Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Standard

Prognostic Metrics for Engine Health Management Systems

2016-02-26
CURRENT
AIR5909
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents metrics for assessing the performance of prognostic algorithms applied for Engine Health Management (EHM) functions. The emphasis is entirely on prognostics and as such is intended to provide an extension and complement to such documents as AIR5871, which offers information and guidance on general prognostic approaches relevant to gas turbines, and AIR4985 which offers general metrics for evaluating diagnostic systems and their impact on engine health management activities.
Standard

A Methodology for Quantifying the Performance of an Engine Monitoring System

2005-01-05
CURRENT
AIR4985
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to present a quantitative approach for evaluating the performance and capabilities of an Engine Monitoring System (EMS). The value of such a methodology is in providing a systematic means to accomplish the following: 1 Determine the impact of an EMS on key engine supportability indices such as Fault Detection Rate, Fault Isolation Rate, Mean Time to Diagnose, In-flight Shutdowns (IFSD), Mission Aborts, and Unscheduled Engine Removals (UERs). 2 Facilitate trade studies during the design process in order to compare performance versus cost for various EMS design strategies, and 3 Define a “common language” for specifying EMS requirements and the design features of an EMS in order to reduce ambiguity and, therefore, enhance consistency between specification and implementation.
Standard

Engine Electrostatic Gas Path Monitoring

1999-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4986
Turbine engine malfunctions account for a substantial portion of the maintenance actions required to keep both fixed and rotary wing aircraft operational. Undetected incipient component failures can result in secondary engine damage and expensive unscheduled maintenance actions. Recent developments of electrostatic methods now provide the potential for the detection of foreign object ingestion and early detection of distress in gas path components. This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) seeks to outline the history of the electrostatic technique and provides examples of state-of-the-art systems for both inlet and exhaust gas debris monitoring systems along with examples of most recent testing.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Power Train Monitoring

2002-03-06
HISTORICAL
AIR4174
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which the gas generator energy is transferred to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers engine power train components, their interfaces, transmissions, gearboxes, hanger bearings, shafting and associated rotating accessories, propellers and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. This document addresses application for rotorcraft, turboprop, and propfan drive trains for both commercial and military aircraft.
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Power Train Monitoring

2017-07-19
CURRENT
AIR4174A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which aircraft propulsion energy in a turbine or reciprocating engine is converted via a gear train to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers aircraft engine driven transmission and gearbox components, their interfaces, drivetrain shafting, drive shaft hanger bearings, and associated rotating accessories, propellers, and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. For guidance on monitoring additional engine components not addressed, herein (e.g., main shaft bearings and compressor/turbine rotors), refer to ARP1839.
Standard

A GUIDE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A GROUND STATION FOR ENGINE CONDITION MONITORING

1994-02-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4175
An effective ground station is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design. Unlike on-board processing systems which principally use data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, ground stations offer much greater processing power to analyse and manipulate EMS data more comprehensively for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements which will determine the basic design of a ground station, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistics systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in EMS ground station technology which have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines. Finally, this document addresses the program management requirements associated with the initial development and on-going support of a ground station.
Standard

A Guide to the Development of a Ground Station for Engine Condition Monitoring

2005-02-16
HISTORICAL
AIR4175A
An effective GSS is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design, including asset management. Unlike the on-board part of the EMS which principally uses real time data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, a GSS can offer much greater processing power to comprehensively analyze and manipulate EMS data for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements used to determine the basis design of a GSS, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistic systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in GSS technology that have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines.
Standard

The Preparation and Use of Chromel-Alumel Thermocouples for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1996-11-01
CURRENT
AIR46B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) reviews the precautions that must be taken and the corrections which must be evaluated and applied if the experimental error in measuring the temperature of a hot gas stream with a thermocouple is to be kept to a practicable minimum. Discussions will focus on Type K thermocouples. These are defined in NBS Monograph 125 as nickel-chromium alloy versus nickel-aluminum alloy thermocouples.
Standard

Engine Monitoring System Reliability and Validity

2006-11-15
HISTORICAL
AIR5120
For Engine Monitoring Systems to meet their potential for improved safety and reduced operation and support costs, significant attention must be focused on their reliability and validity throughout the life cycle. This AIR will provide program managers, designers, developers and customers a concise reference of the activities, approaches and considerations for the development and verification of a highly reliable engine monitoring system. When applying the guidelines of this AIR it should be noted that engine monitoring systems physically or functionally integrated with the engine control system and/or performing functions that affect engine safety or are used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions shall be subject to the Type Investigation of the product in which they'll be incorporated and have to show compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements as defined by the responsible Aviation Authority.
Standard

GUIDE TO TEMPERATURE MONITORING IN AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINES

1991-02-07
HISTORICAL
AIR1900
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes.
Standard

Guide to Temperature Monitoring in Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1997-11-01
CURRENT
AIR1900A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes.
Standard

Recommended Ice Bath for Reference Junctions

1964-08-01
CURRENT
ARP691
The ice bath recommended herein is similar to that described in SAE AIR 46.* Some material not presented in AIR 46, including preferred dimensions, has been added.
Standard

Software Interfaces for Ground-Based Monitoring Systems

2001-09-01
HISTORICAL
AS4831
To establish a specification for software input and output interfaces for condition monitoring and performance programs used to monitor equipment from multiple manufacturers. The purpose of standardizing these interfaces is to improve operational flexibility and efficiency of monitoring systems as an aid to cost effectiveness (e.g., easier implementation).
Standard

AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINE MONITORING SYSTEM GUIDE

1993-04-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1587A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is a system guide for Engine Monitoring System (EMS) definition and implementation. This keystone document addresses EMS benefits, capabilities, and requirements. It includes EMS in-flight and ground applications consisting of people, equipment, and software. It recommends EMS requirements that are a balance of selected benefits and available capabilities. This ARP purposely addresses a wide range of EMS architecture. The intent is to provide an extensive list of possible EMS design options. NOTE: a Section 3 describes an EMS. b Sections 4 and 5 outline benefits and capabilities that should be considered for study purposes to define EMS baselines for how much engine monitoring is required. c Section 6 provides implementation requirements that should be considered for an EMS after study baseline levels of EMS complexity are selected.
Standard

Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Health Management System Guide

2007-05-21
CURRENT
ARP1587B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) examines the whole construct of an Engine Health Management (EHM) system. This keystone document gives a top-level view and addresses EHM description, benefits, and capabilities, and provides examples. This ARP purposely addresses a wide range of EHM architectures to demonstrate possible EHM design options. This ARP is not intended as a legal document and does not provide detailed implementation steps, but does address general implementation concerns and potential benefits. Other SAE documents (Aerospace Standards, Aerospace Recommended Practices, and Aerospace Information Reports) address specific component specifications, procedures and "lessons learned".
Standard

A Guide to Aircraft Turbine Engine Vibration Monitoring Systems

2015-12-20
CURRENT
ARP1839
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174. This ARP also contains the essential elements of AS8054 which remain relevant and which have not been incorporated into Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) specifications.
X