameters are obtained from the physical system. Therefore, the development of a data set for a particular model is as important as the model itself. The methodology for generating the Taurus data set is presented. The power train model is not yet included, so the simulation is run with the vehicle either at constant speed or decelerating.
Technical Paper

Methodology for Validating the National Advanced Driving Simulator's Vehicle Dynamics (NADSdyna)

1997-02-24
970562
This paper presents an overview of work performed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC) to test, validate, and improve the planned National Advanced Driving Simulator's (NADS) vehicle dynamics simulation. This vehicle dynamics simulation, called NADSdyna, was developed by the University of Iowa's Center for Computer-Aided Design (CCAD) NADSdyna is based upon CCAD's general purpose, real-time, multi-body dynamics software, referred to as the Real-Time Recursive Dynamics (RTRD), supplemented by vehicle dynamics specific submodules VRTC has “beta tested” NADSdyna, making certain that the software both works as computer code and that it correctly models vehicle dynamics. This paper gives an overview of VRTC's beta test work with NADSdyna. The paper explains the methodology used by VRTC to validate NADSdyna.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Dynamic Characteristics of Tire Lateral and Longitudinal Force Responses to Dynamic Inputs

1995-02-01
950314
This paper presents the development of a tire model for use in the simulation of vehicle dynamics. The model was developed to predict tire lateral and longitudinal force responses to dynamic inputs. In this new tire model, the contact patch of a tire is lumped into a number of elements to study the dynamic behavior of the displacement of the tire contact patch in the lateral and longitudinal directions. For each displacement, a differential equation governing the dynamic behavior of the displacement to the dynamic inputs is derived. Based on the differential equations for the lateral and longitudinal displacements, difference equations are derived for the purpose of simulating tire output responses. Since system parameters, such as mass, damping and stiffness, in the difference equations are unknown, estimation of system parameters is performed using the differential equations and experimental data measured for this research.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the Evolution of Computer Assisted Motor Vehicle Accident Reconstruction

1987-10-01
871991
This paper presents an overview of the evolution of computer simulations in vehicle collision and occupant kinematic reconstructions. The basic principles behind these simulations, the origin of these programs and the evolution of these programs from a basic analytical mathematical model to a sophisticated computer program are discussed. In addition, a brief computer development history is discussed to demonstrate how the evolution of computer assisted vehicle accident reconstruction becomes feasible for a reconstructionist. Possible future research in computer reconstruction is also discussed.
Technical Paper

Critical Review of the Use of Seat Belts by Pregnant Women

1989-02-01
890752
Seat belt usage in the United States is increasing dramatically, due in part to legislative action. In addition, education programs have improved public awareness of the need for automotive restraints in achieving crash survival and injury reduction. The safety consciousness level of automobile passengers is particularly strong among pregnant women. It is reasonable to expect wider use of seat belts by expectant mothers due to this acute attention to safety. The literature demonstrates that incorrect usage of seat belts is a cause of injury. This can be especially applicable during pregnancy when changes in anatomy dictate a change in belt positioning, Review of the literature shows that the technical issues associated with the use of current production belt restraint systems by pregnant women has not been addressed.
Technical Paper

A Graphic Computer Simulation of the Pedestrian Vehicle Impact

1982-02-01
820170
This paper presents an interactive computer simulation of the pedestrian/vehicle interface. The simulation presents the results in an easy to analyze format including animation of the whole event. User requests for specific output data is available via a graphic menu. The model employs the use of the MacLaughlin/Daniel Computer Simulation developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. To illustrate the usefulness of the graphical and pictorial output, the results of a pedestrian/vehicle impact are presented.
Technical Paper

A Comparison between Two Different Computer Simulations in Measuring the Vehicle/Pedestrian Impact

1982-02-01
820171
This paper presents the analytical results of two different computer simulations of the vehicle pedestrian impact; PROMETHEUS 2 and the MacLaughlin/Daniel (MACDAN) models. The results presented illustrate the simularity and differences between the two models and accuracy of both to predict the actual occurrance. Also presented is a discussion relative to the modeling techniques of obtaining data for the pedestrian. This presentation illustrates the scaling techniques and actual data obtained in order to accurately simulate the pedestrian.
Technical Paper

Simulation Results from a Model of a Tractor Trailer Vehicle Equipped with Roll Stability Control

2010-04-12
2010-01-0098
In 2007, a software model of a Roll Stability Control (RSC) system was developed based on test data for a Volvo tractor at NHTSA's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC). This model was designed to simulate the RSC performance of a commercially available Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system. The RSC model was developed in Simulink and integrated with the available braking model (TruckSim) for the truck. The Simulink models were run in parallel with the vehicle dynamics model of a truck in TruckSim. The complete vehicle model including the RSC system model is used to simulate the behavior of the actual truck and determine the capability of the RSC system in preventing rollovers under different conditions. Several simulations were performed to study the behavior of the model developed and to compare its performance with that of an actual test vehicle equipped with RSC.
Technical Paper

Kinematic Suspension Model Applicable to Dynamic Full Vehicle Simulation

2003-03-03
2003-01-0859
Computer simulations are popular for modeling vehicle system dynamics. However, further refinement of the vehicle dynamic model is required for extensive use in the automotive industry. In this paper, the model refining procedure is illustrated by developing reliable kinematic models verified with laboratory test results; instrument test data; and a mathematical optimization method. More specifically, simple kinematic models are developed for reduced computation times using ADAMS. They are tuned by the gradient-based optimization technique using the results from a laboratory testing facility, which includes the compliance effect in order to use the kinematic models in dynamic simulations. Also the Magic Formula tire model is developed using the optimization method and tire property data for the STI (Systems Technology, Incorporated) tire model.
Technical Paper

Tractor-Semitrailer Stability Following a Steer Axle Tire Blowout at Speed and Comparison to Computer Simulation Models

2013-04-08
2013-01-0795
This paper documents the vehicle response of a tractor-semitrailer following a sudden air loss (Blowout) in a steer axle tire while traveling at highway speeds. The study seeks to compare full-scale test data to predicted response from detailed heavy truck computer vehicle dynamics simulation models. Full-scale testing of a tractor-semitrailer experiencing a sudden failure of a steer axle tire was conducted. Vehicle handling parameters were recorded by on-board computers leading up to and immediately following the sudden air loss. Inertial parameters (roll, yaw, pitch, and accelerations) were measured and recorded for the tractor and semitrailer, along with lateral and longitudinal speeds. Steering wheel angle was also recorded. These data are presented and also compared to the results of computer simulation models. The first simulation model, SImulation MOdel Non-linear (SIMON), is a vehicle dynamic simulation model within the Human Vehicle Environment (HVE) software environment.
Technical Paper

Advancements in Tire Modeling Through Implementation of Load and Speed Dependent Coefficients

2005-11-01
2005-01-3543
An existing tire model was investigated for additional normal load-dependent characteristics to improve the large truck simulations developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS). Of the existing tire model coefficients, plysteer, lateral friction decay, aligning torque stiffness and normalized longitudinal stiffness were investigated. The findings of the investigation led to improvements in the tire model. The improved model was then applied to TruckSim to compare with the TruckSim table lookup tire model and test data. Additionally, speed-dependent properties for the NADS tire model were investigated (using data from a light truck tire).
Technical Paper

Vehicle Dynamics Modeling for the National Advanced Driving Simulator of a 1997 Jeep Cherokee

1999-03-01
1999-01-0121
This paper discusses the development of the 1997 Jeep Cherokee model for the National Advanced Driving Simulator's planned vehicle dynamics software, NADSdyna. Recursive rigid body formalism called the Real Time Recursive Dynamics (RTRD) developed by the University of Iowa is used to model the front and rear suspension mechanisms. To complement vehicle dynamics for simulator applications, subsystems that include tires, aerodynamics, powertrain, brake, and steering are added to the rigid body dynamics model. These models provide high fidelity driving realism to simulate severe handling maneuvers in real time. The soundness of the model does not only depend on the mathematics of the model, but also on the validity of the parameters. Therefore, this paper discusses thoroughly the methodology of parameters estimation. A generic model of cruise control is included.
Technical Paper

Consumer Braking Performance Information Initiative

1999-03-01
1999-01-1291
A test procedure that rates brake performance must control variability so that measured differences between vehicles are real. Tests were conducted using standard brake test procedures with three drivers in three cars on wet and dry asphalt with the ABS working and disabled. The differences between vehicles were greater than differences due to ABS condition, surface condition, and drivers. The procedure measured differences between all the vehicles with statistical certainty but used many replications and drivers. If only large differences in performance need to be distinguished, fewer replications and drivers will be needed.
Technical Paper

Suspension Parameter Measurement Using Side-Pull Test To Enhance Modeling of Vehicle Roll

1999-03-01
1999-01-1323
This paper describes a new laboratory test facility for measuring suspension parameters that affect rollover. The Side-Pull mechanism rolls the test vehicle through a cable attached rigidly at its center of gravity (CG). Changes in wheel camber and wheel steer angles are measured as a function of body roll angle. The roll test simulates a steady-state cornering. Thus, both compliance and kinematic forces are fed simultaneously to the vehicle as they would be applied in a real cornering situation. The lateral load transfer, and roll angle as a function of simulated lateral acceleration is determined. The Side-Pull Roll Measurement has advantages over the conventional roll tests where the rolling force couple is applied vertically. The Side-Pull mechanism rolls the vehicle in a unrestricted way with horizontal forces applied at the tire / pad contact and the CG location. Thus, the measurements take into account coupling of compliance with roll.
Technical Paper

The Impact of Worn Shocks on Vehicle Handling and Stability

2006-04-03
2006-01-0563
The intent of this research is to understand the effects worn dampers have on vehicle stability and safety through dynamic model simulation. Dampers, an integral component of a vehicle's suspension system, play an important role in isolating road disturbances from the driver by controlling the motions of the sprung and unsprung masses. This paper will show that a decrease in damping leads to excessive body motions and a potentially unstable vehicle. The concept of poor damping affecting vehicle stability is well established through linear models. The next step is to extend this concept for non-linear models. This is accomplished through creating a vehicle simulation model and executing several driving maneuvers with various damper characteristics. The damper models used in this study are based on splines representing peak force versus velocity relationships.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of a Shock Model for Vehicle Simulation

2007-04-16
2007-01-0845
This paper describes the development of a more accurate shock absorber model in order to obtain better vehicle simulation results. Previous shock models used a single spline to represent shock force versus shock velocity curves. These models produced errors in vehicle simulations because the damper characteristics are better represented by the application of a hysteresis loop in the model. Thus, a new damper model that includes a hysteresis loop is developed using Matlab Simulink. The damper characteristics for the new model were extracted from measurements made on a shock dynamometer. The new model better represents experimental shock data. The new shock model is incorporated into two different lumped-parameter vehicle models: one is a three degree-of-freedom vehicle handling model and the other is a seven degree-of-freedom vehicle ride model. The new damper model is compared with the previous model for different shock mileages (different degrees of wear).
Technical Paper

Development and Implementation of a Path-Following Algorithm for an Autonomous Vehicle

2007-04-16
2007-01-0815
This paper describes the development and implementation of an accurate and repeatable path-following algorithm focused ultimately on vehicle testing. A compact, lightweight, and portable hardware package allows easy installation and negligible impact on the vehicle mass, even for the smallest automobile. Innovative features include the ability to generate a smooth, evenly-spaced path vector regardless the quality of the given path. The algorithm proposed in this work is suitable for testing in a controlled environment. The system was evaluated in simulation and performed well in road tests at low speeds.
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